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Full text of "Aurora"

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"The body is a unit, though it is made up of many parts; and 
though all its parts are many, they form one body. So it is with 
Christ." 1 Corinthians 12:12. Each year, another set of students 
comes to Olivet with their own story, bringing their own talents, 
goals, interests, characteristics, and opinions to the coftmufiity 
of Olivet. But when this community of individuals is. InJ^rWb- 
ven, a strong bond is created. Ecciesiastes 4:1 2 states/'thdugh: 
one may be overpowered, two can defend themselves. A tord 
of three strands is not quickly broken." 



From the stud^^|^|3 are introverts; to the jitgdents wK0 
are extroverts; from trie;^amers to the athletes; fi*om artists tO: 
mathematicians; and from Cubs fanstO'Whrte Sdxfarts,:^ 
of differences is unending. Though una|(^ 

share similar stories, histories, artd paths,; intef^V^^ 
ate the student body of Olivet, the coi^bihjatidnd^^^^ 
and differences together with Christ hiiaftieS a bond no m*aj 
break. 




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In recent years. Olivet has celebrated our history and looked 
forward to our future during our Centennial celebration. But 
this year, we celebrate Olivet's students. They have come to get 
an education, but have found themselves receiving much more: 
Godly, life-long relationships/All of these future businessmen, 
teachers, journalists, singers, nurses, missionaries, artists, pas- 
tors, engineers, police officers, lawyers — these unique indi- 
viduals who make up a body of one — have all found common 
ground through this community called Olivet Nazarene Uni- 
versity. 



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Olivet's students come from a variety of backgrounds. Some were raised in tlie 
cinurch; otiiers were not. Some do not yet l<now God; otiiers Inave known Him all tineir 
lives. All of the students on campus have a unique story and Olivet may be the only com- 
mon factor. 

For example, freshman John Christensen was forced to attend a private religious high 
school. He did not enjoy his time there at all. "Everyone there was fake," he said. "Basically, 
the actions of the students did not match up to what they said was correct." 

John and his fellow students would talk about a certain topic in Bible class, and the 
lifestyles of those in class were the complete opposite of the teachings of the Bible. Al- 
though he wanted a strong relationship with God, this frustrated him to the point that he 
did not want to attend a religious school once he graduated. He applied to Olivet only as 
a last resort. 

After he graduated, John and his church went on a mission trip to Israel, Egypt and 
Hungary. It was there that he built relationships like never before. "The relationships were 
incredible," he said. "I never realized how big God was." 

The trip showed John what it meant to grow in God. He was "narrow-mindejJ" when 
it came to mission work and the trip opened 
his eyes. Two days after John returned from his | 
mission trip, he decided that he would enroll at 
Olivet. It was not his parents' decision to come 
here. It was John's and God's. "I knew that peo- 
ple really grew with God while at Olivet," he said, 
"and I want that more than anything." It was a 
last-minute decision for John, but it turned out 
to be the right one. 

Senior Brooklin Soulia, on the other hand, 
was destined to be an Olivetian her whole life, 
whether she realized it or not. Her mother, fa- 
ther, and brother all attended Olivet. "I actually 
wanted to go everywhere but Olivet at first," 
Brooklin said, "but I opened myself up to the 
Lord and He told me that He wanted me here." 

Brooklin described her feelings about how 
God revealed His plan for her life. "I feel like He 
opens up different doors. He didn't destine me 
here, but He opened the door for me along the 
way and I followed it." When her mother was 
here, she was Homecoming queen and now 
Brooklin is following in her footsteps as the 
2008 Homecoming Oueen. 

Compared to the other schools that Brook- 
lin looked at. Olivet had a better community, 
better programs, and better scholarships.The community has been the best part of her experience here. She enjoyed the programs, the professors, 

her fellow students, and all of the friends she has made along the way. 

While students like John and Brooke may arrive at Olivet for different reasons, once here, they're stories are undeniably interwoven. 




Feature Story: BROUGHT TOGETHER BY OLIVET 




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Feature Story: BROUGHT TOGETHER BY OLIVET 7 



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Men of wisdom, integrity and Godly character are hard to come by in this day and age. When men of such character are 
found, they deserve to be honored for their efforts and commitment to the Lord. This year the Aurora staff would like to 
honor a man who fits this description well, Dr. KentOiney. Dr. OIney has taught at Olivet Nazarene University for 14 years 
and enjoys his work very much. 






Every day he has the opportunity to impact many students. "Dr. OIney has the incredible ability to be frank and firm when 
it comes to truth, while simultaneously showing genuine care and concern for individuals," says student Daniel Allen. 



Dr. OIney grew up in Michigan and was the third of four children. He acted as interpreter growing up because two of his 
siblings were deaf, and this skill has served him well his whole life. 

When he was 1 5, a revival broke out in his church in Michigan, and this experience left Dr. OIney's life forever changed 
through the power of the Spirit. 

Dr. OIney attended Asbury College in Wilmore, Ky., for his undergraduate work. He went on to acquire a Master of Divin- 
ity from Asbury Seminary, and attended Gallaudet University in Washington D.C. for a master's degree in counseling. He, 
then attended the University of Oregon for a master's and Ph.D. in sociology. Dr. OIney also served as pastor at an all-deaf 
church in Salem, Ore., for 1 years. His sermons were all in sign language, which accounts for why he is so animated when 
he teaches. Dr. OIney loved pastoring this congregation, and according to his wife, Beth, "He LOVED living in Oregon, with 
the mountains and the ocean." 

Dr. OIney teaches many classes at Olivet, including Intro to Sociology, Sociology of the Family, Sociology of Marriage, Hu- 
man Sexuality, Sociology of the Deaf Community, Social Theory and Senior Research. Through his teaching he desires to 
open up Scripture for young and old and help them understand it. For each course he teaches, he has prepared a Scrip- 
ture passage to try to incorporate the biblical principles into the educational information. 

According to his wife. Dr. OIney has taken to heart what Proverbs says about being a good husband and father. On this 
subject Beth says, "He is a great husband and father, and I attribute most — if not all — of that to his relationship with the 
Lord."She says that even during his busy days of writing his dissertation he would get up early in the morning to write so 
that he could spend time at night with his wife and children, Kyle and Luke. 

Dr. OIney is not just an average professor who could be found on any college campus, but he is truly unique and a man 
worth honoring. 

Student Adam Ray says, "Dr. OIney is more than just a professor; he is a leading example of a Christian man who demon- 
strates his dedication to the Lord, his love for his family and his compassion toward his students. He is someone you can 
look up to and learn from while knowing that he will take the time and put forth the effort to make your time at Olivet a 
success." 



8 



DEDICATION 



1 




1. Dr. Kent Olney and his wife, 
Beth, pose for a picture with sons, 
Luke and Kyle. 2. A young Dr. Ol- 
ney smiles for the camera. 3. Kent 
and two of his siblings enjoy their 
t playtime. 4. Dr. Olney poses for a 
basketball photo. 5. Holding his 
Asbury College diploma. Dr. Olney 
smiles proudly. 6. Kent and Beth 
Olney cherish their wedding day. 7. 
Dr. Olney spends time with his sons, 
Kyle and Luke. 8. Dr. Olney cel- 
ebrates his doctoral degree with is 
' wife. 9. Dr. Olney relaxes in his 
office at Olivet. 



DEDICATION 




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°"r hands, we visited a place whl," ^^""^ ^'^ ' ""'^ «n^e on 
weaving fine rugs. We fol owed thema™^ "^^^^^^-"/vvomen were 
g'nning stages to the final showroom wh?""^ ^'°'''' ^'°"^ ^ be- 
^Play. It was fascinating ""^ ^^"^^^""dredsofrugswereon 



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wool, coSnd *.r:s:::reir '"*" °"- ^^-^ °f ^ 

both muted and brilliant colors We nh^^^ '''°'^''' "t^'* Produced 
«te patterns and designs Then !:stoodT T' *^*P'"9 ™" 
young woman operating an ancle" t C T ' ^° .' '™" "^'*'"9 ' 
the threads together. Through tTe wor^h ^^ ^'^'"^ ^^^ ^o^e • 
«tong grip, a rug began to appear Itll T^^' «"9ers and 
- rt was beautiful. ^P""' '' ""^^ durable, useful, and most of al 

, fact thattel'SrL'c^a^ntr™"^"^^ °^-* -9^ '^V ^n the 

cannot compare in strength oTsp, dcJa^tH ' '"^'^ "^^^^^ ^'°"e 
■ '"" ""^'^^ -aether in harmonfwitt gra'd^d^::;' ''"^* ''^' ^^- 

^^hatistrueof fine rugs istrueofaplacellkeoiivet. 

combined, produces a collective portrait o?T °^''*^ '^''' "hen 
of faith and learning. Each strand^, m "*'""* ""^ '="<=tgetic place 

the variety of threads that lelJ n ''°'''"* *° '^^ ^^''"^ of 5livet It i' 
PersonaddstothefinishedprX "''''^^°'"^"^f-f-e. Ever; 

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■ • home an^ "e;^^^^S:^Er^^ ^"^^ '^ '^ '" °- I 
trip to Turkey, but I also think of the tenlr k "' '^^ ^"9' ' ^^'"^ °f our 
out by God, as He pulls together t'dent 7 !"' "°'"" ^^^ '" ^^d day 
and beauty of Olivet comes as v^e are in '^ '"^ ^*^^- ^^^ strength 

pursuit Of an "Education with" Sn Xr '° ''^"^ "''^ ^^^ '" 
^Dr. John C Bowling 



1. President Bowling delivers an- 
other chapel-opening speech. 2. 
President Bowling participates in a 
chapel service by playing the conga 
drums. 3. Mrs. Jill Bowling is all 
smiles at an Olivet event. 4. Dr. 
Bowling and Marvin Jones take time 
for a picture during fall revival. 
5. Dr. Bowling speaks with convic- 
tion. 6. Dr. Bowling takes time to 
meet students Lindsey Bright, Rachel 
Bedell and Kyle Allen. 

PRESIDENT'S PAGE 11 




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Ptime between 

upon returning to «';"P"V°he lugging of suit- 

^Ue arranging of;°°^ .;;^^; g.eet each other 
cases, students found nie 9 ,^ ^^^ ^.^^ ^„ 

and catch up. For the fesn ^^^^rsatrons 

3,, a new *=>P«-" * ;: 3,ories and plans 
.evolved around su^mert. ^^^^^^^^ ^^^pp^^ 
fo, the semester to con^e ^^^^ ^^ 

Library. 






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1. Cody McGraw uses a 
different method to move-in. 2. 
Julie Scheele and Lauren Briggs 
team up to carry in the 
entertainment. 3. Brittani Jordan 
and Traci Robinson are ready to 
embark on their college journey. 



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14 FIRST WEEK 



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4. Delaney King kicks 
back while others do 
the cleaning. 5. Austin 
Mounts uses precision 
in fitting the pegs in 
just right. 6. Laura 
Fleschner says goodbye 
to her parents 7. 
Nathaniel Waller does 
his best to rearrange. 






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FIRST WEEK 15 



-^CK TO SClOOl PART/ 



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ASC decided to spice tilings up tliis year by 
putting on a blocl< party lield right on campus. 
With great music and food, students partied into 
the school year with the many fun activities pro- 
vided for them. Face painting, games, a human 
foosbail court, and an inflatable slide, obstacle 
course, and volleyball court were all used to 
celebrate the end of a great summer and look 
forward to an amazing academic year ahead. 



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1. James Dennis works his magic 
with the paintbrush on Faith 
Mingus. 2. Greg Cobb decides 
to go with a new look. 3. Kyle 
Lambright and Danny Liemann at- 
tempt a shot on goal against Ja- 
cob Barse. 4. Caitie Sweet uses 
her lung power. 5. Jeremy Keller 
quenches his craving for sugar. 
6. Students pause for a group 
pic. 7. Samantha Allen roughs it 
on the obstacle course 8. Lau- 
ren Finney, Abby Doud, and Katie 
McKeighart get all pumped up. 



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1 6 BACK TO §t:H<^OL PARTY 



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I8OLLIES FOLLIES SPORTS 



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L. Katie McElroy enjoys the 
lead fish and egg game despite 
:he blood. 2. The classes join 
:ogether during a game of buck- 
)uck. 3. Elen Sultan downs 
;hocolate pudding to support her 
:lass. 4. Evan Karg joins an 
.ntense game of tug-of-war. 5. 
'ravis Greene spikes the ball 
.nto senior territory. 6. 
Brittany Bailey and Mark Bell 
.ry to convince Jennifer Bouquet 
md Peter Foster that their fish 
-S in tact. 7. Antonio Marshall 
)reaks away from the pack. 8. 
'he freshmen pull their weight 
luring tug-of-war. 9. Emily 
ewis, Whitney Tatman and the 
ther junior girls give it their 
11. 



OLLIES FOLLIES SPONtS 19 




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1. Sarah Anderson, Whitney 
Allison, Danny Quanstrom, 
Anthony Sims, and David Parsons 
say peace! 2. Kelsey Sowards is 
Sandy! 3. Tony Gongaware, Dr. 
Jay, and John Radzimanowski are 
in the 90s! 4. Brad Sytsma takes 
up the cause! 5. Alex Ripberger 
impresses the crowd, Elvis style. 
6. Chris McCarty is the Fresh 
Prince. 7. Zarah Miller and 
Kenny Delaney MC the show. 8. 
Caitlin Charles, Caitlin Dodge, 
Mike Whiteside, and Kayla Koury 
say, "Beware!" 9. Miriam Edwards 
beams at the crowd. 



2OOLLIES FOLLIES TALENT 




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"Follies Through the Decades" was the theme for this 
year's Ollies Follies talent competition. Each class 
represented their decade as Kenny Delaney and 
Zarah Miller MCed the night wonderfully. The seniors, 
representing the 60s, encouraged the student body 
to "give peace a chance.'The juniors received a stand- 
ing ovation as they acted and danced out a whirlwind 
tour through the 90s. The sophomores chanted, 
"Beware," as they portrayed the 80s, and the freshmen 
gave a memorable performance of the 50s as they 
hand-jived their way into our hearts. And history was 
made as the sophomores claimed the victory, a feat 
that had only been accomplished once before. 

"oLLieS f oLUeS ^0? vias He !>ef mwe wvowvew-t- 
of ftd coLUSe caRecR, HoS f aR. I W^^ Ue pRNi- 
uae of wRec-t-twa He So9^vOt^^oRe cUSS ^f!>eo f oR 
He nm^-i ^ivov), m y^UcU i Wdi^ aoHoRita-now 4-0 
«>RNe a po^Uc saf e4-^ eoLf caR-f ow cawvpos.' Ue 
canftaRa!>eRie vOiH t^^W peeRS t>0Riv»6 SpoR-t-S, -(-aL- 
evi-(-, avii? pRoi>^c-fiov» pRoceSS v)aS a Real 4-Rea-f 3" 
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OLLIES FOLLIES TALENT 21 



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-^rom^mJ^^ Revoc 



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This year's Broadway Revue, directed by Emily Jacob- 
son and Kenny Delaney, was a hit with songs from 
"Ha irspray;"'Pi rates of Penzance," "Little Women," 
and many more. If not for Arissa Beck and her staff 
putting the make up on the performers, Lisa Jack- 
son and Kennedy Coopwood running the spotlight, 
Carter Ollervidez and Heidi Richardson placing and 
removing the microphones, Jake Smith's narrating 
voice, orTyler Hull running the sound, the buffet of 
Broadway songs would not have been possible. 

"rf y)e cue soov^^ 60'V5> vjeRe 
)AoT J^eRe, Uc AO^iev\ce cdoU v\oT 
iveAR OS, -^OT tf Ue peR^Rt^- 
eR$ voeRe v\ot lA^t, Ue AOPlev\ce 

MlOOU? V\0T SU>y^ op. fT is ML CDV\- 
v^ecre*?." - TfUR WLL 





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22 BROADWAY REVUE 



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1. Tyler Hull is confident as he 
runs the sound. 2. The men of 
"Pirates of Penzance" take their 
singing and dancing to the next 
level. 3. Jake Boss digs deep 
for "My Fair Lady." 4. The pit 5. 
Matt Kee expresses himself as he 
sings "Agony." 6. Sarah Yanchick 
and Luke Mingus play their roles 
well. 7. Jessica Porter gives it 
all she has. 8. Kelsey Sowards 
sings a solo while her background 
vocalists look on. 9. Brittany 
Bailey and Brian Welter perform 
"Love is Always Lovely in the 
End." 10. Laura DeMerrell and 
Elizabeth Bernhardt perform bril- 
liantly in their performance of 
"Les Miserables." 11. The sing- 
ers "wash those men right out of 
their hair." 12. In between con- 
ducting, Laura Kehoe makes time 
for her solo. 








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BROADWAY RSMUE 23 
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1. Ghedam Sultan partakes in the 
Chapman Hall afternoon fun. 2. Lin- 
coln Butler, Jake Heaton and Jerry 
Scheller joust in Nesbitt. 3. Resi- 
dents enjoy just chilling out. 4. 
Kristin Murray works diligently 
while enjoying a sucker. 5. Derek 
Berquist enjoys taking it easy in 
the dorms. 6. Sebastian Grochows- 
ki spends a relaxing afternoon in 
Hills. 7. Tim Weston, Meg Ledyard, 
Jon Kundrat and Kate Rojek hang 
out in the McClain lobby. 8. Stu- 
dents love hanging out in the Olde 
Oak apartments. 9. Freshman girls 
spend some time socializing between 
classes. 10. Mike Johnston spends 
his free time in the dorm gaming it 
up. 11. Reagan Taylor and Bethany 
Bacon spend time on some homework 
in the apartments . 



24 DORM LIFE 




rarely a dull moment. 

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DORM LIFE 25 



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1. Chelsey Downs and Laura Schaum- 
burg are a dirty mouth and Orbitz 



gum ! 



Adam Schick and Wes Sisoce 



have a storm-trooper and Jedi bond- 
ing moment. 3. Tayler St. Aubin, Nina 
Trisilla and Nicole Klein are a cute 
Cat in the Hat and Thing 1 and Thing 
2. 4. James Sly, Kami Vander Velde, 
Amy Davis, Matt Walker, Melissa Cox, 
Mary Phillips and Kenny Huber repre- 
sent High School Musical! 5. Caitlin 
Gidcumb hugs her tree, Phil Colling, 
as a tree hugger. 6. Kati Downs and 
Melissa Brashaw get an extra load of 
laundry done as a washer and dryer. 
7. Brittany Hengesh, Austin Hill, 
Emily Hay, Amanda Mazzaro and James 
Smit are the cast of Scooby-Doo. 8. 
The Last Supper group stole the show 
and the prize! 

2 6 CANDY COSTUME FEST 







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CANDY COSTUME FE^l 27 




1. Brianne Tuinstra dives for the ball. 2. Pop 
concert singers fill the room with music. 3. Mar- 
shall Fraley blocks his defender while running 
down the field. 4. Anna Kolber defends herself and 
the ball from an opposing team member. 5. Courtney 
Hehn looks for help from her teammates. 6. Mea- 
gan Lamping is determined to get around the op- 
posing team member to score a goal. 7. Rodrigue 
Fontem races for the ball. 8. Dwayne Mills talks 
to Ashley James as Brock Taylor waits to propose. 
9. Rashad Mitchell gets ready to pass the ball to 
another teammate. 






28 HOMECOMING 





'™'^?^^/;,c; . time of remembrapce. It reconnected 
r,er,rndTpXrwitMor...udents.nd.ost,.- 

Ji*ea together in ^o^^;^^^^^^'^^ 

reTe^re^rK^^^^^^^^^^ 

"r^XtrXT.'lthe.Ho.ec^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

aaS.Ther.stha,fwasad.^^^^^^^^ 

pulled away in the second half to d "cn t"e g 

the sell-out crowd watch ^^^If'^'^^^'^'^.^.g halftime, a 

also witnessed a romantic «<^dfg P °P°=; ^u^g^f ^^ ^^^^ 

piece of something great. 




HOMECOMING 2 9 



CDR OWAiTk> V\ 

; With the theme of "Captivating/the Homecominq 
: Coronation of 2008 was a night like no other. The 
: stage was set with tall, white columns, contrasted 
i against a pink background. The ladies of the court 
;- listened to words from their parents, answered 
questions about their time at Olivet and walked 
along the runway. The theme verse for the Corona- 
tion ceremony was Isaiah 62:3, and the queen of the 
night, Brooklin Soulia, a senior psychology, religion 
and philosophy major from Flushing, Michigan was 
a wonderful representation of the words in that 
Scripture. 

"^oiwecoiwfwe coRovja+iov» v)a$ a ^cao-f-rf oL 
Ti^Toi^Kevy^: v^iciou om^-\o^ '["^^■^ Ha-f- Afe^U6«.^ej> ut LKes of f k^ $pe- 

„ ' ^^^ ^^'^'OR cuss v)otweM. 6c^+m6 f o coRowa- 

'*« ■■ -^-low vii6i.-f v)as !>ef wi+eLV a Lo4- of y)oRK ^o-(- 

v»0M) •fi.a^- fwe uim P0+ i-f oM i feel UKe'i 
cooL!> !>o awvHme.'" -A!wav)!>a srcwvS 








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30 CORONATION 



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1. Alex Rodriguez escorts queen 
Brooklin Soulia. 2. The court cele- 
rates their way offstage. 3. Emily 
Poling answers an interview ques- 
tion. 4. Lauren Green smiles behind 
ler bouquet. 5. Megan Reed performs 
the special music. 6. John Keat- 
ing assists Katie Brashaw, the 2007 
lomecoming queen. 7. Ian Cole, Wade 
McCann, Daniel Rodriguez, Alex Ro- 
-driguez and Matt Lyle are the es- 
3rts for the night. 8. Emily Poling 
and Lauren Green enjoy Coronation. 
I 9. Hillary Cole, Emily Poling, Ra- 
chel Bedell, Brooklin Soulia and 
Lauren Green smile with past queen 
Katie Bradshaw. 10. Rachel Bedell 
applies lip gloss. 11. Ian Cole 
helps his wife, Hillary Cole, down 

the stairs. 



pioTo UKev\ -W: 3^t^ife ^RW^ 




P^TO TAKew W VMClOU 0VfV»6T0V> 



CORONATION 31 



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Friday afternoons and Saturdays, the 
Red Room and Game Room become two 
of the busiest places on campus. The quad 
becomes a court for games of catch in the 
( spring and a battlefield for snowball fights 

in the winter. After a week full of quizzes, 
I exams, papers, and a slew of homework due 
I the weekends seem to be what students live 
for. 

f OR ivaRj>-M)0RKW6 $-(-\}!>eM-(-$ LfKe 

CTovjioR Av)t>Rey) yja^tLeR, M)eeKftv»j>$ 
PRo>((5>e -f (twe -f RcaaR^e. «ov) s^vo- 
!>a^S i eo 4-0 aoRcii av)r> ewcrov He 
LacK of «>ewvav»5>s f roiw saooLM)oRK." 
-Avj!>Rey) y)aiiLeR 




me,wws 



1. Ben Jackson plays a concert at Romer' s Bakery. 2. 
Two freshman guys get tangled up in a game of Twister 
at the Fall Festival. 3. Kelsi Jones and Kyle Peacock 
spend some time in the Olde Oak lounge. 4. A group of 
girls gather in to smile for the camera. 5. Loren Hoek- 
stra, Austin Senior, John Wright and Andrew Rice hang 
out at a coffee shop. 6. Karen Ritter and Natalie Be- 
gick enjoy an event held at the Warming House. 7. Cami 
Jahn and Courtney Lindsay relax and surf the Web. 8. 
Andrew Clark shoots for the goal during an intense game 
of indoor soccer. 9. Beth Hiatt spends some extra time 
playing foosball in the Red Room. 10. A group of se- 
niors spend time at one of their last football games. 



32 WEEKENDS 











weekhMds 33 



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AW^TOWf Of 6(W 



The lights, sound, props, a rustic set, and a 
united, talented cast was the scene at this yearV 
fall play, "Anatomy of Gray." The nine cast mem- 
bers created a bond that was evident on stage 
A story of life and death gripped the audience ' 
as the actors and actresses performed It was 
an unforgettable story, and the many hours of 
practicing, building the set, preparing for sound 
and perfecting the lights were all evident in ' 
"Anatomy of Gray." 

"i*+ M)as a uao-f If oL s^or^ of Life av)j> 
Dean. av)!> eveRvov»e cav» pick a aaRac-f eR 
avir> ReLafe -f o Heiw m soiwe M)a>/ " 
-saRa^ Uv\v\tv\^ 




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11 



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6. Kenneth Delaney is being 
freed of a kidney stone while 
Stephen Wolfe checks Abby Doud 
for the "mark." 7. Janel Fil- 
beck lets Stephen Wolfe listen 
to the life inside her. 8. Ken- 
neth Delaney cringes as Aris- 
sa Beck applies the necessary 
eye liner. 9. Merrick Robison 
throws up hands in celebra- 
tion. 10. The cast poses after 
a spectacular performance. 




FALL PLAY 35 




^^^^^^^.^sf^mset^ 






•fi^fix-i?-"'' '"^ 



t^e^i^liv 





present^,on from rh^BR,er>f of Music 

(onger than Handel's f^m^^ and fcJsl 
religious theme, vvas.flf^^^^&t^^^- 
13, V42, by the Musiar Academy of Du^^ 

This year Messiah was fatfermsl Friday 
Decernb^ 5, ar,d Saturday, December 6 
Chrysalis Women's Choir, Orpheus Choir Testa- 
ment Men's Choir and thltgfctettSra 
joined together for the ^^■3™^™''-'^"™^™ 

ensemble P'»^^}f)Mamfmt<ki^iMn 
the year a^ then came m^, the week of 
the conceit (oprac** ■ 





fi^^-mt^ ^::iiift.5T«iw«p»'» ■ 




^^mmm 




• • 





HO^TNWW tfc 7I*k ^«f4A*eew 



1. Jenna Dickey t^kes centerstage 
to perform her solo. 2. The full 
ensemble delivers a sound perfor- 
mance together. 3. Josh Severs 
concentrates on his part. 4. Ash- 
lie Mclntire smiles as she fills 
the room with music during her 
solo. 5. Emily Jacobson stands 
behind the mic while singing to 
the crowd. 6. Dr. Jeff Bell leads 
the ensemble through the pieces . 
7. Elisabeth Peulausk shows her 
pride after the performance. 8. 
A group of girls in the choir 
sings beautifully together. 9. 
Luke Frame and Reube/i Lillie lift 
up their voices to the audience. 
10. Josh Woods plays with deter- 
mination in his eyes. 11. Brian 
Kosek plays with the rest of the 
cello section. 



-*--«-r- — ^,^^^^ 



MESSIAH 37 







91010 i?>Ke\rt -W: cs^ttvie wRKec 




CjvRiSTt^S WAMtl 




ichael Buble sang "White Christmas" over nne 
speaker system, Shannon Battershell and Evan 
Karg took the stage to welcome everyone to the 
2008 Christmas Banquet, "A Classy Christmas: A 
Night in Black and White." The tables were aglow 
with small candies and set with sparkling silver 
and black Christmas ornaments and beads. Mark 
Williams entertained the crowd with his running 
theme of the fact that there are stupid things all 
\ over. This year's Christmas banquet was the per- 
I feet Saturday night escape from the stress of finals 

for a night of relaxation, laughter, and fun with 
* good friends. 

{ 

' ^eaRj lU 4-a3US avjD cevj-feRpteceS vOoRKe«> 

piv\v)eM cooRSeS twa5>e «-(- evew cLaS^ieRJ vO^va-f 
a ^Rea-i- voaw -(-o ew«> He SewveS-«-eR.'" 
-SaRa L€.vjv)ovj 

38 CHRISTMAS BANQUET 






i't,» # 



c.^ 



flOJo 



'^^^'^ ^•- o^mfe 



^JRKee 




Ill 




PiDTO T?iKew -w: 3Mvvie !>oRKee 



1. The comedian entertains the 
crowd. 2. These handsome men dou- 
ble as photographers for the eve- 
ning. 3. The night's decorations 
were full of class. 4. Christy 
Sunberg, Alii Smith, Andrea Bowne, 
Kelly Hodge, Alyssa Gee, Brook- 
lin Soulia and Megan Taylor pose 
in black and red. 5. Jacob Adder- 
ley and Sara Lennon enjoy their 
pictures. 6. Jason Chew and Katie 
McElroy enjoy the comedian to- 
gether. 7. Zach Harvey, John Short 
and Kyle Walker serenade the crowd 
with Christmas carols. 8. Mary 
Margaret Reed, Candice Galvin, 
Tanicia Rouse-Nelson and Angela 
Rivas look beautiful. 

, CHRISTMAS BANQUET 



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Cher Ami is a local band made up of Olivet students, but dedicated to tlieir music and passions out- 
side of school perimeters. The band's name is French, meaning "Dear Friend." 

Olivet student Alex McGrath leads the band. He is a junior and is the lead singer and plays rhythrrj 
guitar. He also "whistles, plucks and strums the guitar, and provides the band with whale communicatior! 
and exceptional height," he jokes. 

Alex describes bandmate senior Ben Jackson as, "a multi-instrumentalist at heart, and his heart is ir 
the right place. He provides sounds on pianos, guitars, bells, accordions, melodicas, and anything else h^ 
can get his hands on (don't forget claps and snaps)." 

Senior Jacki Warren does backup vocals, various percussion and synthesizer, and according to Alex 
"she soothes them with the tone of her voice, as well as joining in the celebration on the glockenspiel, key:j 
and various percussive tools." 

Last but not least, junior Owie Ocampo plays leadguitar. Alex says that,"Owie plays sweet jazzy gu 
tar and provides the band with a multi-cultural experience." I 

The band's genre is known as experimental folk - regular folk music with a modern twist - combinecj 
with band members' ideas. "The songs we play are about experiences, and when we perform them the 
are unique experiences for each listening individual. In other words, we bring everything we have, yoi 
bring everything you have, and we'll share together," Alex says. 

Although the students met at Olivet, they are not an official Olivet band. They are very much thei 
own entity and committed to their music and band. The group met in 2007 and has since been "a grou|: 
of friends who all loved music and creating things. We decided to make beautiful soundscapes and sing 
harmony." 

The group plays in many different areas and venues. They often play in coffee shops, art gallerie; 
sidewalks, stairwells, bakeries, rooftops, treetops and train stops. 

Leader Alex McGrath says that "the band means a golden opportunity to do the things I love mos 
with the people I love most. As a band we are larvae in a constant state of metamorphosis, growing out c 
ourselves and even learning how to share." 




40 FEATURE STORY: CHER^MT 

01. 





FEATURE. .STOKY: CHER AMI 41 



STOt^V A'^RO^l> 



Students had the opportunity to learn outside of the small Bourbon- 
nais cannpus again this year. Some traveled to Ecuador. Others went to 
China. No matter where they went, though, the students got first-hand 
experience in a different country with a different language and a differ-? 
ent culture. 

For students who wanted to earn Spanish credit, Dr. Vicki Trylong, 
professor of Modern Languages, "highly recommends" two programs, 
the Nazarene International Language Institute (NILI) in Quito, Ecuador, 
and the Latin American Studies Program (LASP) in San Jose, Costa Rica. 

Other options offered by Olivet were programs in Australia, China, 
Latin America, the Middle East, Oxford, Russia and Uganda. Students 
interested in film and journalism could also choose to study in Wash- 
ington D.C. and Los Angeles. 



"i-f 1$ a cTo^ 4-0 vOoRK vjf-«-iv He$e S-i-oi^e-w-f $ ^m See Uo\^ 
iwociv -i-u^i uaRv) aw5> wva-(-oRe as a ReSoL-(- of -(-iveiR S-f \)!>^ 
a^Roa!> expeRiev^ceS. T^^eiR s^v\isu pRof eSSoRS aRe aLvOa^S 
cwvpReSSei? v)tU Uo\i iwociv -i-UiR Lavj^oaee Skills iwvpRo^e m 
sociv a SZvoR-f- -(-iiwe. " -PR. view tr"VLov)6 





a 




1. Melissa Fett and friends in the International Business In- 
stitute's summer program cram into a phone booth. 2. Kristi 
Lam stares at the beautiful horizon in China. 3. Jamie Dur- 
kee strikes a pose in Vatican City. 4. Mary Grace Russo spends 
time with a kangaroo during her study abroad in Australia. 5. 
Ashley Catapano embraces the children from Ecuador. 



42 STUDY ABROAD 




6. Ashley Catapano, Ben Jack- 
son, Jacki Warren, Lauren 
Green, Conrad Wineland, Alex 
McGrath, Sarah Beth Anderson 
and Elizabeth Hernandez smile 
for the camera with a group of 
people from Ecuador. 7. Jacki 
Warren poses by Basillica in 
Quito, Ecuador. 8. Ian Cole 
marvels at the beauty of the 
Sahara Desert 9. Ashley Cata- 
pano, Lauren Green and Eliza- 
beth Hernandez jump for joy 
for the study abroad programs . 
10 , Tracey Wangler takes a 
break from reporting at the 
Washington Journalism Center, 



STUDY ABROAD 



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sirMm»t(i9'fb 



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God works in mysterious ways. He reveals Himself at home, at work, at school and even on vacation. Rachel Forshee 
traveled to Ecuador this past summer for six weeks. While she was there, her world was completely reversed. She left the Unit( 
States as a materialistic perfectionist, but came back a loving and trusting follower of God. 

Rachel went to Ecuador with the Nazarene International Language Institute, or NILI, for a Spanish study abroad progra 
Before she left, Rachel was concerned mainly with her own well-being and had a hard time trusting others. She was afraid to 
people into her life. She spent her time perfecting herself rather than getting to know God and His people. "I wanted the upp 
hand so [people] couldn't hurt me," Rachel said. She was always more concerned with work and tasks than relationships in gej- 
eral. 

She went to Ecuador expecting to learn about Spanish culture. In her eyes, the trip was going to be fun and a time to 'St 
away from everyone back home. She did not expect her life to be changed forever, but living in Ecuador was where her translr- 
mation began. Rachel remembered one man who was very sick, but had no money to pay for health care. She urged the ma 
to go restand take care of himself "I wanted to help him,"shesaid.That was the problem: It was always about her. "How can I 
help?" she remembered thinking. "Me, me, me." 

But God began to work on Rachel's heart. Through the lives of the seminary students, she saw how to truly trust God 
with an open heart. And those sincere, forgiving relationships with people are how others will see we are disciples of Christ, h 
until you can love people without limits can you understand the unconditional love God demonstrated toward us. "Seeing th 
blind trust the students have in God showed me that fear of being hurt is really only me not allowing God to hold me in His 
arms," Forshee said. 

Rachel went to God broken, and He healed her. When she came home, she was completely different. She wanted to 
focus on relationships because God was calling her to them. "I heard God tell me 'Rachel, help those who are struggling.' So tht 
is what I am going to do,"she said. 

Her life now revolves around God and His plan for her life. It is not about what she wants anymore. It is about what He 
wants. "People's needs in their lives are more important to me than anything else,"she said. "My life now is about fellowship a 
bringing people into Christ." 



44 Feature Story: CHANGED IN ECUADOR 



i > 




Feature Story: CHANGED IN ECUADOR 45 




SPiRiTOAil 




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M\^ veT UhS t^hyvi wvew^eRS, 
hyf\^ ALL TU wvew^cRS of lU 

ARe 0\Ae ^05?^, so ALSO IS CjvRiST. 
t CORiY^T{viAY\S t^:t^ CV^AS^> 



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SplRlTOM Ufe CDOY^Ci 







46 SPIRITUAL LIFE COUNCIL 
I I 








SO'^WfTT® PJOTO 




A part ofwhat makes ONU unique is the 

Prayer Warriors tinere IZ P'"^"""' ^"ch as 
g-thopportu^^rstrerrror."'^^'""^' 

- Mma wfeMsaRftUi 




Sil'M»rTTe!> MOTO 





>. 



1. VP of Spiritual Life 
Evan Karg gets down to 
business. 2. Jennifer Mc- 
Clellan enjoys herself 
on the spiritual life 
retreat. 3. The members 
of SLC pose for a group 
shot. 4. Sarah Clark and 
other spiritual life mem- 
bers kick back in the 
sunshine. 5. Mike Denny 
gets crazy. 6. Members of 
SLC jump at the chance to 
goof around for the cam- 
era. 7. Bethany Chris- 
tiansen listens intent- 
ly. 8. Annie Lowry, Mike 
Denny, Evan Karg, Kent 
Davenport and Aaron Reed 
take a class chaplains 
photo . 




so'twvnres? ?tDTo 



SO'tWiTTe? piiDTO 






SPIRITUAL LIFE COUNCIL 49 




f ijsTo >v<e« '^■. -fc^cK ft«e 




PtoTo UKem -5V: sack fi^ye 



PJOTO UKCV* -9V: BACK fRVe 



1. Rachel Forshee publicly 
declares her freedom and pur- 
pose in Christ. 2. Gregg Cobb 
grooves for the Lord. 3. Jona- 
than Burkey leads the student 
body in praise. 4. Peter Fos- 
ter reads Scripture. 5. Chap- 
lain Michael Benson senses the 
Lord's presence. 6. Megan Reed 
cries out to the Lord in song. 



PtoTo TAKew TfV: ZACK fR^e 



CHAPEL 



f o^,peJXplt*"'^^"*- 
Dr. John r R^, I '^'^'< W"5on 
Benson focS^V-^.Dr.M,chae,. 

"^'"9 our resource. f!''°f'*fe'^"d 
for Christ ^^'*°'"^P« others 




CUhHi 




PtoTO TAKew -?V: BACK fR^e 





PtoTO TAKew -5V: SACK fRve 



li 



ALL ReViWAL 





tember 2 24 2008 q "n r" '''"" ^^^ ^ep- 

at College Chu ch n L h '' "''"'"9 '^'''^^^ 
were added to ^co^J^^.^I^'^S -™ce chairs 

gathered. He focused^r„ "°"* *''« 

to live a Victor ousife °" "'°"''9'"9 believers 
ing a stand foCh?nH '° '"'"^"'"^ ^y mak- 
toHir^. ^''"''""'^^^trendering your Will 

^«*>Ue, (WoTiMs PBoo!! ^ ^*- -*W 



KfW 



1. Professor Mark 
Holcomb lifts up a 
student in prayer. 

2 . A group of girls 
make their praises 
known. 3. President 
John C. Bowling 
makes his point. 4. 
Marvin Jones pas- 
sionately leads 
worship . 



'^Pt^^ 



F?^LL' REVIVAL 51 









P{£>TO UKftV^ Tf: ARlSSAi "^eCK 






■•"'■■■'fi/'iitx.v' 



1 . Brittany Thomas 
sings passionately. 2. 
David Mantel bows down 
in worship. 3. Meagan 
Olds lifts up His name 
in worship. 4. Cait- 
lin Dodge leads on the 
keyboard 5. Alejandro 
Escobar brings the beat 
to worship. 



52 



PARTY WITH JESUS 




PART/ v)iT^ cyesos 



-r 



/ 





9 



PtoTO T?iKeV^ T/: ARiSS^ 'teCK 



6. The band 
leads students 
into worship. 

7. Tim Jeffer- 
ies focuses on 
the right chords . 

8. A group sings 
aloud in harmony. 

9. Christopher 
Tolbert sings 
out with raised 
hands. 10. Amidst 
the crowd, this 
student seeks God 
with her every- 
thing. 




PARTY WITH JESUS 53 



f 



5k 



1. Shaun McClel- 
lan worships in song. 
2. Dr. Scott Daniels 
speaks his message. 
3. The band leads the 
congragation in wor- 
ship. 4. Kelsey So- 
wards and Whitney Al- 
lison sing in worship. 
5. Students enjoy the 
presence of God. 




^Touy<ev.^T,t.STevw.v.sev. 




ptoTo UKev\ VI: Tm STepivA\rtsev\ 



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WINTER REVIVAL 



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Pk)To UKew -^V: Titw srepwiwsevi 



,^;;,7,'^f^'^f«t"red music by worship 

--potentialforchan i heSr' 
GodtcTr"'*°''^'"'-^"d accepted 



y)i\ATeR RCViWAt 




6. An evening ser- 
vice in College Church 
brought in many stu- 
dents. 7. Jake Randall 
plays with the worship 
band. 8. Students re- 
spond to an evening al- 
t^r call. 



PlDTO TAKfilrt -^V: MW. STePW>WSeV\ 



k 




WINTER REVIVAL 55 










1. Alex Escobar serves dinner to the 
kids at the Salvation Army. 2. The 
People's Church college group cel- 
ebrate fall. 3. Heidi Curtis spends 
time with children at the Salvation 
Army. 4. Hannah Scott helps teach 
children about God. 5. The worship 
team leads worship at Mateno Church of 
the Nazarene. 6. Chris DeMerell leads 
worship at the Parlor. 7. Kyle Fel- 
lows and ? lead worship in Manteno. 
8. Grace Mantarian helps teach Sunday 
school and shows her craft skills. 
9. Jamie Hsu and his People's church 
group have a blast in Chicago. 10. 
Erica Grossman and Jaclyn Bollinger at 
spring retreat with 5th grade girls. 

5 6 LOCAL CHURCH MINISTRY 




9k>10 T>iKCV\ VI: V\\Ck>\je. OVf\rt&TOV\ 



lOCM C^ORC^ WVi\Ai$TRV 




The spiritual life at Olivet blossomed as student 
chose to attend churches around the Kankakee area 

on Sunday mornings. River Valley Christian Fellow- 
ship was a popular church that many students chose 
to attend and become involved in. Kankakee First 
Church also attracted many students, as well as the 
wel known College and University Campus Church- 
es. A new church that students began to attend 
this year was People's Church. All around the area as 
students attended church they were able to grow 
closer to God and one another. 

"Mm He oppoR4-ov)j-f>/ +0 3e (vivouej) m He 
PaRLoR seR^.ce a-f coLLeae aoRa «.as 3eev» a 
mt ^LeSSme iv\ twv Life, v^o-f owLV is UfS 
oppoRf ovi,4-v a 3LesSme, r^ ,s aiSo a^ atwat^e 
LeaRvj(V)s expeRiewce. lU S-f-af f a^. coL- 
Uee cmck (S !wa!>e op of iwavjv URtSi- 
f oLLoM)eR$' M)i,o se-f av) exceLLew+ ex- 
aiwPU f OR aiL of He people of coiLeee 
aoRa -fo f oLLoy).« -y)e$Lev spRa^ue 



PtoTO TAKftW T/: iKK fJWe 



El li i8 




LOCAL CHURCH MINISTRY 57 



1. Emily McDowell 
helps her buddies 
with a craft dur- 
ing her time at the 
Shapiro Developmen- 
tal Center. 2. As the 
leader of Best Bud- 
dies, Anastasia White 
enjoys spending time 
with the buddies . 3 . 
Erica Ziverts shares a 
laugh with her friends 
at Shapiro. 4. Casey 
Vaughn and her buddy, 
Andy, pose for a pho- 
to. 




pjoTo ih\(&f\ ^: Tm STep^Av\sev\ 



> 1 



"^eS-f 305>»>ie$ 







58 BEST BUDDIES 



m 




;;^rw:^=T«*^*''^'" 



Anastasia White and the rest of the 
Best Buddies show the love of Christ 
through bowling and throwing 
birthday celebrations. For the resi 
dents of the Shapiro Developmental 
Center, the fellowship is a much- 
appreciated gift, but they're not the 
only ones benefiting from the expe- 
rience. As in all friendships, Anastasia 
finds that they get as much out of 
the relationship as their buddies do, 
and considers it a privilege to spend 
time with them. 

nu 3\)5>i>ie$ UGtU^ op CvOivew 
■{-Wi See os>-. i-t- (S sociv a :yoV 
■(-0 ^a^e Soiweowe so exci-f ep -f o 
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1 . students involved in 
Compassionate Ministries 
pose for a photo. 2. 
Caitlin Crum and Allison 
Reed help move furniture 
in a local high school so 
the group could clean and 
paint. 3. Carrie Booth and 
Lauren Versweyveld frost 
cookies for a local do- 
mestic violence shelter' s 
Christmas party. 



The goal of Compassionate Minis- 
tries is to be the hands and feet of 
Jesus to our community. 

They have helped with clothing 
drives, canned food drives, organiz- 
ing and cleaning at Center of Hope 
and carrying boards at Salvation 
Army. Members participate in CROP 
Walk to raise money for people 
who don't have food and Trick-or- 
Treat so Others Can Eat to collect 
food for others, and also help with 
Christmas parties for needy fami- 
lies. 




' -I 



m 



COMPASSIONATE MINISTRIES 



59 




VtoTO 



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5>($cipLeR$ 







Bible Witness Camp provides tlie 
l<ids of Hopkins Park with an op- 
portunity to learn about God. The j 
Disciplers, whose weekly volunteer 
work keeps the camp going, dedi- 
cate a significant amount of time 
and energy to ensure that the kids 
have a great time as they learn Bible 
verses and play games together. 

One of the highlights ofthe year for 
the Disciplers is giving out Bibles to 
the kids, some of whom didn't have 
a Bible in their homes before receiv- 
ing the Disciplers' gift. 



1. Juliana DiRienzo shares a 
lesson with the kids. 2. Kris- 
tin Thompson enjoys her time at 
camp. 3. Marygrace Russo and 
some of the kids say ^cheese' 
for the camera. 4. The Disci- 
plers gather in for a group 
shot . 






60 DISCIPLERS 








%^^v\eitlS 







,l0T0TM«!»W.Tfl.St«lW«« 




The Evangels show love to the resi- 
dents of Provena Our Lady of Grace 
Nursing Home by giving them the gift 
of friendship. Through this simple gift, 
the Evangels bring joy into the resi- 
dents' lives, and create for themselves 
memorable and enriching experienc- 
es. They were able to make a signifi- 
cant impact this year with the efforts 
of more than 20 committed members ^ 
visiting the nursing home weekly. 

feet appRec(a-(-e5>, Lo\fe!>, ni^p 
avjf> Re$pec-(-e»> ^'V spevji>ivja -(-(twe 
vOcH -(-2veiw~. 4- aLK(we vOl-(-iv -i-Uft^ 
avit> sumviG, ooR Ll^^es voiH -t-iv^iw." 
-savjM Ri-«-(-eR 



1. As VP of spiritual life, Evan 
Karg spends, time serving with one of 
the spiritual life groups. 2. Ashley 
Woodburn enjoys a casual conversation 
with a Provena resident. 3. Abby Ben- 
tie and Stephanie Cox prepare a craft 
for the residents to enjoy. 4. Marcia 
Strong and Sandi Ritter fellowship 
with their friends at Provena. 5. The 
group of Evangels takes time out of 
their service to take a photo. 



EVANGELS gl 



LcfeSov^a 




Lifesong member Brad Morse is 
clear on the group's mission: to lead 
worship, not to simply perform mu- 
sic. Brad, who is humble about his 
talent, recognizes that the quality of 
the music is secondary to the more 
important goal of worshiping the 
Lord, which can be accomplished 
regardless of ability. 

Even though he admittedly experi- 
ences stage fright when playing,. 
Brad. believes that God has used the 
experience to bless him and the 
other members, as well as to help 
them grow spiritually. 











62 LIFESONG 




1. Jacob Schmidt, Jesse Briles 
and Julie VanDewoestyne sing 
during practice. 2. Jeff Hin- 
kley keeps the rhythm. 3. One 
of the Lifesong groups engages 
in worship while practicing. 4. 
Sarah Hamminga and Tara Hartley 
play and sing during practice. 
5. Andrew Schmitz does a quick 
devotional before practice. 6. 
Alexander Sniegowski and Mike 
Flowers use their talents by 
performing with Lifesong. 7. 
Sarah Hamminga, Shara Souther- 
land, Brad Morse, Kelcey Snyder, 
en Burch and Victoria Means re- 
hearse during a group session. 




LIFESONG 63 







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Daniel Sheets and the other 
mennbers of Mission Support have taker 
it upon themselves to raise awareness 
about mission work happening around 
the world. They've done so using unique 
events such as the Broken Bread meal^;|r 
which they ate the same porridge serve' 
by missionaries in Africa. 

The group also aims to make a direct 
difference in the lives of missionaries, 
their families and the Church as a whole 
through prayer. 

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Riewce a-(- Leas-f- a -(-aS-t-c of avjo+^v 
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64 MISSION SUPPORT 




1. Daniel Sheets focuses during 
Mission Support meeting. 2. Cas< 
Carr uses a presentation to infi 
the group. 3. Professor Tim Mer 
cer, Kate McGill and Jack Chris 
tensen listen intently. 4. The 
Mission Support team understand: 
what it means to be supportive. 






i 



Prayer is essential for mairitair^in 
strong relationship with God, and 
the Prayer Warriors are well aware of 
this. In their bi-weekly nneetings they 
bring their praises and concerns to 
the Lord and enjoy fellowship with 
each other. 

This year, they saw God move in big 
ways: healing ailnnents and bringing 
comfort to those they lifted up to 
Him. The Warriors hosted a 24-Hour 
Prayer event in the spring semes- 
ter, an incredible experience for all 
involved. 




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PRa^eR 



1. Luverta Reames and 
Lisa Jackson hang ban- 
ners for an event . 2 . 
Members of the club make 
posters for the 24-Hour 
Prayer event. 3. The 
group poses in Kelley 
Prayer Chapel. 4. Angela 
Lee writes her prayer 
during a meeting. 











^,T»ST«W»«»" 



PRATER WARRIORS 65 
1) 







1. The Dominican Republic team 
pushes their bus out of a rut af- 
ter a long day. 2. Jennifer Mc- 
Clellan informs students about 
2009 trips. 3. Kristen Watson 
spends quality time with kids in 
Denver. 4. Rachel Small walks with 
an African woman in Lusaka, Zam- 
bia. 5. Football players help out 
with roof work in Memphis. 6. Mary 
Mercer, Jared Bouton, Elizabeth 
Hernandez, Tim Daughtery, Adri- 
anna Espinoza, Ashley Hyatt, Tania 
Pavlovcik, Soledad Rodriguez and 
Sabrina Seed take a group photo in 
Korea. 7. Pam Tanis, Diane Mi- 
chel, Joyce Kang, Samantha Allen, 
Kenn Knisley, Casey Bloom, Jessica 
Sowden, Kristen Watson and Jenni- 
fer McClellan enjoy their day in 
the mountains while in Denver. 8. 
Megan Schwind spends time with the 
children in Dominican Republic. 

66 MISSIONS IN ACTION 




Missions in Action is a group tliat truly lives up 
to its title.Through planning nnissions trips to 
places all over the globe, they've enabled Olive- 
tians to make an innpact in the lives of many who 
live far outside of the Olivet bubble. From bang- 
ing hammers to running programs for kids, Isaac 
Gilmore and the rest of those participating in the 
MIA program were able to do God's work while 
enjoying fellowship and seeing the world. 

"TiveRe iS a Lo-f i vieep +0 vOoRk ov\ wv^SeLf 
SpiRi+oaLU avjt> pRof eSSiovoaLL^ -(-o ^e-f- 
■(-eR UI9 -(-^oSe i SeR^c. Ti^iS 4- Rip opevje«> 
fici e^eS -(-0 -i-Ut ReaLi-f^ of M)iva-(- (+ is -f 
SeRVe awp Uo\i iiwpoR-(-avi-(- (-f 1$ -t-o "Se SeRi- 
o>)S aw!> $piR»-(-oaLU pRepaRe5>." -tll^.ne.^l^ 
iieRwavi5>eB. 













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MISSIONS IN ACTION 67 




1. Sara Wantz and Sarah 
Staal bare the cold to 
put signs up for Sanc- 
tity of Life week. 2. 
President of OFL, Elena 
Norman, talks with the 
director of the preg- 
nancy center while vol- 
unteering. 3. The 01- 
ivetians for Life pose 
for a group photo. 




oLNe-(-iaw$ f OR Life 





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Elena Norman and her fellow 
Olivetians for Life aren't just raising 
picket signs to stand against abor- 
tion. They're taking an active stand 
for the pro-life cause by volunteer- ■ 
ing at the Kankakee Pregnancy Crisis 
Center and hosting demonstrations 
to inform their peers about abortion 
impact and how it runs contrary to 
God's Word. 

Their mission is derived from 
Proverbs 3 1 : 8-9, which says to "speal 
up for those who cannot speak 
for themselves." Elena and friends 
enacted this verse in a powerful way 
through their contributions to the 
Sanctity of Life week on campus. 

"Ue oL-f «twa-(-e soaL of oLi^e- 
-(-iaw$ f OR L»f e 6 -(-0 ^t i-U 
U'imS av)!> f ee-f- of iStS^ tw 
PRo-Lif e iSSoeS." -etevja v\oRt#l^ 



68 



OLIVETIANS FOR LIFE 



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Led by student leaders Bethany 
Christiansen and Amanda 
Roach, Omega drama group 
members show God's love 
through drama. After practic- 
ing as a whole group, members 
divide into teams to travel 
throughout the region and 
also perform in chapel. Omega 
shares the Gospel through 
drama at youth services, con- 
ferences, retreats and Sunday 
morning services. 



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1. The Omega team and members 
from Lifesong pose for a pic- 
ture while on their retreat. 
-. Christina Lindsay, Elizabeth 
White and Tanicia Rouse-Nelson 
pray with all of their might 
luring a skit. 3. Brian Welter, 
•-manda Roach and Meredith Hoppe 
tjoy being leaders in Omega. 4. 
;rek Liechty, Matt Upshaw, Mer- 
iith Hoppe and Heather Terhorst 
perform a skit for their peers 
while on retreat. 







OMEGA 



69 



1. Members of S.O.S. look around an aban- 
doned building where some of the homeless 
live. 2. The group serves food and spends 
time with the homeless. 3. Matthew Lyle, 
Samantha Allen, Frannie Gantner, Caitie 
Sweet, Katy Booker, Faith Hatalla, Sarah 
DiMonte and John Michael Jurica pose to- 
gether . 





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The acronym S.O.S. denotes an em#i 
gency, and the problenn addressed fc 
the mennbers of Save Our Streets is . , 
certainly a pressing issue. They are at 
tacking the problenn of honnelessnes 
in our surrounding connmunities by, 
raising awareness through activities 
ike Homeless Week, a well-know an 
nual event on campus, and through 
their volunteer work. 

II 
This year S.O.S. assisted the Fourth II 

Presbyterian Church in Chicago and 
the Chicago Methodist Temple with 
their ministries to the homeless, and; 
volunteered at several homeless she: 
ters and soup kitchens in the Kanka- 
kee area. . ! _ L_ _ IllUI I-- ^ 



70 S.O.S 



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1 . The helpers and 
kids pose for a group 
photo. 2. Kelsey 
Moreau spends time 
with one of the girls. 
3. Katelyn Dean enjoys 
spending time with her 
friend. 4. Anna Kend- 
rick assists a child 
while making sock pup- 
pets . 



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Under the leadership of Erin 
Sandozand Katelyn Dean, Ur- 
ban Children's Ministry reaches 
out to children, ages 2 to 1 7, in 
the surrounding connmunities. 
From carving. pumpl<ins to bak- 
ing Christnnas cookies, students 
lead the kids through engaging 
activities. Everyone especially 
loved the pizza and pajama 
party held this year, connplete 
with puppet shows, arts and 
crafts, and gannes. 




URBAN CHILDREN'S MINISTRY 71 









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The 2008-2009 school year was an important year not only at Olivet but also for our nation; it was another election year. The elections | 
brought out many different opinions and thoughts on different issues affecting citizens in the United States and around the globe. 

The two candidates for the 2008 elections were very different, yet each had a portion of the Olivet student body standing behind 
them. 

John McCain and vice presidential choice Sarah Palin ran for the Republican Party. Their campaign slogan read,"Country First."McCain 
had served in the Vietnam War and was held as a prisoner of war for five-and-a-half years. Much of his campaign centered on his history of 
service to the United States. 

BarackObama, along with vice president Joe Biden, ran for the Democratic Party. Their campaign slogan was,"Change."Obama's cam- 
paign then focused around this word, and he promised in many ways that he would change the future of America if elected. Barack Obama | 
won the election and was sworn in as the 44th president on January 20, 2009. 

Each of these candidates had their own opinions about the many different issues involved in the campaign, and the students atj 
Olivet were more than ready to participate in these historic events. Regardless of whom the students supported, the presidential and vice 
presidential debates were watched all over campus and discussed for days after. Many students registered to vote months before coming to 
school to be sure that their absentee ballots would arrive in time. All day students and professors alike would ask ,"Have you voted yet?"The 
energy could be felt in the area as students practiced their right to vote. 

Many students also gave uptime to help this election take place. On November 4 groups of students could be found all around the 
Kankakee area giving of their time to help at the polls. One of these students, Emilie Padgett, gave her opinion of election day and her involve- 
ment at the polls. 

Padgett, a junior physical education major, spent the day working the polls. She admitted that she first signed up to work the polls be- 
cause it meant some extra cash, but she soon realized it was about much more than that. She realized how important this election would be 
because no matter what candidate won, it would make history because we would either have a woman vice president or an African-American 
president. She said it was very exciting to see the student body get involved and cast their vote for the first time. Many of the students seemed 
nervous and unsure of what to do, but she said it was fun to help them. 

It was Emilie's first time to vote as well, and it was very exciting for her because she felt like her voice was making a difference. She 
knew that whoever won would have to make serious decisions, such as what to do about the war in Iraq, and she wanted to have a part in 
deciding who would get to make those decisions. 

Emilie encouraged other students to get involved in politics and the upcoming elections. She said it is important because not only 
will these leaders affect our generation, but our children and grandchildren. The leaders of our country will also have an impact on our future,! 
education and jobs. She said this election was important to her because she realized it could affect her career as an educator. j 

Emilie said that working the polls was a wonderful experience. It opened her eyes to the impact that politics have, and the impact 
that she can have. She warned future poll workers to get some sleep because she ran on coffee and got a little silly by the end of the day. 

The year 2008 was a defining year in our country's history. It was important for students such as Emilie to get involved in the elections 
because each voice counts and makes a difference for our future. 



72 FEATURE STORY: DEMOCRACY IN ACTION 



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FEATURE STORY: DEMOCRACY IN ACTION 73 



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On August 1, 2008, the community lost a lifelong member and dedicat(|d 
administrator, Dr. Willis Edward Snowbarger. Snowbarger worked at Olivet for 7 
years and was an administrator for 28. He was promoted to academic dean in 1 9?. 
Throughout his time here, he helped design academic buildings, helped the schol 
earn North Central Association national accreditations, contributed to intercollegide 
athletics becoming a part of the campus, and offered guidance to the developmeit 
of two other Nazarene schools. Snowbarger helped design Larsen Fine Arts Centr, 
Reed Hall of Science and Wisner Hall for Nursing Education, according to Gord(n 
Wickersham, historian for Olivet. In his honor, Snowbarger Athletic Park was nam<|d 
after him. i. 



7 6 FEATURE STORY: SNOWBARGER 



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FEATURE STORY : SNOWBARGER 7 7 



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The 2008-2009 administration team welcomed Dr. 
Gregg Chenoweth as the vice president for academic 
affairs to help tackle issues and look into the future. 
The rest of team includes Dr. John Bowling as the un 
versity president, Mr. Brian Allen as the vice president 
for institutional advancement, Mr. Doug Perry as vice 
president for finance, and Rev. Woody Webb as vice 
president for student development. 

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SfiRrT*>L UM>eR P6 vieLL AS Nft 0J-6TAV\«V>6 h^- 
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1. (left to. right, back 
to front) Brian Allen, 
Walter "Woody" Webb, 
Doug Perry, John Bowl- 
ing and Gregg Chennoweth 
happily pose for their 
group photo . 2 . The A- 
Team poses outside of 
the Burke Administration 
building for a photo. 



78 



A-TEAM 





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John C. Bowling - University 


Steve Greene 


Ron Scarlett 


President 


Fred Hall 


Duane Schmidt 


Ted R. Lee -Chairman 


Charles H. Hayes 


Karen Scott 


Stephen T. Anthony - Vice 


Edward Heck 


John Seaman 


Chairman 


Crawford M. Howe 


Cheryl Seymour 


Mark L Hostetler - Secretary 


Douglas Jones 


John Sherwood 


J. David Alderson 


Lawrence Lacher 


William Shotts 


John Alexander 


Clayton Lewis 


MarkShuff 


Richard Barriger 


Michael Lingle 


Timothy Smith 


Mark Bennett 


Jack McCormick 


Gene Snowden 


D. Randy Berkner 


Cyndi McDonald 


Jim Spruce 


Ronald Blake 


Stu Meissner, Jr. 


Charles Sunberg 


Steven T.Boha II 


Garrett Mills 


Brian Wilson 


David Brantley 


Garry Pate 


Lee Woolery 


'A/ayne Brown 


Keith Peachey 


Ex-Officio Members 


Cary Cable 


Mark Pennington 


(non-voting) 


Arlene Chenoweth 


MarkQuanstrom 


Brian Allen 


John Connett 


Jill Rice 


Gregg Chenoweth 


-ance Delbridge 


Myra Richardson 


Douglas Perry 


dodger DeVore 


Judi Roarick 


Walter Webb 


<evin Dunlop 


David G. Roland 




^hil Edwards 








ff 



e ONU Board of Trustees' goal is to set 
ar~id maintain vision, missions and values 
for Olivet. They are made up of men and 
women who care an incredible amount 
"or the University. Not only do they keep 
a watchful eye on Olivet's issues, but they 
also look to see what will be best for Ol- 
ivet's future. 






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Jaime Acosta 

Virginia Alcorn 

Jeremy Alderson 

Michelle Allen 

Robert Allen 

Hampton Anderson 



Mary Anderson 

Rena Anderson 

Ronny Anderson 

Douglas Armstrong 

Scott Armstrong 

Ann Atkinson 



David Atkinson 

Jason Aukerman 

Karen Ball 

Jonathan Bartling 

David Becker 

Rebecca Belcher-Rankin 



Jeffery Bell 
Sharon Bellomy 

Nancy Benoit 
Michael Benson 

Craig Bishop 
Leon Blanchette 



Ray Bower 

Darcel Brady 

Kevin Brewer 

Kelly Brown 

Stephen Brown 

Karla Byrne 



FACULTY & STAFF 





Matthew Calhoun 
Wilfredo Canales 
Charles Carrigan 
Stephen Case 
Sarah Chappell 
Gregg Chenoweth 



Alisha Clark 
Richard Colling 
Gwen Cullins 
Barbara Daake 
Martha Dalton 
William Dean 



Mary Dillinger 
Paul Dillinger 
Susan Esther Draine 
Matthew Dwyer 
Elaine Eilders 
Eddie Ellis 



Dan Ferris 
Derek Ferris 
Leo Finkenbinder 
Carl Fletcher 
Roxanne Forgrave 
Patricia Forquer 



Juliene Forrestal 
Mark Frisius 
Andrew Gibbs 
Heather Gibbs 
Barbara Giguere 
Dwight Ginn 



David Giove 
Marianne Glenn 



FACULTY & STAFF 81 



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Mark Goldfain 
Dale Goodman 

Ralph Goodwin 

Elizabeth Gray 

Daniel Green 

Lorna Guimond 



Jana E. Hacker 

Willa Harper |; / 

Marc Harris 

Andrew Hasik 

Mary Haskins 

Dale Hathaway 



Heather Hathaway 

Craighton Hippenhammer 

Janice Hockensmith 

Mark Holcomb 

BCristy Ingram 

Lauren Jackson 



David Johnson 

Patricia Kershaw 

Justin Knight 

Thomas Knowles 

Karen Knudson 

Scott Knudson 



Paul Koch 

Rodney Korthals 

Carol Lang 

Andrea Lawrence 

Barry Lee 

Molly Lee 



Nancy Leth 
Gregory Long 



FACULTY & STAFF 





Catherine Lundmark 
Joshua Lundmark 
Casey Manes 
Jean Martin 
Stan Martin 
Jay Martinson 



Shirleen Mas 
Daniel McDonald 
Amber McKean 
Neal McMuUian 
Pamali Meadows 
Annette Meents 



Timothy Mercer 
Dwayne Mills 
Jean Milton 
John Mongerson 
Franklin Moore 
Matthew Moore 



Susan Moore 
Kathleen Morgan 
Kathleen Moriarty 
Mark Mountain 
Connie Murphy 
Larry Murphy 



Holly Nelson 
Timothy Nelson 
Faith Newman 
Ivor Newsham 
Emily Normand 
Melissa Nymeyer 



Beth Olney 
Kent Olney 



FACULTY & STAFF 83 



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Dale Oswalt 

Debra Owen 

Frances Penrod 

Charles Perabeau 

David Pickering 

Agnes Posthumus 



Michael Pyle 

Mark Quanstrom 

Roy Quanstrom 

Linda Rantz 

Max Reams 

Donald Reddick 



Mary Reed 

Arlene Reel 

Nathaniel Reiss 

Aaron Rice 
Jeffrey Rice 

Sheila Rice 



Diane Richardson 

Brian Robbins 

Anna Robins 

Yvette Rose 

Gina Rupert 

Joseph Schroeder 



Zoe Seed 

Richard Shelton 

Priscilla Skalac 

Connie Skinner 

Megan Skinner 

Dale Smith 



Matthew Smith 
Scott Smith 




FACULTY & STAFF 




Ryan Spittal 
Sara Spruce 
Deborah Stafford 
Amy Stanford 
Carol Stevenson 
Ghedam Sultan 



Darlene Swanson 
Bradley Thomas 
Houston Thompson 
Jessica Thompson 
Martha Thompson 
Timothy Thompson 



Richard Tran 
Susan Turner 
H. Tuttle 
Rosalie Tuttle 
Andrew Twibell 
James Upchurch 



Larry Vail 
David Van Heemst 
David Vance 
Beth Veit 
Kristian Veit 
Carol Watson 



Walter Webb 
Kelly Wellenreiter 
Pamela Whalen 
Sue Williams 
Raymond Wissbroecker 
Freda Wolfe 



Brian Woodworth 
Karen Wright 
Beatriz Ydrovo 



# 



FACULTY & STAFF 85 




Three collapsed lungs. Five doctors. Six operations. 28 X-Rays. Four nnedi- \ 
cations. 21 days in the hospital. Lived to tell his story. 

Brandon Baumann was on his way to a great senior year. He had a light 
class load during the fall sennester with his senior piano recital to rehearse 
for and student teaching to prepare for. Everything took a turn for the worst, 
though, when he was rushed to Provena St. Mary's Hospital in Kankakee on 
August 29, 2008. 

A general practitioner from the hospital had discovered that his left lung was 
60 percent collapsed. 

"I was out of breath all the time. It was very difficult to play the flute, [and] 
it was impossible to run [because] it caused immediate pain and I could not \ 
breathe/' Brandon explains. ' ^'""'"''^' 

His first surgery was going to be the next morning to insert a tube that would release the trapped ir 
inside his chest. "When a lung collapses,"he explains, "air escapes out of the lung from a perforation. Once ^e 
air is outside the lung, the lung cannot expand into space [again]." I 

That night, Brandon was awakened by God. He felt a sudden urge to pray and was eventually led to Isajh 
40. "God was speaking to me and telling me that if I simply placed my trust in Him that everything was (p- 
ing to be OK — that someday I would be able to run again, and that someday God was going to renew iiy 
strength. So from that point, I was not afraid," he says. 

Even though the surgery went well, Brandon's lung did not stop leaking. Another doctor, "Dr. Lung/'t d 
Brandon that he would need a pleurodesis done. That is, the lining of the lung was stripped to create inflai- 
mation in Brandon's lungs. This, in turn, would create scar tissue. 

After being back at school for roughly a month, Brandon experienced another collapse in his left lung. T is 
time the fix was relatively simple. The tube was put in place again, and he was free to go back to school v^ 
it in. He had it removed a week later when the lung had stopped leaking. That was not the end of it, thou 

"Just three days after the tube was removed on the left side, my right lung collapsed," he says 

This was the third and final time he went to the hospital. This time, Brandon and the doctors decided to 
the pleurodesis on his right side as well. He had two blebs, air pockets on the lungs, removed, thus preve 
ing another collapse. 

The doctors finally diagnosed Brandon with spontaneous pneumothorax. 

"Typically all that is needed to fix a spontaneous pneumothorax is inserting a chest tube for two or th?ei 
days. Once you have had one spontaneous pneumothorax your chance of having another one in the nxt 
five years is pretty high," he says. 

So after all of that, three collapsed lungs, five doctors, six operations, 28 X-Rays, four different med 
tions and 21 total days in the hospital, Brandon Baumann was lucky to still be alive. His life is a true testim(hy 
to the work and power of God. 



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SENIOR FEATURE STORY 87 



se\rtfoRS 




Bonnie Acker 



8 8 SENIORS 



Jeffrey Alexander 



Juan Alfaro 



Amy Alford 



Kyle Allen 




Jason Anderson 





Gina Barber 



Kenneth Baumann 







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Arissa Beck 



April Becker 



Rachel Bedell 



Annette Beechamp 



Ashley Beever 




Kimberly Behnmg 



Audra Bell 



Austin Bender 



Michael Benson 



Raina Bensyl 



W\ 





50-6lWrTrer> ^Iq-^q 



PJ^TO TAKeW -W: ARiSS^ "teCK 



g 



f 1. Dana Mulder shows her 
'" tough side during a game 
of powder puff football. 
2. Jeremy Lochner is giv- 
ing it his all. 3. Jamie 
Hsu is Rufio at the Candy 
Costume Fest. 4. Ian Cole 
catches up on some read- 
ing while floating in the 
Dead Sea during his se- 
mester abroad in Egypt. 



SENIORS 89 




Daniel Berquist 



Stephen Berry 



Justin Beuthin 



Rebecca Blomquist 




Cortney Bluege 

1. Twins Lauren 
Green and Hillary 
Cole are happy to 
seniors together. 
Katie Kirsch shows 
off her muscles 
while helping duri 
move-in week. 



Jaclyn Bollinger 



Kaylee Bontrager 



Andrea Bowne 



Lindsey Bright 




90 SENIORS^ V "^ vV..^ 



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Lashawnda Bums 




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Tony Calero 



Stephen Cargile 



. Charlie Brown and 
-3 crew showed up 
: the Candy Costume 
=st this year. 2. 
rn Jackson performs 
:me of his music at 
;iner'3= Bakery. 




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Joshua Carman 



Jami Carpenter 



Karen Carrigan 



Emily Bums 




Lauren Buys 




Jennifer Carlson 




Luis Carrizales 




Melanie Carroll 



Catnese Carson 



Ashley Catapano Christy Claypool 



Amanda Closser 
SENIORS 91 



1. Ollies Fol- 
lies seniors are 
having a good 
time. 2. Stepha- 
nie Penev encour 
ages the seniors 
to give peace a 
chance . 




Justin Darden 



92 SENIORS 



Rachel Dawson 



Ashley Dearmond 



Kristina Delost 



Christopher Demerell 



Sandra Demzik 



Kyle Denault 



Jason Dennis 



Michael Denny 



Hope Denton 




Tricia Deter 




Jami Dewey 



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Courtney Eanes 




Cindy Ellis 




Bethany English 



Sarah Doty 



Jessica Dressier 




Jenna Edgecomb 



Miriam Edwards 



1. Nick McDonald takes his 
reading outdoors to the quad 
on a beautiful fall day. 



^ ^ 



Jamie Dumelle 





^..-^W^^^^^"^"^ 



SENIORS 93 




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Kristen Erdahl 



Adriana Espinoza 



Sarah Evenson 



Deborah Faircloth 



Ashley Farris 




Dana Ferguson 



Melissa Fett 



Stephanie Fleschner 



Caleb Floyd 



Joel Floyd 




1. Elen Sultan spends time 
in the libary working on her 
homework with a friend. 2. 
April Becker makes beautiful 
music . 



PtoTo T^Kew -91: "^ReviT m^lovsi 



94 



SENIORS 



1. Annie Shaughnessy 
enjoys the block 
party. 2. Kristi Lam 
reads a good book 
while sitting in the 
quad. 




'"' Brittany Frost Rory Fry 



Alyssa Gee 



Andrea Gibson 



Claire Freiburg 




Liliana Gonzalez 



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Ben Hall 
SENIORS 95 




Stephen Hamilton 



Victoria Harden 



Amanda Harrelson 



Ali Heinold 



Michael Heinold 




Shaun Heitzman 



Sarah Helmker 



Sarah Henning 



Hayley Henry 




Elizabeth Hernandez 

1. Emily Poling | 
gives her all durJg 
a game at the Blocj 
Party. 2. Jarrett | 
Roloff is a ball o 
fun at the Candy 
~~-Sas.tume Fest. 



Todd Hespell 



James High 



Sarah Hileman 




Ernilee Hill 



Joshua Hjort 




Kellie Hodge 

9 6 SENIORS 



Loren Hoekstra 




■^ToWev>^-.^W55^^«^^ 







Stacey Hoekstra 



Teresa Hoffmeyer 



Meredith Hoppe 



Sarah Horvath 




Zachary Hosick 



Lindsay Houseman 



Shang Hsu 



Rebecca Hughes 



Brittany Hulse 




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Maurice Hutton Jr. 



Jamie Jacobs 




Marissa Jacobs 

1. Brian Welter is 
the King of Spamalot 
during Broadway 
Revue . 2 . Jonathan 
Schultz takes a trip 
down the slide at 
the Block Party. 



Emily Jacobson 



Emily James 






90RV<*^ 






Jared Jaymes 



Kelli Jensen 




Awna Johnson 



Cara Johnson 
SENIORS 97 




51 f^^^ 




Dennis Johnson 



Angelina Jones 



Jessica Jones 



Kelsi Jones 



Joy Jupp 




1. The seniors show 
support for their 
fellow classmates 
during the wacky 
games of Ollies Fol- 
lis. 



9U>-fo WftV\ ^^ 



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98 SENIORS 










Gregg Kraly . 



" '^ • Sarah Kunkes 



Anthony Kupchek 



Betsy Kurtz 



1. Emily Jacobson sings 
during her performance in 
Messiah. 2. Kenneth Dela- 
ney entertains through 
song during the Ollies 
Follies Variety Show. k 



""^^•^^^^-JS? 



AWTitoviv 



Allison Lash 



Kayla Kusterman 




Elizabeth Leigh 

SENIORS 99 




Elliot Maloney 



100 SENIORS 




Stephanie Meid 
SENIORS 101 




Karin Mick 



^; 



l.Audra Werntz 
and Emily Poling 
smile big dur- 
ing RA training. 
2. Hank Crofford 
sees how he mea- 
sures up. 



Poppy Miller 



Ryan Miller 



Amy Millsap 





(0-3 



lO-i 



Leah Mingus 



102 SENIORS 




i 




Dana Mulder 



Nandi Munson 



Michelle Nancarrow 



Douglas Nielsen 



Jessica Nielsen 





Luke Nixon 



Uyapo Nleya 




Monica Nontell 



Elena Norman 



Aaron Nush 



,e[ Elizabeth O'neal 



1 . Sarah Henning plays 
her character well in 
Anatomy of Grey. 2. Mo 
Hutton and Terrell Boyd 
enjoy their final 01- 
lies Follies Variety 
Show. 




SENIORS 103 




.'.I'll 
Sarah Palm 



1. Seniors get pumped 
at Ollie Follies. 
2. Kelsi Jones uses 
the weather as an ex- 
cuse to do homework 
outside . 




Kyle Peacock 



Stephanie Penev 




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^"■•^^ec^ 



Allison Peck 





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Michael Perez 



Ryan Person 




Kylee Powers 
104 SENIORS 




SENIORS 105 



.Ml 



1. Megan McKinley 
won the costume 
contest! 2. Dan- 
iel Stiff, Kevin 
Wakefield, Brandon 
Upchurch and Matt 
Lyle wear their 
goggles proudly. 




Brett Sayre 
106 SENIORS 




Megan Schwind 



Alyse Scott 



Rebekah Scott Sabrina Seed Austin Senior 




Joshua Severs 



Brodie Sharp 



Ann Shaughnessy 



Jessica Shumaker 



I 




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1. Kim Behning and 
Katie Kirsch enjoy a 
night of bowling with 
the senior class coun- 
cil. 2. Liz Brown gets 
her message out dur- 
ing the Ollies Follies 
Variety Show. 



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Dawn Sickles 




Michelle Sims 



Derek Sinko 




Kasey Six 




SENIORS 107 




Brooklin Soulia 
108 SENIORS 



Sarah Stevenson 



Caleb Stewart 



Daniel Stiff 



Daniel Stombaugh 



Rachel Straub 



1. Elena Norman 
gets carried away 
by Alissa Woods 
during a game at 
the spiritual life 
retreat. 2. The 
seniors wave their 
flag high. 




SENIORS 109 




Megan Taylor 



Kristin Tiarks 



Danielle Urfer 
110 SENIORS 



Amanda Ter Beest 




Jason Tezawa 



1. Melanie Carroll 

and Nick McDonald 

get down to some 

karaoke. 2. Liliana 

Gonzalez and Lindsay 

Bright pose with the 

Tigers' mascott. 



Joel Thomas 



Elizabeth Thompson 



Jon Troglio 




P^ -ftKfiw -w: rm STemv\sm 



Brittany Vantrease 



Craig Vantrease 



Julia Vargo 



Jenny Vaughn 




SENIORS 111 



1. Hillary Cole 
dolls up for Home- 
coming Coronation. 
2. Rachel Straub 
poses in a leaf hut. 




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Laura Wilkens 



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Amber Willard 




Ashley Woodbum 



It'll- jT, (l J 

Courtney Wooding 



Alissa Woods 



John Wright 



Kristen Wright 




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Sarah Wright 
112 SENIORS 



Janet Wynstra 



Dana Yost 



Jennifer Zelhart 




1. students recognized by Who's 
Who smile for the camera. 2. The 
group gets goofy for a group 
photo. 3. Danny Quanstrom, Whit- 
ney Allison and Kristi Lam enjoy 
being together. 



The 2008-2009 edition of Who's 
Who Among Students in Ameri- 
can Universities and Colleges 
included 37 Olivetians. For more 
than 60 years, Who's Who has 
honored students for their high 
achievements on campus. Who's 
Who students are nominated by 
faculty and students and recog- 
nized for their academic achieve- 
ment, extracurricular activities 
and leadership abilities. 



Whitney Allison 
Kenneth Brandon Ba 
Rachel Bedell 
Austin Bender 
Stephen Berry 
Kaylee Bontrager 
Tony Calero 
Hillary Cole 
Ian Cole 

Kenneth Delaney 
Adriana Espinoza 
Lauren Green 
Amanda Harrelson 
Meredith Hoppe 
Keisi Jones 



umann 

Kristin Lam 
Meagan Lamping 
Dan Leimann 
Matthew Lyie 
Sondra Lynn 
Laura Maiolo 
Bryan Marquis 
Wade McCann 
Janina Mengarelli 
Dana Mulder 
Kyle Peacock 
Daniel Quanstrom 
Andrew Rice 
Alex Rodriguez 
Dan Rodriguez 
Jarret Roloff 
Megan Schwind 
Brooklin Soulia 
Elen Sultan 
Christa Sunberg 
Audra Werntz 
Dana Yost 



^lOTO lhK&f\ VI: i^CK fRVe 



I 



WHO'S WHO 



iii' 



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God can use many avenues to advance us toward His will for our lives. For senior Tony Gongaware, a rare nnedical 
condition was the avenue God chose. 

From early on, Gongaware was conditioned for athletic success:"IVly first word was ball," he says. "Athletics were what 
I lived for." 

His athletic abilities had gained him the recognition and special privileges often afforded to small-town sports he- 
roes. In his hometown of Batavia, III., he was untouchable, and he was well aware of the source of his status. 

"I judged my success by how I played," he remembers. 

But in his sophomore year of high school, halfway through the basketball season, he was stripped of his standard of 
self-measurement. One morning he woke up unable to move, and was hospitalized soon 
after. He remained in the hospital overnight, and then he was sent home, where he was 
bedridden and received treatment from nurses. He lost more than 30 pounds in 1 days. 
After several tests, doctors determined that he was suffering a bacterial infection in his lower 
back, of which there have been fewer than 20 cases reported in young people. 

"I started questioning a lot of things," Tony says. "I felt like there was nothing to live 
for." 

Since he wasn't raised in the church, he previously had no reason to search for mean- 
ing beyond the games he played. 

Before his hospitalization, by what he now recognizes as divine appointment, Tony 
and his sister attended a church service. They sat in the back to avoid being noticed, and left 
out the back door at the end of the service. As they were exiting, they saw a man running 
toward them. It was the church's youth pastor, Kevin White, and he was running just to greet 
them before they left. 

Lying in a hospital bed, Tony remembered this scene. The man who had gone to 
such great lengths just to shake his hand was now by his side, supporting him as he prepared 
for a treatment procedure. He saw in White a level of commitment to the Gospel that was 
even greater than his own commitment to athletics. This got him thinking seriously about 
God. 

"I thought'Well, if this God is real, and if He is in control of everything, I might want to 
be on His side.'" 

This thought would mark the beginning of his relationship with God, and a change in 
the direction of his life. He would put his all into living for Christ. 

After a few months, loadsof antibiotics, and a coupleof hospital visits,Tony recovered 
— and he remains healthy today. 

Soon after his recovery, at the age of 1 7, Tony felt the call to ministry. He's following 
that calling, majoring in Christian education. He hopes to one day organize a missions pro- 
gram for professional athletes to use their success as a tool for ministry in their hometowns. 
He is currently a leader in the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. 



114 JUNIOR FEATURE STORY 





JUNIOR FEATURE STORY, 



LL 



dOV^foRS 




^i- 



John Adams 

Daniel Allen 

Samantha Allen 

Eliza Aluculesei 

Renee Ames 

Linda Anders 



Natalee Anderson 
Christie Andrews 
Brent Anthony 
Bradley Arthur 
Bethany Bacon 
Brittany Bailey 



Molly Bailey 

Lyssa Baker 

Tyler Baldwin 

Kaitlin Barker 

Morgan Barnell 

Paul Bayer 



William Beaumont 

Christyn Bell 

Mark Bell 

Cole Berkley 

Elizabeth Bernhardt 

Stephanie Bertolozzi 



Dolphy Biswas 

Deanna Blacklock 

Casey Bloom 

Alexa Bocanegra 

Carrie Booth 

Lindsey Borgman 



1. JD Cisneros gives a thumbs 

up to show his excitement as he 

watches the Ollies Follies events. 




■^rrw^e^l^vNsev. 



116 



JUNIORS 





Jennifer Bouquet 
Crystal Brais 
Courtney Bronson 
Chelsea Brown 
Maureen Brown 
Judy Buchanan 



Matthew Buller 
Kevin Burke 
Rachel Burke 
Jonathan Burkey 
Heather Burns 
Leah Calco 



Elizabeth Campbell 
Brittany Carpenter 
Lacey Carter 
Amy Catlett 
David Caudle 
Matthew Cawvey 



Crystal Cheever 
Jason Chew 
Bethany Christiansen 
Dominic Clark 
Sarah Clark 
Patrick Cole 



I 



1. Jody Young canies his skate- 
board on his way into lunch at 
Ludwig. 




/ 



^.•• 






JUNIORS 117 



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„,«(K«-/-^ ■ -wv# 




1 . Kyan Glenn and Na 
talee Anderson defend 
the title of Ollies 
Follies ultimate fris- 
bee champions. 



Nicola Craig 

Nolan Cram 

Kendall Cramer 

Caitlin Crandall 

Joshua Crawford 

Kent Davenport 



Josh DeBoei 

Mary DeGn)ot 

Laura DeMeicI! 

Allysa De Young 

Jenna Dickc> 

Amber Doan 



Kelsey Dopson 

Seth Doran 

Tyler Dossett 

Chelsey Downs 

Nora Duffy 

Shellise Durante 



Courtney Eanes 

Lauren Edwards 

Christine Ellis 

Lauren Erdahl 

Tiffany Fatchahne 

Aaron Feigen 



118 JUNIORS 





Michael Flowers 
Rachel Foley 
Kelly Foster 
Peter Foster 
Trevin Frame 
Nathaniel Frantz 



Nathan Frazer 
Chelsea Freed 
Zachary Frye 
Kailey Geiselman 
Meghann Giarraputo 
Jeremy Gibson 



Sarah Giove 
Allison Goedhart 
Travis Greene 
Katie Gremar 
Elizabeth Groover 
Erica Grossman 



James Guffey 
Stephanie Gunnerson 
Bethany Hagenberg 
Scott Hale 
Alaina Hamlin 



J 



JUNIORS 119 



^1 



\ \ 



w 



Mallori Hartke 

Paul Hayes 

Elizabeth Hiatt 

Tyler Hoaglun 

Sarah Hobbs 

Timothy Hoekstra 



Kelly Holcomb 

Tyler Hull 

Andrea Humrichouser 

Katrina Hurt 

Jacob Jackson 

Jennifer Jackson 



Camilyn Jahn 
Ashley James 

Danielle Johnston 

Julia Johnston 

Isabella Kaburu 

Johanna Kearney 



John Keating 

Elizabeth Keck 

Melody Kennell 

Hannah Keys 

Stephanie Kidle 

Michael Kidwell 



Taylor Kiger 

Allen Kilburn 

Jenna Kirts 

McCall Kitchel 

Jonathan Knol 

Jessica Kroymann 





Kathleen Kujawa 

Christian Lacher 

Nathan Lalone 

Renee Lambert 

Jeffrey Lamping 



(( 



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1. BCristen Wilson and Leah 
Calco share a good laugh. 2. 
Aaron Feigen, Brad Moore, 
Zach Alexander, Charlie 
Leimann and Matt Phillips 
energetically strike a pose at 
the Block Party. 



Sarah O'Neal 

Megan Ochs 

Misti Ohrt 

Daniel Oliver 

Sara Oliver 

Luke Olney 



Brady Oring 

Lauren Penrod 

Lisa Pesavento 

Brittany Petree 

Rachel Phelps 

Matthew Phillips 



Jason Piper 

Allen Posey 

Tori Prentice 

John Radzimanowski 

Neil Rago 

Rachael Ramer 



Brandon Rattin 

Elyse Rawley 

Angela Reedy 

Alyssa Reeves 

Rebekah Regenfuss 

Lauren Reimers 



li 
II 



122 JUNIORS 



It 



Dustin Rennewanz 
Sandra Ritter 
Marissa Robbins 
Kelsey Robinson 
Tanya Robinson 
Kathleen Rojek 



Adrienne Root 
Kendra Rose 
Whitney Rothney 
Lorel Rutherford 
Sarah Rutledge 
Daniel Ryan 




1. Kyle Saffell reads through a 
list of students during a drill for 
ROTC. 2. Josh Woods busts 
out a rhyme at the Ollies Fol- 
lies talent show. 3. Matt Phillips 
and Marcia Strong pause to chat 
between classes. 



PiDTD TAKem T/: "^RewT mru>v\i 



. •• 



^ 



JUNIORS 123 



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Zachary Shore 

Hilary Short 

John Short 

Thiphaphone Sivilay 

Anna Smit 

Dayna Sommers 



Stephanie Steele 

Roxanne Stevens 

Tara Stevens 

Jennifer Stob 

Sean Streff 

Marcia Strong 



Whitney Tatman 
Debra Taylor 

Reagan Taylor 
Heather Terhorst 
Abby Thompson 

Jordan Thorse 



Joshua Tijerina 

Caitlin Todd 

Jeremiah Toole 

Tarshawa Townsend 

Paul Trotter 

Elise Tyma 



Katherine Ufkin 

Christiana Underdown 

Amanda linger 

Matthew Upshaw 

Christa Van Bruggen 

Katy Van Donselaar 





?toTo UKfiw VI: Tiw sxe^ims&t\ 



124 JUNIORS 










1^ 



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1. David Shay plays his instij 

ment with confidence at Pari 

with Jesus. 2. Kate Rojek enlys 

i, , 
some studying time on a be;i ili 

sunny day. 





Rebecca Vander Naald 
Kami Vander Velde 
Emily Vaught 
Katie Vietti 
Benjamin Voss 
Elizabeth Voss 



Daniel Walker 
Sara Wantz 
Phillip Warren 
Julie Watson 
Kj-isten Watson 
Sarah Webb 



Brittanie Weimer 
Luke Wellman 
Timothy Weston 
Bryan Whalen 
Houston Wheeler 
Anastasia White 



Kasie White 
Paul White 
Constance Whiteside 
Jessica Whitt 
Keitha Wickey 
Ashley Williams 



Christen Wilson 
Felicia Wimberly 
Chelsea Winn 
Joshua Woods 
Sarah Yanchick 
Lindsay Zavitz 




/ 



L Jacob Jackson works in the editing lab on a video 
project. 2. Julia Johnston spends some time with 
friends in the library. 



-^•^T^VIN 



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/^-JUNIORS 125 




so'^tv^rrret? pk)To 



^v\v\\t voea^eR 




Sophomore Annie Weaver tells the story of how she came from Peoria, III., to be a student at Olivet Nazarene Univer 
sity. As Annie began searching for schools, she was not exactly sure what she was looking for, but decided to apply to quite 
few schools to see what her options were. After much persuading from a family friend, she eventually filled out an applicatiorl 
to Olivet. Annie's guidance counselor sent out her transcripts without Annie's knowledge, and so she was surprised when he 
acceptance letter from Olivet arrived. Annie was still uncertain as to what college she would attend, but after a visit to Olive 
she knew in her heart that this was right. Before visiting any schools Annie had made a list of three qualifications that a schoc 
needed to have for her to be happy there. She wanted to have Christian professors, be close to home, and be able to easil; 
make friends with the girls. After her campus tour she realized that all three qualifications were met beyond her expectations 
and she knew this was the school God had for her. 

Though Annie knows that this is where she is supposed to be, she doesn't know for sure what she is going to d( 
once she has earned her degree. She started Olivet as a biology major, changed her major several times, and is now a sc 
ence education major. She hopes to travel overseas someday, but wants to have a trade to use to be able to help people. Sh 
thinks she may teach for a few years before being able to travel overseas to do missions work, but knows that in everything 
she wants to do God's will. I 

Since Annie has been at school she has had the opportunity to be involved in many different activities. She has played 
in intramural flag football and soccer and loved being part of the teams. She is also an RAon fourth floor Williams and love 
being able to get to know her girls and speak into their lives. Annie is also a co-leader of the campus prison ministry"Missiof 
Possible."There have been obstacles to overcome in order to be able to minister to the men and women in the Kankake( 
prison, but through it all, Annie has been able to trust God and has led her team in prayer and fasting for the inmates. Sh 
was very excited to see God work in the prisons in our area. i 

Annie has had many wonderful opportunities at school and feels like she has learned and grown in many ways. Sh 
has loved being here and has felt God gifting her in the area of encouragement. Annie has loved being able to speak into th( 
lives of her friends, teammates, and girls on her floor to share God's undying love and affection for them. Annie feels it is he 
life's calling to spread this news to those with whom she comes in contact and be a reminder that God is enthralled with tht 
beauty of His children. 

126 SOPHOMORE FEATURE STORY r 







'^ '^ 



'^ ^/ 






SOPHOMORE FEATUPf^ SjORY 127 



'^ '^ 



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$oPk)WvoRe$ 




Kathryn Addington 

Elizabeth Agan 

Harrison Agan 

Amanda Alberson 

Erin Alleman 



.1^ 



David Allen 

Samantha Allen 

Jaymie Anderson 

Elizabeth Arriaga 

Tiffany Atkinson 



Zachary Bailey 

Alice Banashak 

Bradlee Barnes 

Jason Batkiewicz 

Shannon Battershell 



Paul Beaty 




Kelly Beerbower 


m^^ 


Amy Bell 


^- Jf 


Kristen Bellomy 




Abigail Bentle 


, V'^j 





Natalie Berg 

Indalia Bemer 

Daniel Biddison 






N^ ^ 



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128 SOPHOMORES 




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Erin Blucker 
Kayla Boone 
Bradley Borgman 



Andrea Borton 
Jeremiah Bower 
Brandon Bowmar 



0i 


1 ,._.._,,. ;' 


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David Brause 
Josiah Bremer 
Nicole Brennan 
Dwight Brenner 
Matthew Brillion 



Jessica Brown 
Isaac Burch 
Blaire Burk 
Kayla Button 
Sara Byrne 



Tyler Campbell 
Casandra Carr 
Andrew Carretto 
Clinton Casey 
Caitlin Charles 



/ 



/. 



/ 



/ 



/ 



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SOPHOMORES 129 



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Lindsay Close 

Jessica Cohea 

Kendra Compton 

Paul Conzen 

Spencer Cook 



;^ 




1. Kevin Green tries to 
keep a steady hand in a 
game at the Block Party. 

2. Mark Lockwood spends 
some spare time working 
out between classes. 



P«>0+0 +aKeM ?V: ^Rfcvi+ 



anHoM-y 



130 SOPHOMORES 



H 





Joy Dierickx 
Cassie Dignan 
David Dignan 
James Dill 
Juliana Dirienzo 



1. Sophia Erzumiah 

works on a video 

project for a video 

production class. 



Caitlin Dodge 
Michael Dubois 
Amy Duerrwaechter 



Cameron Dunlop 
Jessica Dushane 
Stephanie Dusing 




^Re'o+ 9v>Hom 




Kathryn Eccles 
James Eckstein 
Jordan Eggleston 
Preston Eilders 
Melissa Eller 



Amy Enderli 
Erica Engelbrecht 
Keren Escoto 
Natasha Evins 
Kayla Fain 



Amy Farber 
Kyle Fellows 
Michael Fiorenzo 



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SOPHOMORES 131 



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John Fischer 

Lauren Fogwell 

Lauren Fortson 

Ehzabeth Foster 

Donald Fox 



Courtney Fuqua 

Brittany Gaffney 

Urbano Garcia 

Cassandra Garza 

Kesner Gee 



Alyssa Gibson 

Bryan Giesige 

Hilary Gilkey 

Brittnee Gilleylen 

Kelsee Gilleylen 



Jill Goerne 

Aaron Golden 

Kevin Greene 

Gladys Griffin 

Sebastian Grochowski 

Matthew Groves 



David Grundy 

Breann Guingrich 

Kathryn Gunderson 



\ 



\ ^^ 



\X V 






x^ V 



.\ 






X32 SOPHOMORES xN \^ ^ 




1. Jeixy Scheller 
feels a little over- 
vv'helmed during 
the festivities at the 
Block Party. 






>^ 



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\ 



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\ 



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Jorge Guzman 
Jasen Hackman 
Erica Hall 
James Hall 
Timothy Hall 



Philip Hamilton 
Jessica Harris 
Zachary Harvey 
Ryan Hayes 
Lance Hays 



,\ 



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A 






\ 



\ 






Jessica Heisey 
Caren Henderson 
Adam Hines 
Kyle Hodson 
Rachel Hoover 




\" \ 



\ 



> \ 



\ 






X 



Alison Hoskins 
Jadon Huddleston 
Annastacia Hughes 
Maria Huyser 
Emely Ibanez 
Young Im 



Kristy Iperlaan 
Callie Ivey 
Lisa Jackson 



PAo-f-o -(-aKev) 3V: aRissa ?ecK 



X\ 



X^ 



X 



^^^ 

V 



* SOPHOMORES 133 



1 1 

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Paul Jackson 

William Jackson 

Timothy Jefferies 

Whitney Jenkins 

Rebecca Jensen 



Nelly Jimenez 

Stephanie Jungles 

John Michael Jurica 

Zipporah Kapambwe 

Emily Karas 



Evan Karg 
Matthew Kee 

Amy Keen 

Kristen Kehl 

Rachel Keller 



Anna Kendrick 

Adam Kennell 

Jennifer Kershaw 

Kirstin Ketterman 

Amanda Kindle 



Laura Kirst 

Nicole Klein 

Tracy Koch 

Conine Koepsell 

Bethany Kolber 








SOPHOMORES 



P^o+o -f aKevi ^v: ?RfcM+ w+Uom 



1 . Laura Wayteck works on an 
art project during class time. 2. 
Jacob Barse kicks the ball while 
playing "human foosball" at the 
Block Party. 




:^ 




Stephanie Kolodzej 
Jessica Kortas 
Brian Kosek 
Kay la Koury 
Katherine Krause 



Nathan Krause 
Nicole Krawec 
Douglas Krop 
Katherine Kulchar 
Tricia Kundrat 



Stephanie Lalone 
Felicia Lamb 
Nikki Lamb 
Morgan Lathrop 
Chrissy Latunski 



Alex Laymon 
Angela Lee 
Rebecca Leibold 
Carlie Lengerich 
Mark Lockwood 




1 . K} ie Hodson and Sebas- 
tian Grochowski take a break 
from classes to play some 
video games. 2. Shannon Bat- 
tershell stays warm and cozy 
during some down time on 
the ASC retreat. 



/ 



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SOPHOA^OteS 135 

V 



y 



/ 



/ 






Michael Lyon 

Nobuhle Mamba 

Sara Marrs 

Andrea McCann 

Hilary McDaniel 

Katherine McDonald 



Kristen McDonald 

Emily McDowell 

Cody McGraw 

Anna Mcintosh 

Brittney McKenzie 

Lucas Mellinger 



Philip Merki 

Stella Meyers 

David Michaels 

Andrew Miller 

Joel Miller 

Nicole Miller 



Faith Mingus 

Francesca Miotti 

Rachel Monkemeyer 

Allyse Moore 

Kelsey Moreau 



Leeanna Neeley 
John Nolan 




1. Lindsay Close 
does her make up 
in preparation for 
her performance ir 
Broadway Revue. 



136 SOPHOMORES 




Charles Oehrake 
Carter Ollervidez 
Jennifer Ooten 
Alvaro Osorio 
Kelsey Outler 
Jacquelyn Owens 



Matthew Ozment 
Emihe Padgett 
Lindsey Pals 
Sarah Pare 
Jacob Peterson 
Elisabeth Peulausk 



Mary Phillips 
Timothy Phillips 
Farris Pierson 
Abby Pleasant 
Lauren Podguski 
Michael Polley 



Jeffrey Poucher 
Trisha Powell 
Amy Preston 
Crystal Pribyl 
Martin Pritchett 
John Quandt 



1. Brad Sytsma takes a shot at the 
block party. 2. Philip Merki holds the 
weight of a senior on his shoulders 
during a game of Buck Buck during 
Ollies Follies. 



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SOPHOMORES 137 



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John Rachan 

Joel Ramirez 

Remington Ramsey 

Blake Reddick 

Amanda Regert 

Jennifer Reierson 



Jacqueline Reinhardt 

Jill Retoff 

Nathan Rhule 

Sarah Riddle 



Kirsten Roberts 
Cara Robinson 
Kent Robinson 



Lauren Rothrock 

Jessica Ruddle 

Anna Sansom 



Olivia Santiago 

Rachel Sarver 

Stephanie Scannapieco 

Jerry Scheller 



Jessica Schewe 

Adam Schick 

Anne Schmelzer 

Tara Schmidt 



SOPHOMORES 







I.Paul Conzen focuses in on his 

next 

victim in dodgeball. 2. Tony 

Allen perforais as a pirate in 

Broadway Revue. 




PtoTO TAKfiW HV: C5?>Wie Wt^Wt 




Jyssica Schutz 
Rachel Scott 
Brittany Scruggs 
Leah Shankster 
Emily Shelton 
Justin Shonamon 




Samantha Smitte 
Kristine Sokarda 
Christopher Sorensen 



Christopher Sorensen 
Amanda Soukup 
Wesley Sprague 
Tayler St Aubin 



SOPHOMORES 139 



Rachel Stewart 

Ashlee Strickler 

Andrew Strombeck 

Kristi Sweeney 

Cameron Tharp 

Brittany Thomas 



Kaitlynn Thome 

Victoria Tillman 

Alyssa Tipping 

Nina Trisilla 

Alexis Troglio 

Michael Tuttle 



John Vance 

Amanda Vanderpool 

Sarah Vershowske 

Lauren Versweyveld 

Kristen Victorson 

Jayna Vroman 



Austin Wallace 

Victoria Wallin 

Ember Ward 



Paige Watson 

Laura Wayteck 

Anna Weaver 




140 SOPHOMORES 




ptoTo UKew VI: Tiw STepjAwsew 



1. Jase Hackman gets his per 
niance make-up applied befo 
the show. 2. Jaymie Andersoi 
focuses on her next move wh 
playing pool. 




Nathan Weeden 
Lauren Wegley 
Abigail Weisel 
Jennifer Wilkerson 
Joshua Wilkinson 
Angela Williams 



Devin Williams 
Jon Williams 
Michele Williams 
Bethani Wilson 
Catherine Wilson 
Steven Windberg 



Kelsey Wiseman 
Julie Wittmer 
Brittany Woods 
Rowan Woolsey 
Anson Workman 
Emily Wynstra 



Brittiny York 
Andrew Young 
Ashley Young 



Meredith Young 
Elizabeth Youngman 
Kylie Zolman 




1. Michael Whiteside thrills the 
crowd with his dance moves while 
. portraying Michael Jackson. 2. 
Wes Siscoe acts as Ferris Bueller in 
the Ollies Follies Talent Show. 



SOPHOMORES 141 



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s^wrtTffi' ?i^^'^ 



Beginning in junior high, I let lots of things start to rule over my life like drugs, alcohol and sex. I was diagnosed with 
depression my freshman year of high school, but did nothing to change it except self-destructive things, continuing 
what I was already doing. I also began cutting myself 

I continued this throughout high school and eventually it all came crashing down on me. My senior year of high 
school I became addicted to pain killers and was put into rehab twice -- to make me sober and give me other ways to 
cope with my depression. I was able to stop doing drugs and cutting; however, I still drank and did whatever I wanted 
to with guys. 

Then the day came that I found out I was pregnant. For four months I went back and forth wondering what I should 
do about it, and I had an abortion. I knew it was murder of an innocent baby, and immediately afterwards I felt extremely 
depressed. 

I dealt with it by drinking even more and soon became addicted to alcohol. Friends of mine pointed out to me what 
I was becoming, and eventually I realized I was at rock bottom and the only way to go was up from there. I realized I was 
an alcoholic and felt God tugging at my heart suddenly. 

For the first time in years I prayed an honest prayer to God and gave my life to Him. Since then, I made the decision 
to transfer to Olivet and I have had a complete turnaround from who I used to be. I am so excited about life and all that 
God has made me that all I want to do is proclaim the great things God has done for me. I feel completely blessed when 
I see how far I've come in all these years. I am very actively pro-life, anti-drug, and I have reinstated my purity with God. 
I just want to use my life to serve Him now and can't wait until I see His plan for my life. 



142 FRESHMAN FEATURE STORY 




FRESHMAN 



FEATURE STORY 143 



fRe$^wveY\ 



\ 

S 

w 

\\ 

\\ 

w 



Bethany Abbott 

Elisabeth Abfall 

Christian Adams 

Luis Aguilar 

Autumn Albring 

Kelsey Aldrich 



Heather Allison 

Ashley Alvarez 

Dustin Alvey 

David Anderson 

Jennifer Anderson 

Molly Anderson 



Ashlynn Angel 

Zachary Armstrong 

Colin Arnold 

John Arthur 

Seth Athialy 

Nicholas Atkins 



Kayte Bailey 
Erin Bales 

Noah Ballard 
Douglas Banker 

Zachary Bare 
Michael Barkley 



Douglas Barnes 

Elisabeth Barnes 

Jacob Barse 

Angela Bartholomew 

Austin Barwegen 

Nicholas Bays 






Caitlyn Beans 

Melissa Bednarek 

Natalie Begick 

Heidi Behal 

Elyse Bell 

Laura Benda 



144 FRP6HMEN 





Amanda Bender 
Micah Bennett 
Jordan Bergren 
Derek Berquist 
Natilee Bertolozzi 
Nicole Betts 



Al-Von Billips 
Amanda Birth 
Anna Bisliir 
Anna Blakemore 
Daniel Blanton 
Kelly Blucker 



Lauren Blunier 
Abby Boardman 
Ryan Boezeman 
Kathryn Booker 
Max Boots 
Mallory Boracci 



Melissa Brashaw 
Jacqueline Bratcher 
Matthew Breckenridge 
Lauren Briggs 
Julie Brooks 
Wade Bruce 



L Zachary Baker enjoys a conversa- 
tion in the quad between classes. 



Pk)TO 1>iKeV\ Tf: '^RevtT AWTtoW 



FRESHMEN 145 



u 



If 



u 



'( 



'( 



Kristin Burch 

Ashley Burgoyne 

Jessica Burneson 

Joshua Burns 

Tiara Burns 

Danielle Burris 



Ashley Burt 

Andrew Butler 

Valerie Byrd 

Terese Byrne 

Kendra Cable 

Kelley Cahan 



James Calabrese 

Blake Campbell 

Scott Cardimen 

Kyle Carlisle 

Jesse Carlson 

Caleb Carman 



Joel Carman 
Kenneth Can- 
Victoria Can- 
Joel Charboneau 
Caleb Chastain 
Emily Cheeseman 



Matthew Clark 

Dana Clausing 

Jeremiah Clennan 

Lauren Comfort 

Victoria Conley 

Tyler Conlin 



Amanda Cook 

Elizabeth Cook 

Jordan Cook 

Amy Cooke 

Lyndsay Coombs 

Amber Corbin 



Christian Cornish 

Karla Courtney 

Stephanie Cox 

Breanna Coy 

Alyssa Cramer 

Nathaniel Crandell 



X45 FRESHMEN 





PtoTo ThK&n "W: 3Mv«'e !?oRKee 



VW>fo 






@ 



1. Caitie Sweet has some fun 
while moving in to her new 
dorm. 2. Matt Marquez takes a 
break from classes and enjoys 
some football. 3. Jack Chris- 
tensen spends some of his free 
time with God by reading his 
Bible. 




Robert Croumlich 
Caitlyn Crum 
Sam Crupper 
April Culver 
Joshua Dampf 
Melanie Daniels 



Samantha Daniels 
Caleb Danner 
Kayla Davenport 
Chelsea Deaton 
Aubrey Dee 
Emily Del Soldato 



Tyler Delabarre 
Maria Deligiannides 
Renee Denning 
Matthew Dennis 
Kara Deyoung 
Sarah Di Monte 



Jesse Dillman 
Stefanie Diloreto 
Ethan Dixon 
Tyson Dodd 
Rae Marie Donaldson 
Abigail Doran 



Synthia Dorsey 
Abigail Doud 
Katlyn Downs 
Christine Doyle 
Landon Dubea 
Lynette Duncan 



FRESHMEN 147 









PtoTo wevi TO -^ReviT AMTtow 



sotivMTTe!> ptoTo 



Heather Eby 

Ashley Eckle 

Angela Edwards 

• Stephanie Eis 

Sarah Eissens 



Jordan Ekhoff 

Kaitlain Ekhoff 

Valerie Ellsworth 

Shane Emaus 

Rebekah Engbers 

Erica Ennis 



Sally Erickson 

Sophia Erzumiah 

Hannah Escalante 

Alejandro Escobar 

Corrie Everson 

Andrew Faber 



Amanda Fairchild 

Amanda Falligan 

Danielle Fase 

Almaz Fere 

Elizabeth Ferguson 

Jessica Ferreira 



1. Kristin Thompson engages in a conversation between classes in the 
quad. 2. Michael Bryant focuses on his next shot in an intense game 
of pool. 3. Maya Scott relaxes in a lazy river on the ASC retreat. 4. 
Stefanie Diloreto enjoys hanging her clothes as she finishes moving into 
her dorm. 



Alycia Dunham 

Brandon Dunham 

Sarah Durazo 



148 FRESHMEN 





v^ 



Felicia Fett v. 

St 
Jessica Fetzer 

Krista Fiala 

Janel Filbeck 

Lauren Finney 

Rachel Fisher 



Justin Flatter 
Laura Fleschner 
Maggie Fortson 
Brittnie Foster 
Whitney Foster 
Spencer Fox 



Nicholas Fraizer 
Kathryn Frias 
Antonio Punches 
Meghan Gage 
Francis Gantner 
Justin Garrelts 



Deeann Garvin 
Melissa Garwood 
Michael Garza 
Larry George 
Benjamin Gerboth 
Jordan Gerstenberger 



Reetu Ghotra 
Clarissa Gidcumb 
David Ginn 
Jonathan Glenn 
Molly Goldbach 
Emily Gorman 



Jessica Grashen 
Collin Graves 
Mark Green 
Tracey Griffin 
Mikayla Guy 
Rachel Haan 



V 



v^ 



V 



^ 




FRESHMEN 149 



Rose Hall 

Brittany Haller 

Jordan Hamann 

Christopher Hammett 

Shannon Hancock 

Desmond Handson 



Katherine Hannagan 

Jessica Harper 

Darius Harris 

Martha Harrouff 

Jacob Hasselbring 

Christopher Hatten 



Kate Hausken 

Emily Hay 

Rebekah Hazen 

Alexandria Heinold 

Derek Heinz 

Chad Hemphill 



Jerry Hendrickson 

Tessie Herbert 

Melinda Hess 

Michael Hickman 

Michael Hileman 

Austin Hill 



Jeffery Hinkley 

Gregory Hoekstra 

Kyle Hoffman 

David Hoffmann 

Keisha HoUis 

Deandre Holmes 



1. Candice Weisingen 
hangs out between classes 
in the quad. 2. The fresh- 
men struggle to pull their 
weight in the Ollies Follies 
tug-of-war competition. 




PtoTO TJiKClrt 'W: T)Hem MllOVli 






150 FRESHMEN 



1. Caitlin Porter sings with pas- 
sion during her solo in Broad- 
way Revue. 2. Whitney 
Newton catches up on some 
homework and conversation in 
Common Grounds. 




•i 




Corey Holtz 
Crista Hooven 
Zachary Horvat 
Andrew Hotle 
Michael Hoult 
Caleb Howard 



Patrick Howard 
Joshua Howells 
Jeremy Hughes 
Megan Hutchison 
Bethany Hyde 
Brooke Ipema 



Cortney Trie 
Cameron Jackson 
Cynthia Jackson 
Durrell Jamison 
Christina Jensen 
Cole Jensen 



Jonnyve Jimenez 
Matthew Johnson 
Mitchell Johnson 
Stephanie Johnson 
Justin Jones 
Truman Jones 



Brittani Jordan 
Elizabeth Jostenski 
Matthew Kearney 
Rebekah Kidd 
Min Kim 
Erica Kimmel 



FRESHMEN 15X 





O'Malley King 

Allison Kingsbury 

Danette Kinnison 




PJOTO lh\<&/\ ^-ii iACK fRVe 



Matthew Kirkpatrick 

Joel Kline 

Ashley Klossing 



1. Maggie Whittington 
and Paige Stines take 
time to finish their 
homework between 
classes in the quad. 



Ryan Knapp 

Joanna Knepper 

Pamela Knepper 

Andrew Knol 

Dayna Knox 



Kaylyn Kohler 

Megan Koop 

Sarah Kooy 

Kelly Kraker 

Kendra Krestan 

Steven Krueger 



Hannah ICruse 

Samantha Kuipers 

Jeremy Labadie 

Hannah Lamp 

Rebecca Lane 

Rebecca Lankford 



Nicole Laplante 

Tiffany Latko 

Irisha Latting 

Kenneth Lautenbach 

Christy Lawrence 

Christopher Lawson 



152 FRESHMEN 




1. Molly Anderson shows she still 

has thumbs after moving in. 2. 

Johnathan Flenaugh concentrates on 

the ball before making this shot. 



Ryan Lawson 
Jonathan Laymon 
Mildred Lechuga 
Brittany Leffew 



Ryan Lennon 
Christina Liakopoulos 
Elizabeth Lindenbaum 
Christina Lindsay 
Luke Loeber 





PtoTo UKew -TV: 3>>wie r>oRKce 




PiOTO TAKew -W: "^ReviT AWTJom 



Ryan Logan 
Marjorie Lonberger 
Timothy Long 
Jessica Lopez 
Steven Lopez 
Alexandria Lord 



Melanie Loulousis 
Kyle Lowry 
Kyle Lowry 
Jacob Lucas 
Andrew Luiten 
Jessika Maldonado 



Alex Mandeville 
Blaine Manning 
Robert Mansfield 
David Mantel 
Shayna Marin 
Reynard Marquez 



Michelle Marquis 
Ashli Marrier 
Ashlee Martin 
Olivia Martin 
Maria Martinez 
Andrew Massengale 






FRESHMEN 153 



! 




4' 




*j Kristin Mathias 




1 


J Ian Matthews 

^ Matthew Mausehund 

^ / Amanda Mazzaro 








^/ 


Christopher McAndrews 
Katie McCooey 



KateUn McElroy 

Kate McGill 

Katie McGinnis 

Allison McGuire 

Ashley McGuire 

Janelle Mclnemey 



Timothy McLane 

Joseph McLaughlin 

Jesse McNulty 

Chelsea Meadows 

Victoria Means 

Dionneve Medina 



Sarah Memenga 

Nicole Merry 

Brandon Metzger 

Sarah Metzger 

Timothy Mezera 

Jonathan Mikhail 



Joni Miller 

Shelbi Miller 

Zarah Miller 

Bradley Millikan 

Stephanie Millikan 

Marcus Minnis 



Shawn Miranda 

Erika Moeschke 

Rebecca Moisio 

John Molenhouse 

Colton Moore 

Diana Mora 




154 FRESHMEN 





Melissa Mora 
Athina Morehouse 
Hugo Moriya 
Alisa Morris 
Michael Mroz 
Matthew Murdick 



Shawn Murphy 
James Murray 
Jacob Naldi 
Kathryn Nelson 
Ryan Nelson 
Karyn Nichols 



Kevin Nichols 
John Nutter 
Elise Nygard 
Rebecca O'leary 
Kensie Ogden 
Staci Oliver 



Steve Olson 
Alex Onyett 
Walter Osorio 
Gretchen Oswalt 
Dawn Owen 
Katrina Pageloff 



Stephen Palmateer 
Brittany Pals 
Allison Park 
Vierra Parker 
David Parsons 
Aaron Partridge 



2. The freshman class shows their 

spirit during the Wacky Games at 

Ollies Follies. 




n 



f 

FRESHMEN 155 






Jeremy Payne 

Isaiah Peachey 

Kyle Peachey 

Abigail Peard 

Vanessa Pearson 

Audrey Penrod 



Tequila Perrin 

Andrea Peters 

Eilene Peterson 

Kathryn Peugh 

Holly Pflederer 

David Picone 



Jana Pierce 

Danielle Pipal 

Elisabeth Pond 

Thomas Powers 

Amy Price 

Dusstin Proehl 



Jaclyn Puroll 
Emily Queen 
Jessica Raatz 
Sonya Rabatine 
Kevin Rader 
Morgan Radzimanowski 




155 FRESHMEN 




1. Maggie Whittington takes on the 
character as one of the girls from 
"Grease" as she performs during 
Ollies Follies. 







Luverta Reames 
Aaron Reed 
Bradley Reed 
Shanice Reed 
Amy Reel 
Gerald Reid 



Maria Reynolds 
Amber Rhoades 
Nichole Rhodes 
Richard Rice 
Katharine Richards 
Heidi Richardson 



Carrie Riegle 
Alex Ripberger 
Karen Ritter 
Angela Rivas 
Robby Robinson 
Traci Robinson 



Krista Robyn 
Christina Rodriguez 
Kayla Rolling 
Morgan Rorer 
Joshua Rose 
Cherise Rosenberg 



Tanicia Rouse-Nelson 
Jennifer Rowley 
Thomas Rubarts 
Beth Ruff 
Jonathon Runyan 



Amanda Ruper 
Kyle Rybolt 
Jordan Sailer 
Erin Salzman 



J 






A / 






/ 



/ 



i ^ 

M ^ ^ FRESHMEN 1 ^7 



1. Alex Ripberger woos the ladies with 
his voice as Danny in "Grease." 2. 
Freddy Shoffstall plays tough defense 
during ultimate Frisbee. 



Jamie Sandefur 

Geoff Sauter 

Emily Schaack 

Julie Schell 

Christopher Schkerke 

Jacob Schmidt 



Brittany Schoppen 

Nathan Schott 

Brian Schrock 

Sarah Schrock 

Desiree Schroeck 

Catherine Schutt 



Hannah Scott 

Maya Scott 

Sara Scott 

Brenna Settle 

Garrett Sevigny 

Cheryl Shackleford 



Cassandra Shattuck 

Lauren Shaw 

Emily Sheren 

Sarah Shilvock 

John Shoffstall 

Tyler Shore 



Hannah Short 

Sarah Sinn 

Lauren Sinwelski 

Krista Skelton 

Samuel Smidt 

James Smit 



158 FRESHMEN 






Jalisa Smith 
Kaitlin Smith 
Kelsey Smith 
Elijah Smurthwaite 
MeUsa Sokarda 
Adriene Sonnenschein 



Shara Southerland 
Kelsey Sowards 
Bradley Speck 
Tara Speelman 
Rebecca Spence 
Emily Spunaugle 



Sarah Staal 
Alyson Staats 
Nicole Staniszeski 
Jennifer Stark 
Lyell Stark 
Josh Stauffenberg 



Bobbi Steinke 
Sarah Stephansen 
Madelyn Stephens 
Adam Steveley 
Alek Stevens 
Bryan Stevens 



Brygette Stewart 
Dale Stoops 
Jessica Storie 
Tania Stott 
Samuel Summerlin 
Mario Sunta 



Lynne Swanson 
Caitlin Sweet 
Amy Swihart 
Melissa Tanner 
Sara Taylor 
Sarah Thoeming 



<. 



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FRESHMEN 159 



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Allison Thomas 

Cambria Thomas 

Ashley Thompson 

Kristin Thompson 

Nola Thompson 

Todd Thurman 



Andrew Todd 
Danielle Tolbert 

Danek Torrey 
Mayra Trejo 

Brittany Triak 
Maritza Valentin 



Nancy Valentin 

Michelle Van Doorne 

Danielle Vander Schaaf 

Julie Vandewoestyne 

Casey Vaughan 

Nathan Villotti 



Cory Vollmer 

Desiree Vonwerder 

Jessica Voss 

Christina Vrba 

Emily Wade 

Caroline Wainwright 



Kasey Waite 

Alanna Waldvogel 

David Walker 

Kathryn Waller 

Nathaniel Waller 

Emily Walters 





1. Freshman Ollies Follies softball par- 
ticipant takes a swing at an oncoming 
pitch. 2. Ana Kate Warren organizes 
her dorm room for the upcoming 
semester. 



Vi^^o weVN -^•• 



PiDTo i>iKev> TV: 3^wvie 5^)RKee 



160 FRESHMEN 




Rachel Waltz 
Nicholas Wangler 
Ana Warren 
Emily Waskow 
Isaac Watson 
Joseph Weber 



Todd Weiderman 
Candice Weisinger 
Emily Wells 
Heather Wenzel 
Aaron Westerfield 
Elizabeth White 



Sarah Whitten 
Maggie Whittington 
Ethan Widecan 
Daniel Wiens 
Jenna Wiley 
Megan Wille 



Adam Williams 
Angela Williams 
Tim Williams 
Heather Willoughby 
Courtney Wilson 
Melvin Wilson 



Elizabeth Wirgau 
Mark Wright 
Megan Wright 
Kent Yamane 
Josh Yokley 
Magdalena Zajkowski 



Anna Zanellato 
Danae Zarbuck 
Sarah Zelhart 
Nicole Zizic 
Susanna Zwirkoski 
Ben Zwolinski 



FRESHMEN 151 




^cAi^et^ 




PiOTO UKeV> ^: iACK fRVfi 



PJdTO TAKew -W: EACK fRVe 




tW?i'YI''WW* 



t^m PARS, '^OT TlA 
HH\'i PARIS t^Kft OP 

ov\e vOk)ie "^5^. SO «T 
IS y)fTiv Ue ^5^ of 

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Art involves putting a new spin on 
life: personifying abstract concepts 
on canvas and capturing the essence 
of a moment with a photograph 
Olivet's Department of Art consists 
of 1 03 majors in six different areas. - 
These areas include art, art education, 
digital media, drawing, photography 
and painting. For art majors like junior 
Travis Smith, their success hinges on 
their ability to look at God's world with 
a fresh perspective, which requires a 
certain excitement for life. 

''iWe ^e-f- 4-0 f m!> av» ovjexci-f-e!> 
aR4- iwatjoR. eveR^^ aR-f iwatjoR 
i Kv»ovo fS iwo-f fva-fej>." -TRa^flS 







PtoTO TAKev> VI: hRlSSh -^ecK 




164 ART & DIGITAL MEDIA 



B _ 



1. students focus 

the details- during 

art class. 2. Profe 

sor Gary Thomas hel] 

Valerie Byrd choo 

a direction for hi 

painting. 3. Zac Pe 

nington brings h 

vison to life throui| 

his art. 4. Eme 

Ibanez carefully mol 

her sculpture. 5. An 

Knol gets assistan 

from Professor Thorn 

on his self portra 

in a design clas 




1. students settle in for their 
Introduction to Sociology class 
with Dr. Kent Olney. 2. Jenny 
Carlson takes a test during a 
psychology course. 3. Professor 
Robert Smith instructs his stu- 
dents via PowerPoint. 4. Kalyn 
Klontz gives the intstructor her 
full attention. 

$ciev\ce$ 



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The Department of Behavioral Scienc- 
es is comprised of 1 18 majors within 
two areas of study, pyschology and 
sociology/The department is headed 
by Kent Olney, who truly mai<es so- 
ciology interesting. Students in this 
department dive into different aspects 
of society through sociology, as well 
as the individual through psychology. 
The classes are taught through a unique 
theological perspective that is not of- 
fered through most behavioral science 
departments. 



BEHAVORIAL SCIENCES 



165 



The Department of Biological Sciences has 
many opportunities for the typical biolo- 
gy-minded student. There are 152 majors 
in the department studying one of five 
different concentrations: biology, zoology, 
environmental science, science education 
and pre-profession such as pre-med. 

The zoology program is very interest- 
ing and strong. It includes internships, a 
chance to study tropical zoology, an op- 
portunity to go to Costa Rica to research 
the tropical animals and the tropical 
rainforest biome, and several different off- 
. campus studies in countries such as India. 
The students who have, gone through the 
programs have come across great jobs 
after graduating. Some include working in 
Zoos around the country such as Brook- 
field Zoo in Chicago and animal shelters, 
become veterinarians, animal keepers, go 
into wildlife refuges, and some advance 
on to grad school 







'^loLoeicaL 
scieviccS 




1. Amber Willard injects a syrum 
into a flask. 2. Pete Smidt uses 
precision in the disection process. 

3. Brittany Thomas and Kristen Mur 
ray go to work dissecting a pig. 

4. Doug Nelson observes, while Dr. 
Dwight Ginn instructs. 



166 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 






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The Department of Business has seven 
areas (accounting, business administration, 
economics and finance, international busi- 
ness; industrial technology management 
and marketing) of study split between 302 
different majors. Each of these areas of ■ 
study has different focuses and experiences 
behind them. Sara Giove, a TA for Dr. Glen 
Rewerts (department chair), says the pro- 
fessors in the department are very friendly 
and personable. They are more than willing 
to help the students and get to know them. 
The department is also known as a great 
starting place for future opportunities. 
Many students have gone on to great busi- 
ness positions and successful internships. 




PtoTO TAKev* ^: a^tWfe r>ORK" 




t 








@ 



1. Andrew Rice reviews 
some material before a 
test. 2. Professor Don 
Daake imparts his wis- 
dom. 3. Business stu- 
dents listen intently 
during the International 
Trade Luncheon. 4. Megan 
Sherman enjoys learning 
proper etiquette at the 
luncheon . 



BUSINESS 



167 




•• 



n\Z7ZZ 



The Department of Communication is made 
of 1 66 students studying journalism, mass 
communication or communication stud- 
ies. The department also offers six distinct 
concentrations: corporate communication, 
theatre, TV/video, film studies, radio, and me- 
dia production. This group of students was 
considered unique by the department chair, 
Dr. Jay Martinson. 



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1. Sarah Giove assists 
Rachel Bedell in attach- 
ing a microphone. 2. 
Clay Urbanick and Jacob 
Jackson test their sound 
equipment . 3 . Dr . Jay 
Martinson laughs with his 
students. 4. Mike Vander- 
hei films in the commu- 
nication department. 5. 
Professor Emily Lamb Nor- 
mand proofs a paper with; 
Kate Myatt and Jasper- 
Taylor./ 

168 COMMUNICATIONS 



PAOTOT>Kev>lry:-^Rev,TAMTS/ ' 




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1. Computer science students 

are enthralled in thier lecture. 

2. Todd Thurman concentrates on 

an assignment. 3. Mat Wallace 

and David Brause troubleshoot . 

4. Sarah Hobbs assists Nathan 

Villotti on a project. 



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'■ The students of the Department of 
Computer Science are in high demand 
among their computer illiterate room- 
mates, friends and fellow students. They 
easily accomplish the troubleshooting . 
tasks that baffle most of us. But they 
learn to do much more than trouble- 
shoot. This department is made up of 42 
student majors in the areas of computer 
science and information systems. 

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\OoRK ToaeueR to oveRcowvc lARae 
O^STKUS iv\ jue vooRKPUce AS voeLl 
AS OOR !#*iW UWeS." -•%RAV\P0V\ RATTTV^ 



COMPUTER SCIENCES 



169 



1. A few education students take a 
break from their latest reading assign- 
ments. 2. Lindsey Bright flips through a 
book in Weber. 3. Alaina Hamlin and Ra- 
chel Bedell work on a project together. 




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The School of Education housed the most stu- 
dents during the 2008-2009 school year, with 
462 students according to Dr. Jinn Upchurch, 
dean of the School of Education. The School is 
divided into three nnajors: early childhood edu- 
cation, elementary education, and secondary 
education. The largest division was elementary 
education with 214 majors. The importance of 
teaching is discussed in the Bible, according to 
Upchurch. Deuteronomy 32:2 declares, 'Let my 
teaching fall like rain and my words descend like 
dew, like showers on tenders grass, like abundant 
rain on tender plants." 

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iweR." -A«>Riav»a espmota 



a 







170 EDUCATION 




L^^ 




1. Rodney Korthals uses the 
smart board to give visual in- 
struction. 2. Dennis Johnson 
works on a project for engineer- 
ing on the computer. 3. Matt 
Lyle, Jeff Lamping and Kevin 
Wakefield have some safe fun with 
the Flotech machine. 



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The Department of Engineering can 
prepare you to reach your dreams. No 
matter if your goal is to build planes or 
construct buildings, the engineering 
department is there for you. Each se-.. 
nlor creates a project that can be used 
for their own portfolio. These projects 
are intricately designed by the student 
and are overseen by professors. Dr. Ivor 
Newsham is the head of the depart- 
ment, which consists of three areas of 
study - engineering, computer engineer- 
ing, and geological engineering - with 
59 student majors within the three. 








ENGINEERING 



171 



1. The British Lit class 
takes their work outdoors. 
2. Amber Doan and Professor 
Beth Schurman carefully re- 
view a project proposal. 3. 
Dr. Rebecca Belcher-Rankin 
reads Carl Jung to her Lit 
Crit class. 4. Majors meet 
for a department doughnut 

party . 




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172 ENGLISH AND MODERN LANGUAGES 



An appreciation for more than one lan- 
guage will serve students well in this grow- 
ing and diverse culture. And the students 
in the Department of English and Modern 
Languages have plenty to appreciate. 

With study abroad options and the oppor- 
tunity to take trips to Chicago for cultural 
experiences, the 100 students within the 
department are seldom at a loss for things 

to do. 

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€v\eiU% ^m ^05>eRv) taweoaseS cS +o 
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cowvtw^)viica-(-c ef f €-c-(-NeU, Recoevijte 
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av»»> ovj5>ftR$-(-avi^ -fiia-f 6oi> i>eL«6ivf$ m 
ftxpReS$e5> -f Ro-f iv voiicciv people v»ees> -t-o 
iwvpRo^e -fiieiR Litres." -saRa 'WvicUL 




The Department of Exercise and Sports 
Science offers an education that prepares 
students for a variety of exercise and sports 
careers. Students within the departnnent find 
it beneficial and inspiring, especially because 
of the hands-on training and personable 
faculty. 

According to Scott Armstrong, department 

chairman, the professors' coaching experi- 

:"-erice makes them excellent teachers as well. 



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1. Tricia Deter bandages a foot- 
ball player's hand to prevent 
further injury. 3. Professor Carla 
Schimmelpf ennig demonstrates on a 
student for the class. 4. Stepha- 
nie Ekema reads to Anastasia White 
while getting her leg checked out. 

[ 

EXERCISE AND SPORTS SCIENCE 173 



Given the name, it's no surprise that the 
Department of Family and Consumer Sci- 
ences includes a close-knit group of students 
and professors. There are 101 student majors 
with concentrations in dietetics, fashion . 
merchandising, housing and environmental 
design, family and consumer sciences, family 
and consumer sciences education, and child 
development. "All six of the [concentrations] 
contribute to helping families, communities 
and children, which I am so passionate about," 
says Jaclyn Bollinger, a senior with a concen- 
tration in housing and environmental design, 
"it's great to be working toward bettering the 
lives of others together." 




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1. Matt Lyle and Brando 

Crombar mull over notes 

2. Jen Detrich makes 

cut to her own persona 

soundtrack. 3. Lindse 

Bergman sorts out page 

on her way into class 

4. Dr. Diane Richard 

son and Stacey Hoekstr 

share a laugh while tak 

ing some measurements 




174 FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES 



1. Dr. David Van Heemst ac- 
-ively engages with his Amer- 
ican Government class. 2. 
Tony Calero delivers a pre- 
sentation to make his points 
clear. 3. Melanie Daniels 
vigoursly takes notes during 
class. 4. Kristi Lam voices 
her opinion during a class 
with Dr. Van Heemst. 



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The Department of History and Political 
Science is one very well led departnnent on 
campus. The four areas of study in the de- ij 
partment are history, social science educa- ' 
tion, political science and public policy with 
the largest being social science education. 
Within these areas, there are 124 students.' 
Upon graduation, many of the students 
go on to teach, others go to D.C. to enter a 
world of politics, some go to law school or 
go for a Ph.D., many others go into business, 
and several even go to seminary. 

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HISTORY & POLITICAL SCIENCE 



175 



■r 




The Department of Math is full of incred- 
ibly talented professors. Each full-tinne 
faculty nnember has a doctoral degree in 
nnathennatics, and the faculty team is led by 
Dr. Dale Hathaway. Concentrations within 
the department include actuarial science, 
mathematics, and mathematics education. 
There are 33 student majors in the program 
among each of the listed concentrations. 



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1. Dr. David Atkinson gives 
an example during his Cal- 
culus III course. 2. Betsy 
Kurtz, Sondra Lynn and Amy 
Meyer contemplate mathemat- 
ics. 3. Alec Motley focuses 
intently during a math class. 

4. John Quandt goes over some 
math homework before class. 

5. Hope Denton works at solv- 

ing a math problem. 




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176 MATH 







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[1. Brittany Harris and Nicole Miller follow 
,along closely during music class. 2. Emily Ja- 
^obson v;orks on improving her vocal techniques. 
3. Ashlie McEntire, Nicole Miller, Jenna Dickey, 
ilaura Kehoe, Blake Reddick and Dr. Neal Wood- 
ruff work hard during class. 4. Merrick Robison, 
Benjamin Moore and Tyler Dossett sing for the 
3rpheus Variety Show. 



Music has always been an innportant part 
of Olivet's campus and student life. The 
Department of Music has 74 majors, each 
focusing on their own area of expertise 
within the music field. Music major Caliie 
Ivey speaks of the professors and students 
in the department very highly. She says 
the professors in the music department 
are very personable and helpful, and they 
are always willing to sacrifice their talent 
and time for the good of the students. The 
students exemplify this Christ-like behav- ^ 
ior, helping their peers to succeed in their | 
studies and pursuits. These students are | 
involved in many musical opportunities | 
outside of the department, with the de- f 
partment being a great launching board i 
for many activities and occupations. 



WOSiC 








MUSIC 



177 



flK Stud( 

" nfSri 



^.•Jl 




ents wishing to earn their Bachelor* 
of Science in Nursing degree have to first 
complete the two years of pre-nursing 
courses and Introduction to Health Care 
Professions class. They must pass an entry 
exam and submit an application. After be- 
ing admitted, 16 additional courses must be 
completed. This program is not an easy one, 
but the difficulty is what makes the program 
worth it. The professors are always there to 
encourage students. 

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w\evj-f$ avn> a4- ooR ^eS-t- iwowvev)-f-S. v)e 
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1. Brooklyn Taylor listens 
to the pulse of a classmate. 

2. Professor Patricia Ker- 
shaw gets animated while giv- 
ing a hands-on example. 3. 
Steve Zaborowski, Leah Mills 
and Liz Voss enjoy an after- 
noon nursing class. 4. Rachel 
Burke measures carefully. 5. 
Alyssa Reeves reviews her 
work before class. 





178 NURSING 




1. Geology teaching assistant Jamie 
Fearon helps Lindsey Borgman, Andrea 
Gibson and Ben Coots determine types 
of rocks. 2. Polly Root, Susan Leib 
and Tiffany Collins anticipate their 
arrival at the Rock Farm. 3. Alyson 
Staats and Amanda Siems figure out 
their homework assignment. 4. Geology 
students get hands-on with the rocks 
they are learning about in class. 

SccewceS 



The Department of Physical Sciences 
is devoted to understanding the 
things that make God's world tick, and 
using that knowledge to better the 
world around them. 



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•PHYSICAL SCIENCES 179 



Students from the Department of ' 
Social Work and Criminal Justice have 
a broad range of career options after 
graduating from Olivet — from coun- 
selor to police officer to case manager. 
But whatever they choose, Olivet stu- 
dents make a difference in their careers 
by sharing the compassion of Christ 
with those they serve. 



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SOCWL vOoRK 

ty^jS-f ice ^ 



1. Dave Quimby takes notes dur- 
ing a criminal justice class. 
2. Betzie Parker, Maggie Mar- 
tin, Rachel Dawson and Court- 
ney Bluege enjoy another day in 
their Social Work Practice III 
class. 3. Sarah Kunkes and Tif- 
fany Atkinson participate in a 
class discussion in their Crimi- 
nology class. 4. Kristen Watson 
listens intently to one of the 
children she spent time with for 
her applied learning at Divorce 
Care 4 Kids. 5. Jessica Sowden 
and Jenny Vaughn settle down for 
another class session. 



180 SOCIAL WORK & CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



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1. Daniel Sheets flips through 
his notes in Christian Theol- 
ogy I. 2. Dr. Carl Leth gives 
his wisdom to his theology 
class. 3. Kyan Glenn works 
hard on what is in front of 
him. 4. An interactive group 
meeting takes place within the 
classroom. 






wvj»$-fRieS 



The School of Theology and Christian Ministries 
is led by Dr. Carl Leth. There are 182 students 
in this major who are studying within the nine 
concentrations: biblical studies, Christian edu- 
cation, intercultural studies, youth ministry, 
children's ministry, pastoral ministry, religious 
studies, and philosophy and religion. Students in 
this department have the opportunity to attend 
conferences, mission trips, and various other 
spiritual outings. i 

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THEOLOGY AND CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES 



181 



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It seemed strange to think that Olivet had a swim club without a pool on campus, but a group of 
dedicated swimmers made it possible. 

Sophomores Amanda Hanson, Anna Mcintosh, Melissa Wright and Ashley Young shared a passion 
for swimming. So, with a little effort, they were able to get a group of about 20 students together to 
start the new swim club. 

After getting approval from ASC, there were several meetings to discuss financial issues, practices 
and goals for the club, according to Ashley. 

The swimmers each pay $2 per practice to rent the pool at Bradley Bourbonnais Community High 
School. If they had more practices, the team would have bought pool passes, Melissa says. 

The group is not considered a school team, just a school club, so they are not a part of a division. 
This means they don't compete in meets or any other competitions. 

"It would most definitely be more fun if we actually competed, but it's OK as a club," Ashley says. 
"Being a college student, you are required to do so many things for your major and you are so busy 
during the semester, it's a great break from it all. And it also helps relieve some stress by swimming 
some laps." 

The club meets about once a month to practice, where the focus is having fun and staying in 
shape. 

"It's fun," Melissa says. "Come out and try it sometime." 

184 FEATURE STORY: SWIM CLUB 




^••'R«V,TAMTto„^ 



FEATURE STORY: SWIM CLUB 




a$$ocia-<-e!> $-f \)»>ew-(- coov»cil 




186 Asc 




^^^^^he Associated Studeril 
"council, which was founded in 1 935, 
started off the year right as President 
John Keating and 21 other students 
spent a weel<end together at Grizzly 
Jacks Grand Bear Resort for their year- 
ly retreat. Faculty sponsor Jay Martin- 
son and other faculty and staff joined 
the students. This year's 50-member 
council is well rounded in a variety of 
talents, abilities, and ideas that each 
mennber brings to the team. Each 
person on the council has committed 
to being the best leader and example 
they can be to our student body. 






5. Shannon Battershell, Maya 
Scott, Kati Downs, and Jana 
Pierce enjoy getting to know each 
other on retreat. 6. ASC takes 
a vote. 7. John Keating and Joy 
Dierickx turn things upside down! 
8 . Evan Karg leads an ASC meeting 
in a devotion. 




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ASC 187 





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Q 

1. Ashli Harrier asks a question during 
a freshman council meeting in the Wil- 
liams lobby. 2. Jana Pierce, Ashli Harri- 
er, Kati Downs, Haya Scott, Angela Rivas, 
Aaron Reed, Steven Krueger, Jessika Hal- 
donado, Eilene Peterson, Desiree Schroeck 
and Stephanie Eis take time out of a busy 
schedule to smile. 3. Hillary Gilkey 
laughs a little during a meeting. 4. Soph- 
omores deliberate to get things rolling. 
5. Nathan Weeden, Katie HcDonald, Lance 
Hays, Jessica Ruddle, Alyssa Chenoweth, 
Grace Mantarian, Kyle Fellow, Victoria 
Means, Annie Lowry, Abby Bentle and Brit- 
tany Thomas are the sophomore class coun- 

for 2008-2009. 




SOPtoWORC C|>SS CDOVlCiL 
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188 CLASS COUNCIL''^^ 




1. Peter Foster, Brad Arthur, Josh- 
ua Tijerina, Kent Davenport, Hillary 
Gilkey, Brittany Petree, Joy Dierickx, 
Brittany Carpenter and Samantha Al- 
len represent the junior class coun- 
cil. 2. The council takes a break to do 
some bowling. 3. Katie Kirsch and Kim- 
berly Behning are ready to accomplish 
their tasks. 4. Brandon Crombar, Emilee 
Hill, Katie Kirsch, Audra Werntz, Cyn- 
thia Suparman, Andrew Rice, Mike Denny, 
Kimberly Behning, Melissa Fett, Jesse 
Briles, Ashley Farris, Austin Senior 
are the senior class council. 



3V\iOR Cl>S CDOWCiL 




I 



f 




Whether planning the next big 
event as a member of the social 
committee or leading worship as 
class chaplain, members of Class 
Council serve their classes in numer- 
ous ways. 

Class Council representatives are 
also involved in Associated Student 
Council, ensuring that students have 
a voice in what happens on campus. 



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189 



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1. Kailey Geiselman, Austin Se- 
nior and Jessie Briles plan the 
next big event. 2. The Social 
Committee poses for a group 
shot. 3. Jesse Briles shows off 
his box-carrying skills. 4. 
Shannon Battershell carefully 
articulates an idea. 5. Brad- 
ley Reed dressed as Waldo at 
the Candy Costume Party put on 
by Social Committee . . . Can you 

find him? 

190SOCIAL COMMITTEE 



Social Committe can be credited 
for hosting some of Olivet's finest 
events, such as the Block Party and 
the Candy Costume Fest. Students 
who attend any of the many on- 
campus events planned by the 
Social Committee owe thanks to 
committee members. 

"i-t-S U9n RevoaRpJwe- -f Look 
a-(- vo^a-f- voewe accow\pLiS2ve5>." 
--^Ri-f-f avj^ Uotwas 




^-TO 1^V<eVN ^: ^W^ ^^ 





pJoTo lhv:€y\ "W: hRiSSh -^ecK 



.vf,r talents to use by 
thpir artistic taiei lo 
cr^mginfor^atweeye-^*- 

upcoming activiut::^ 
as the VP of publicity. 




v-*^- " ' 



po'^Licrw 




DEBATE 










Sff /n on fhe free student-led debate represenfing the 

phiosophes and viewpoints cf presdentiol 

candidates Boracfe Obama and John McCain. 







1. Publicity Council poses for a 
group photo. 2. Katherin Ufkin 
and Charlie Sheets work on the 
class chapels poster. 3. Zac 
Pennington works on a design for 
a publicity poster. 

PUBLICITY 191 



wvRL 



iwew^ ReSK>ev)-(-iaL Life 




The guys of MRL shifted their focus . | 
beyond the usual repertoire this year. 
Still hosting popular events likeTCW 
and Beard Month, they also hosted a 
number of other events, including an 
all-school campoutat Fortin Villa and : 
male RA appreciation dinners. 

''i peRSowatu evjcyo^ -irU f ac-t- 

f OR -i-U iwevj ov\ cawvpi)S, pRo- 
^«>m6 oppoR4-ov»i-f leS -(-0 t>o f ow 
■(-^vmes v)fHo^)-(- i^a^me -(-o ^o o04- 
paR-f-^iwe sowvew^vCRe. aRis-f laws 
cavj s-f ILL iva>(e f ^w." 










1. Danny Leimann and Tim 
Daugherty clown around with 
food. 2. Austin Bender shows 
his ONU pride at the tailgat- 
ing party. 3. The guys in MRL 
and their candle sticks-look 
slick for their group shot. 4 
Kevin Greene and Lucas Mel- 
linger show thier Tiger pride 



192 MRL 






. The members get crazy for a group 

picture. 2. Kayla Koury cracks a 

smile in a WRL meeting. 3. Morgan 

Radzimanowski and Stephanie Scanna- 

ieco clean up after an event hosted 

by WRL. 4. Laura Schaumburg learns 

ow to defend herself in a dangerous 

situation . 



Women's Residential Life is a com- 
bination of many different women 
from each class. Their goal is to 
provide opportunities to boost 
the lives of each woman on cam- 
pus. They have planned and put 
on many popular events, such 
as Homecoming coronation, Mr. 
ONU, a self-defense class, and the 
mother-daughter banquet. They are 
led fearlessly by Amanda Siems and 
sponsored by Faith Newman. 




^ ^ 







v)oiwev)S Re.$i!>evj-(-(aL Life 

WRL 193 




•"^^^T^XfiviW^ReviT 



AMTiom 




Vt£>TO T^VIft^ 



^: ^Re\A-T ^V\TK)V\i 



The yearbook office is always buzz-| 
ing and full of life. As pictures were 1 
selected, stories were written and 
designs were created, the yearbook 
began to come together. Adviser 
Kate Morgan and executive editor. 
Annie Shaughnessy worked hard ' 
and inspired the staff to do their 
best. 

UdS aLL0M)e»> wve -f o iwec-t- wvavi^ 
v)evO people ^m ee-f wvoRe cw- 
voL>^ei> iv» ovii^eR$i+^ Life. AS 
f aR as -i-U vOoRK Goes, i Lo^e 
■6eiv)6 a paR-f of He pRoceSS 
■(-Jva-f- 3Rwas -f-Jve wf f eRew-f as- 
pec-(-S of oLi^e4- -foee-fiveR." 
- case^ '^Loowv, 




91010 ihKev\ TV: -^Rev^T hyf\Tkmi 



1 . Casey Bloom works ha 
on a yearbook design. 2 
Rachel Straub gives the 
camera a smile. 3. An- 
nie Shaughnessy conduct 
staff meeting with a gr 
4. Arissa Beck and Beth 
Hagenberg work on pictu 
and designs for the yea 
book. 5. The Aurora staf 
get together for a grou 
shot . 



194 AURORA 





PtoTOTAKev,^,^^,^™ 



pjoTo ^^Kev^ TV: i^CK -fRve 




« 



LiwviweR^LciSS 



1. The GliininerGlass staff 
pauses and poses. 2. Jes- 
sica Shumaker and Matt 
Cawvey work diligently. 3. 
Kate Rojek takes care of 
business. 4. Sports edi- 
tor of the newspaper, Jarret 
Roloff, works on a layout. 



The GlimmerGlass staff was made of 
1 1 paid members and about 20 others. 
The staff produced 11,1 2-page issues 
and one 1 6-page issue this year. Every 
other week, 1 800 copies were printed 
to spread around campus. The staff ' 
always remained well-informed about 
the world's activities in order to pass the 
news along to the campus. 

n^ivia a paR-(- of -i-Ue, &L«iwwveR- 
GiLass y)a$ a ^USSiwa. i-f 2vas "W-ew 
6Rea-(- expeRievice f or -i-U f o-(-\)Re, 
av»5> !-(- ivas '^tvi f ovj m-i-cUm^ us 
c^awee av»«> i>fc^eLop a S-f-Rovi^eR 
papeR." -TRace^ voavjsUR 




GLIMME.RGLASS 195 



Re$i5>ev^-fiaL 




Life 
S-faff 





"Your life. . .Our Mission," is the 2008-2009 Residential Life motto, 
This year's staff began to shape and form during the summer, j. 
when Director of Residential Life Donna McAllister and residentir 
directors were in continual prayer for the coming school year. : 
The many new resident assistants were led and mentored by the: 
several returning resident assistants. There were four new resider| 
directors and a new associate dean, Dwayne Mills. These student 
and staff members created a team that was willing and ready to I 
serve and fulfill this year's mission. i 

wviSS»ov) -f iviS ScivOoL "/eaR. To Lo\fe i-UxA, -f o SeR^e { 
■irUfii, -t-o Live oo-{- a Life of i TiiwoH^ Y:^^, "i?ov»^-(- Le-f- | 
av»^ov»e Look 5>om)v» ovj Woo ^ecaoSe Woo aRe Woowe, 10+ | 
Se-f av) exaiwpLe f or -f-ive "teLieveRS iv> speeciv, m Life, j 
m Love, m f ai-(-iv avii> m poRi-f-w." -i^ovjm ^cALLiS-feR 




50^1Wt++ft>> PJiO+0 



196 RESIDENTIAL LIFE STAFF 



1. The University Place RAs pos«! 

on a local fire truck for a groi 

shot. 2. Joy Dierickx amd Whit- I 

ney Rothney pose during the RA | 

retreat. 3. Williams RAs take a 

break to pose. 4. Beth Veit's t 

stops by to have a picture takeit 

5. Nesbitt RAs and RD show Olivfj 

! 
they are ready for anything. 6 

Keitha Wickey and Elise Tyma ar 

ready to have some fun this yeai 

7. Hills RAs and RD are ready fc 

another group of upperclassman 

residents. 8. A group of RAs po: 

during a weekend activity. 




RESIDENTIAL LIFE STAFF 197 





Acting on AIDS exists under the or-i 
ganization World Vision. President 
Leanna Neeley's goal is to raisel 
awareness on cannpus and show! 
others how they can get involved! 
in little ways. Acting on AIDS meets! 
twice a month, and their major in- 
volvement activity is World AIDS! 
Day. This year they hosted the Bro-| 
ken Bread Meal to show the con-j 
nection between hunger, poverty 
and AIDS. 



PiiDTO T>iKe\rt ^: "^ReWT milovfi 



Ac+-m6 ov\ 




198 ACTING ON ATDS 







1. The raembers enjoy a good laugh during 
their group photo. 2. Lindsay Houseman 
listens intently during a group meeting. 
3. Ryan Hayes and Taylor Manning pause 
for a laugh. 4. President Leanna Neeley 
leads the group during a meeting. 





PtoTO IhK&n TV: TiW STftpJiAiWSftV^ 



ASME members hone their engi- 
neering sl<ills and ready themselves 
for the transition from the academic 
world to the professional world. 
According to member Matt Lyle,- 
they do this through participation 
in practice interviews, conferences 
and various competitions. 

"A5wve See-KS -i-o pRepaae s-t-o- 
5>€.v»-fS iv»-f eRe$4-€.»? m eviaiweeR- 
ivjs f OR -f U Real M)oRL5> av)5> -(-o 
ftwivawce -(-iieiR o^eRaLL coLLeee 
expeRievjcc." -^a-f-f-^vcv) t^Le 



aiweRicav) $ocie+W 
of wveci^awicaL 
ev>6fweeR$ 




Chelsea Freed, Kevin Wakefield, Daniel 
■-iff, Elizabeth Foster and Matt Lyle line up 
-r a group shot. 2. A close-up of one of the 
iny machines the enginneering majors work 
-h. 3. Daniel Stiff, Brandon Upchurch, Kevin 
ikefield and Matt Lyle put on thier saftey 
.asses in anticipation of action. 4. Kevin 
ikefield and Brandon Upchurch have a great 
..me while working together. 






ASME 199 



1. The Biophilic 

club smiles for 

a group picture. 

2. Stephen Hamil- 
ton and Janie Som- 

mer have fun at the 
Christmas party. 

3. Paul Beaty and 
Josh Crawford work 

together on a fun 
project . 





* Pk)TO Ihyim Vi: iACK fl^ffi 



• 



"^lopjviLic 



Biophilic biology club has a far 
greater reach than just the class- 
room. Brought together by their 
love for biology, students also 
enjoy a time of community build- 
ing and fellowship. Also active in 
the community, members have 
helped with the Angel Food Min- 
istry, donated food to Kankakee 
First Church of the Nazarene, 
made cards for retirement home 
residents and held a community 
dessert contest. 



200biophilic 





«c..^^,^_^^^jm 




Capitol Hill Gang aims to bring aware- 
ness to the cannpus about pressing po- 
litical issues. Headed by student leader 
Tony Calero and faculty adviser Dr. David 
Van Heennst, the group has held debates, 
taken trips to the inauguration in Wash- 
ington D.C. and held discussions based 
on films and documentaries. During 
election season, the club hosted a mock 
presidential debate, with club members 
representing each of the presidential 
candidates and the political issues of the 
time. 

"y)e aLL 2va>fe ReSpcc-M^e ^eLief S ^e-t- 
voe cav) >(i€,\0 poU4-fc$ a$ a voa^ of 
■^Rav^civcwa 00+ av)<> expLoRjwa -f JvoSe 
opmiows awp -^ebief $^$-(-eiwS -t-J^a-f 
M)c ivoLP." -v\icoLe Kme 



ARiSSA ^eCK 



capi-fol 




^U>To i^Kev\ "W: iACK fR^e 







1. Jessica Shumaker is animated about 
her topic. 2. Matt Lyle, Ryan Hayes, 
Sarah Shivlock and Dr. Mark Quanstrom 
participate in the presidental debate. 
3. Members of Capital Hill Gang pose 
for a photo. 4. Nicole King partici- 
pates in the debate . 



CAPITOL HILL GANG 201 



y 



/ 



/ 



/ 



y 



/ 



/ 






/ 





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^^ 



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\^„ 



1. Travis Greene attempts to tip 
the ball to his opponent. 2. The 
team gathers together for a pep 
talk before a game. 3. Ryan Person 
attempts to send the ball over the 
net from the back of the court. 4. 
Mike Mroz and Scotty Vandersteen 
go in for a block. 




Club volleyball was started more 
than 1 years ago by a group of 
men who sought to play competi- 
tively. This year's 16-memberteam 
came together to further their skills 
with a goal of participating in the fi 
national tournament. Expectations 
were high, as the team has placed 
in the top 1 in their division in 
each of the past five years. 



202 



CLUB VOLLEYBALL 



\ 



N 



\ 



\ 



Hoping to share their l<nowledge 
with each other, the Computer 
Club meets to tall< about comput- 
ers and related topics. This gives 
members a chance to explain spe- 
cific products, as well as practice 
public speaking skills. The group is 
headed by student leader Aaron 
Knight and faculty adviser Dr. Larry 
Vail. The seminars and the club are 
a great way for the members to 
bond and share their knowledge. 







cowvpo-(-eR 



^^ 1 1 ) ) 
II M 




1. The Computer Club 
smiles for a picture. 2. 
Cole Berkley is willing 
to lend a hand. 3. These 
students focus on their 
tasks. 4. These club mem- 
bers listen intently. 



COMPUTER 



CLUB 203 



'W 



1 . The club during Trick 
or Treat for Necessities. 
2. Lindsay Zavitz, Andrea 
Gibson, Amanda Vander- 
pool and Erin Alleman 
color with a child at the 
Christmas Party. 3. Mag- 
gie Martin, Mike LaReau 
and Amy Rushing spend 
time together at the So- 
cial Work Open House dur- 
ing Homecoming. 4. Shannon 
Hancock, Megan Hutchinson, 
Amy Price, Kayla Button 
and Allison Park get their 
necessities at Trick-or- 
Treat for Necessities 5. 
Jessica Kroymann, Kristin 
Murry, Alissa Woods and 
Becky Boehmer bond during 
the Fall Apple Festival. 




Diakonia, the University's social worl< club, seeks to 
serve others througlnout the community. TInis year, 
members hosted an annual Christmas party for Kids 
Hope United. Kids played games, made crafts and 
opened gifts purchased by Olivet students. Diakonia 
members also participate in Lobby Day, gathering in 
Springfield with social workers from across the state. 
It's a great opportunity for students to learn how the 
law works and how they can become involved. 

•(-0 paR-f-icipafe. to+s of people cj^ooSe vji^a-f- 
e^eR aRea -i-U^ feet &o5> 6 caLL«v»6 -f iveiw 4-o, 
vOiie-f 2^eR f-f 1$ f>WoRce iSSoeS, woRSms ivOtweS 
OR cotwiwov)i+>y ReSooRce cew-f-eRS." -"^e-f-ivavi^ 
■^acovi 




so'^Tvvnrei? ^icio 




m 

204 DIAKONIA 



«>iaKOV)fa 








( 



ptoTo UKftv\ -W: -^Rev^T mTUmi 







0' i 




1. Equestrian Club takes 
a group photo during what 
they call "barn time." 2. 
The members of Equestrian 
Club, Ali Hoskins, Kris- 
ten Memenga and Abigail 
Smith, work on the new 
design for this year's 
T-shirt. 3. Abigail Smith 
rides during one of the 
Equestrian Club gather- 
ings . 



The Equestrian Club, headed by 
president Abby Smith and fac- 
ulty adviser Dr. Cathy Bareiss, has 
been involved in many events 
throughout the year. Members 
participate in lessons at Sunrise 
Farms In St. Anne, host clinics and 
free ride night at a family barn and 
particpate in a therapeutic rid- 
ing program. Students have also 
participated in intercollegiate horse 
shows. The Equestrian Club hopes 
to build strong friendships and 
relationships through their love of 
horses. 




pk)To ihYm -^i -%Rev\T hyi\iu>y\-i 



m 




so'^wrrTffi? ^uy^o 




EQUESTRIAN CLUB 



205 



^Reev) Roowv 




206 GREEN ROOM 

n 

_LL 



For aspiring actors across cam- 
pus, Green Room provides plenty 
of opportunities to see the stage 
and be seen on stage. Members 
traveled to Ghicago once each 
semester this year to see "Jersey 
Boys" and "Monty Python's Spa- 
ma lot." 

Members took to the stage 
this year in the annual 24-hour 
theater, where students write, i 
rehearse and perform plays in 
one day, and the spring play, "The 
Curious Savage." 

1. The group poses for a fun 
photo. 2. Kenny Delaney and Br 
Systma act in a quirky skit. 

3. Brad Systma reads over his 
script in complete normalcy. 

4. Brittany Thomas performs a 
skit with her fellow Green Roo 
members . 




eoi. 



t 



:^« — 

^international Justice Mission is a unique 
program that seeks to empower the 
many who fall victim to wrongdoing in 
our world. They attack the issues of slav- 
ery, sex trafficking, illegal seizure, illegal 
detention, sexual violence and police, 
brutality with a team of experts in social 
work and law. 

Olivet's chapter of IJM, in conjunction 
with the many other IJM campuses 
around the country, contributes to the 
cause by raising awareness about the 
issues and money to help keep the 
mission alive. With every dollar they 
earn and every potential contributor 
they enlighten, they make a difference 
that could affect the world in a way far 
beyond our imaginations. 




m 








1. Stacy Mahuna discusses her experience in 
Costa Rice in relation to justice. 2. Members 
of IJM gather together for a group photo. 3. 
Alii Smith leads an IJM meeting. 4. Megan Rob- 
ins, Nikki Lamb and Matt Brillion flip through 
literature that deals with justice in the 

world. 

INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE MISSION 207 



Kappa 5>eL-^a pi 




PtoTO TAKew VI: Xt^RU POTB 






Kappa Delta Pi prov'ra'^^ase for education 
majors to gain information and get ready to face 
the real world. The group is led by student leader 
Rachel Bedell and faculty adviser Sara Spruce. In 
the fall, the group invited a panel of community 
teachers representing all grades to speak to all 
education majors. They also host social events 
and volunteer events throughout the year. 



208 KAPPA DELTA PI 



1. The members of Kappa Delta Pi 
look scholarly for a group photo. 






D 



. •• 



Kappa Omicron Nu is the honor 
society for Family and Consunner 
Science majors. The society is de- 
signed to honor FACS majors who 
show exceptional academic achieve- 
ment and leadership skills. Members 
have taken a trip to Chicago to see 
"Wicked," hosted a Portfolio Day for 
the FACS department and held the 
annual FACS Department Spring 
Banquet. 



1. Kappa Omicron Nu poses for a 
group photo. 2. Students discuss 
a group project while meeting. 3, 
Bekah Regenfuss and Jessica Har- 
ris work on their portfolios dur- 
ing a meeting. 




Kappa owvicRov) v)0 





^•" ^^ STepi^y^s, 



VloTo UKev> -W-. TiTA STe9W>v\sev\ 




KAPPA OMICRON NU 2 9 




p^OTO '^KftV\ -W: «^^R^^^v V0T5 



Lambda Pi Eta-Theta Beta is the University's 
communication honor society. 

This year the organization planned Communica- 
tion Week 2009. Throughout the week, February 
23-27, Olivet faculty members spoke to, encour* 
aged and enlightened students. Communica- 
tion alumni were also invited for a question and. 
answer session. The week included a service 
project, a night of fun and games at Bickford 
House retirement community. 

Lambda Pi Eta-Theta Beta members must hold 
a 3.0 GPA or higher and, once inducted, need tol 
attend meetings and be an active member to 
remain in the group. 








PtoTO T^KeV» VI: |«\ARi^i, PoTTi 



1. Tne group gathe 
tor a meeting. 2 
Kate Rojek and Sai 
Henning discuss in 
porcant issues wit 
the group. 3. Mer 
bers of Lambda Pi 
Eta-Theta Beta sm: 
for a group photo 



^1 



210 LAMBDA PI ETA-THETA B^ft^ 




£i.. 







The Math Club is one of Olivet's 
newest organizations, with this be- 
ing the club's first year involved in 
the ASC Council. Under the leader- 
ship of Staci Martens and Sondra 
Lynn, the Math Club hosted events 
such as the Math Murder Mystery. 

"i-f-s a 6Rea-(- \0a^ -(-o cw-t^Rac-f- 
yjl-f-iv ^OOR PRof eSSoRS 00-f- 
Si!>e of class, -f 6e-(- -f kmom) 
Hftwv ov\ a peRSovjaL Level." 
-Sowf>Ra Viy\v\ 




pi£>TO UKe>ft ^'. TitA STcpiv^v\sev\ 



iwaH cLo"^ IJf 





PJoTo UKev\ -W: Tm ST€,^Wrse,v\ 




I 



1. John Chambers, Jerremy 

Howell and Tim Ascher discuss 

mathematics. 2. Terese Byrne 

and Danielle Vander Schaaf 

lay the cards. 3. Matt Upshaw 

takes a shot. 4. Betsy Kurtz, 

Dr. Dale Hathaway, Amy Grubbs 

and Amy Meyer pose for a group 

photo . 






MATH CLUB 211 



Lb 




SO^wrTTei> PlDTO 



»3 




I 



S0-6W\r7Te!> PtoTo 




212 MERC 



t^eRc 



The most common misconcep- 
tion about MERC, the Multi-Ethnic 
Relations Committee, is that it is a 
group for minorities only, accord- 
ing to club President Lindsay Rosa- 
les. "This is not true. We welcome 
people from all races and cultures," 
she says. 

The group was created to bring 
awareness to campus about the 
variety of cultures represented 
at Olivet. This year, in addition to, 
meeting regularly for a Bible study, 
the group co-hosted Harvestpa- 
looza, a night of karaoke, with Mu- 
Kappa and Proclamation Gospel 
Choir. .1 .^ 1 im_- ._. i_j .u-- 

1. Jasper Taylor listens 
carefully during a MERC 
meeting. 2. The group gets 
together for a group photo 
during one of their events. 
3. The members of MERC show 
their pride for the multi- 
ethnic club. 



'i 










-^,^!^et<^ ^VN'^"^^'^ 




^kilO TAKfeW Vi: -^ReWT AMT««OW>/ 



PtoTo UKew -?y: ^RewT AwTtom 




two 



Kappa 







^..^Re^A^^^^^"^"^^ 




1. Dolphy Biswas smiles during 
a meeting. 2. Bella Kabureo and 
Sarah Clark are focused. 3. Bel- 
la Kabureo, Nobuhle Mamaba and 
Seth Athialy have fun together. 
4. Mu Kappa members pose for a 
group photo. 



uKappa, Olivet's international club, pro- 
vides international students with a warm, 
friendly, family environment where they all 
can come together for fellowship. 

Mu Kappa is home for international students 
and most students are also involved in 
MERC, (Olivet's Multi-Ethnic Relations Club). 

This year, Mu Kappa joined with Proclama- 
tion Gospel Choir and MERC for a night of 
karaoke. 



MU KAPPA 



213 




^IDIO UKCW T/: AR55A -^eCK 



Members of the National Science Teactl^' 
ers Association love sharing science with 
others. 

With that in mind, NSTA added a new- 
program to their club this year called '"-' 
the Stationary Science Circus. Members, 
of NSTA help the science department - 
when groups of visitors come to campus 
and they also runs the Traveling Scienci: 
Circus. The club visits elementary schools 
to conduct demonstrations with the stu- 
dents, including the ever-popular "Moor 
on a Stick" demonstration, showing the-; 
phases of the moon. 




v^s+a 






1. The NSTA group smiles in front of the 
planetarium. 2. Julie Watson helps teach 
the kids about science. 3. Sarah Palm 
reads a book to a student during Travel- 
ing Circus. 4. This group has fun in their 
ly hats. 







214 NATIONAL SCIENCE TEACHERS ASSOCIATION 




ptoTo UKev\ '^'. -%RewT hv\iu>y\-i 



l\ 



I 







Whether organizing blood 
drive events or the Senior 
Health Fair, mennbers of 
Olivet's Nursing Student 
Association enjoy helping 
the comnnunity by spread- 
ing awareness of a variety of 
health-related topics. At the 
highly anticipated Health Fair, 
students set up booths to 
display health-related infor- 
nnation, answer fellow stu- 
dents' questions and provide 
resources for all who attend. 



1 . Megan Schwind and Meredith 
Hoppe have fun together. 2. 
Melissa Mclnerney and Emily 
Lewis are focused on the task 
at hand. 3. Jessica Jones and 
Sarah Helmker enjoy spend- 
ing time in a meeting. 4. The 
group smiles and gets, prac- 



tice ! 



«*' 



■mmm» 



NURSING STUDENT ASSOCIATION 2 15 

• ft 




PtoTO UKeV\ -^-Y: -^ReVlT WTtom 



Oll^^-i- 



aeoLoQicaL 





year, the Olivet Geological Society 
was comprised of about 30 rock-lovers. 
The club was a very active one this year. 
They went hiking, on camping trips, gee- 
caching, trips to the Field Museum and 
movies nights in the Planetarium. There 
was also an annual spring camping trip 
to the Illinois Caverns in southern Illinois 
in April. 

"Mle aRe 5>fc5>«ca-f e!> -f-o -i-U ai>vav»ce- 
twev^-f of KwoM)L€.!>ee m zm i-U 
ev):yo^twev)-(- of i-U wa-f oRaL eaRH 
avjD aLL -i-Wdi-i- !•<- covj+aiws, a$ &of> 
cRea-(-ft!> -f-JvRo^jSiv US cotwiwa\05>." 
-SoSaw Lei3 






216 



OLIVET GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



1 . The society poses by 
the planetarium where tl" 
spend some of their time 

2. Jamie Fearon, Tiffany 
Collins, Susan Leib and 
Katie Eccles point out 
the sign's instructions. 

3. Tiffany Collins, Ja 
mie Fearon, Katie Eccle; 
and Polly Root take in 1 
glory of God' s creation 

4. Jamie Fearon, Katie 
Eccles, Susan Leib, Sam 
Smidt and Polly Root po: 
in front of T-Rex on a 
club outing. 




He-fa 



■^Ke^A^-.-^R^v^^^^'^"'''^ 








^hi Alpha Theta, the history honor 
society, strives "to promote a 
greater understanding and ap- 
oreciation for history among our 
students," according to president 
Amanda Roach. 

Olivet's chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, 
:Mu Zeta, along with the political 
science honor society, brought 
Rich Cizik to campus. He is the con- 
troversial former vice president for 
governmental affairs for the Na- 
tional Association of Evangelicals. 

He is an "outstanding member in 
khe field of history and political 
science," says Amanda. He spoke in 
several different sessions with the 
students. 



1. Brian Welter makes a 

point during a. meeting. 2. 

The Phi Alpha Theta team 

I poses for a group picture. 

i. Daniel Quanstrom listens 

intently. 4. Amanda Roach 

is full of smiles. 




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PHI ALPHA THETA 



217 








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The Proclamation Gospel Choir is^^ 
a choir of 54 students who have a 
heart for worship and nnusic. Led 
by faculty adviser LaMorris Craw- 
ford and student leader Jasper ' 
Taylor, the choir travels to local 
churches and throughout the 
region. They also participated in -^' 
a Martin Luther King Jr. Service at 
Second Baptist Church and held 
two on-campus concerts. This 
sunnmer, they have been invited 
to the Nazarene General Assenn- 
bly in Orlando, Fla. 






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1. The choir is into the music. 2. 
Jordan Eggleston, Chris Tolbert and 
Ben Coots project their voices. 3. 
Jasper Taylor leads the choir dur- 
ing practice. 4. Kayla Davenport and 
Becky Hazen worship during practice. 
5. Jasper Taylor lifts up his voice 

to the Lord. 

218 PROCLAMATION GOSPEL CHOIR 



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For the first time in at least 1 years, Psi 
Chi, the psychology honor society, had a 
male president this year. 

When psychology was first started, "you 
could not get into it if you were a fe- , 
male, so it is a lot different today," says 
Derek Phillips, Psi Chi president. The field 
changed from all male to predominantly 
female. 

With their male leader, the club had fun 
together and worked hard for people in 
need. 

They teamed with Diakonia forTrick or 
Treat for Humanities, trick-or-treating 
for canned goods to donate instead of 
candy. -lu- r m.r- -iLu-.-i m ■ - i .l. ■ 

1. Derek Phillips and Laura 
Maiolo chat during a group meet- 
ing. 2. Crystal Cheever, Dr. 
Kristian Veit and Lily Gonza- 
lez listen intently. 3. Derek 
Phillips and Laura Maiolo chat 
during a group meeting. 4. Mem- 
bers of Psi Chi pose for a group 

photo . 



PSI CHI 



219 



i 



1. Seth Athialy, Jordan Maurer 
and Kyle Saffell sing during 
the Veterans Day service in 
chapel. 2. The students stand 
in formation. 3. Salvador 
Rivera-Soto is ready for ac- 
tion. 4. Caleb Erway and Ryan 
Herr take a minute to check 
out their surroundings . 




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Olivet's ROTC is made of 85 cadets who 
work hard to represent the Roaring 
Tiger Battalion. The program is lead by 
Major Jason Creek, faculty adviser and 
director of the Department of Military 
Science and Cadet/Lieutenant Colonel 
Ca-leb Stewart, cadet battalion com- 
mander. In only their second year as a 
battalion, the Roaring Tigers placed first 
at the annual Ranger Challenge and . 
won their division at the Flying Irish 
Invitational basketball tournament. 







220 ROTC 



\ 



'The Student Education Association provides 
'valuable infornnation to future teachers, while 
also providing opportunities for hands-on 
experiences. 

•Members of SEA work throughout the year 
!with younger students in the area, going to 
..theirdassroonns to help them become better 
students. 



We read to younger students; we work in 
the classroom with them. Being able to work 
with students individually can help them to 
understand something better with a little 
one-on-one time," says SEA vice president 
Colleen Smith. 

The interactions also benefit Olivet students 
by giving them first-hand experience in their 
field and allowing them to build their portfo- 
ios. 




PtoTO T?>KeM Vi: l>Rmi M\lU>Yti 







1. SEA is all smiles for their group picture. 

2. Bethani Wilson and Michael Schimp spend time 
with students. 3. David Anderson and Neil Love 
assist a student during an after school program. 
4. Brittany Scruggs is willing to lend a hand. 



s'^22T. ~ 



1. The SIFE group 
looks professional 
in their group shot 

2 . Students attend 
concert held by SIF 
at Romer Bakery. 3. 
Professor Lynda All 
and. Andrew Rice dis 
cuss current projec 
for the SIFE team. 
4. Billy Beaumont 
and Bob Workman giv 
their opinion durin 
a meeting. 




222 SIFE 



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Students in Free Enterprise 
actively pursue personal devel- 
opment through educational 
endeavors. From working with 
ocal entrepreneurs to teaching 
budgeting in fourth grade class- 
rooms, they apply the principles 
of free enterprise for the better- 
ment of our community. 

This year, ONU SIFE had approxi- 
mately 35 members bring their 
creative energies to 26 active 
projects. The team has been 
named regional champion in 
each of the last six years. 



1. The group poses 
for a picture in S4F 
:t:yle. 2. Jake Smith, 
'ustin Vanderhoof and 
Brad Moore are per- 
fecting their craft. 
?. Abby Doud gives it 
all. 4. Alex Green 
:d Josh Hjort perform 
a skit. 



II 







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110 







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The comic relief on campus comes from 
the group of students who call them- 
selves Spoons 4 Forks. This year's club 
members were president Jacob Smith, 
Scott Hale, Brad Moore, Dustin Vander- 
hoof, Tyler Hull, Abby Doud, Joshua Hjort, 
Alex Green, Alexa Bocanegra and Charlie 
Leimann. 

The club performed six times this year. To 
prepare for the performances, the group 
practiced once a month. 

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SPOONS 4 FORKS 



223 



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student Dietetic Association members 
have a P-sion for raising awareness 
fo, the many areas of the dietetc 

field. Led by Becky Closser and Enn 
Sandoz and faculty sponsor Cathenne 

Anstrom, 5DA is involved in many 
act vtie throughout the year, such as 
hold ng the annual Christmas cook,e 
baig fundraiser and helping a local 
hospital during National Nutrition 
MonthinMarch.Thestudentslovebe- 

ing involved in this group and bnr^g 
ing attention to this important field. 



1. Becky Closser, Martha Harrouff, 
Tara Hartley, Erin Sandoz, Blaire 
Burk and Connie Whitefide model 
their Christmas cookies. 2. Con- 
nie Whitefide works hard to create 
a cute cookie. 3. Bekah Regenfuss, 
Allison Goedhart and Jessica Harris 
love working together. 4. The group 
smiles for a picture. 




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224 SDA 





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1. SUFACS members Brandi Meyers, 
Lauren Versweyveld, Lauren Erdahl, 
Dana Ferguson, Jaclyn Bollinger, 
Abby Smith and Amanda Ter Beest pose 
for a picture. 2. Abby Smith and 
Amanda Ter Beest pay close attention 
during a SUFACS meeting. 3. Lauren 
Erdahl and Lauren Versweyveld are 
in deep thought about the upcoming 
fashion show. 4. Amanda Ter Beest, 
Abby Smith and Dana Ferguson spend 
time in the textiles lab looking for 
just the right fabric for the fash- 
i o n s h o vj . 




SUFACS, the local unit of the American 
Association of Family and Consumer Sci- 
ence, brings together students interested 
in dietetics, fashion merchandising, hous- 
ing and environmental design, family and 
consumer sciences, family and consumer 
sciences education, and child develop- 
ment. 

The organization's annual fashion show 
isa.fundraising event that the group works 
diligently on throughout the year. 

From, "practicing, trying on outfits, and 
putting up decorations and advertise- 
ments," everyone teams together for the 
event, Jaclyn Bollinger says. 

Throughout the year, the group gained 
experience outside of the classroom, 
including a day in Chicago, and had fun 
doing it. 







SUFACS 



225 



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Seventh Reel is the campus' film and mo 
ie club. The group was started in 2004 by 
Hahnah Jackson, and Derek Bowsheir has 
been the adviser for the past two years, 
Sarah Giove is now the club president/ 
club hosts many events throughout thi 
year, including campus film nights, sho 
ing movies such as, "Indiana Jones,""The 
Dark Knight,"and "It's a Wonderful Life." 

The year ends with the club's biggest 
event, a campuswidefilm festival. The 
club puts on many events that the whdl 
student body can participate in and enjo 




1 . Sarah Giove and 
Amy Duerrwaechter co 
template which movie 
to choose during a 
movie night. 2. Ad- 
viser Derek Bowshie 
films members of th 
Seventh Reel group, 
3. Members of Sev- 
enth Reel hold up s 
classic movies that 
they enjoy watching 



m 

226 SEVENTH REEL 




1 . Sigma Tau Delta 
members smile for the 
camera. 2. Dr. Shir- 
ley MacGuire reads Dr. 
Seuss. 3. Brian Wel- 
ter, Professor Dave 
Johnson, Dr. Rebecca 
Belcher and Leigh Sul- 
lan pose after their 
Dr. Seuss presenta- 
tion. 4. Students pose 
for a photo at an Eng- 
lish conference. 




Olivet's chapter of Sigma Tau Deita, 
the English honors society, is commit- 
ted not only to recognizing students 
who have reached high achievement 
in the English language and literature, 
but also to fostering literacy in society 
and an appreciation of English and 
iterature across campus. 



Students have provided research 
materials for English students abroad, 
submitted written pieces to the Sigma 
Tau Delta International Convention 
and hosted a Dr. Seuss Reading Night 
for the community. 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 



227 




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As You Wish President Stephen 
Holienberg's goal is to spread 
the Gospel and encourage 
believers through music. As 
You Wish, an a cappella sing- 
ing group, meets twice a week 
to practice in Larsen.They sing 
in coffee shops, nursing homes 
and even on the streets. After 
five years on campus. As You 
Wish became an official club in 
February 2008. 



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230 AS YOU WISH 



1. Jordan Thompson and Seth Athialy warm up during prac- 
tice. 2. Jordan Thompson, Seth Athialy and Stephen Hollen- 
berg' get creative with their group photo. 3. The group gets 
animated during a fun practice. 4. Stephen Hollenberg per- 
forms in a unique way. 



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Before Tomorrow is a youth 
ministry team that leads wor- 
ship at camps and retreats, as 
well as in chapel and in differ- 
ent music venues on campus. 
They spend part of the summer 
touring different camps, lead- 
ing students in worship. The 
group loves working together 
and leading our student body 
and others in worship. 




1. The band, Harrison Agan, Tyler 
Hull, Chris DeMerrell, Liz Agan, 
Courtney Cryer, Abby Pleasant and 
Wes Sprague, smile for a picture. 

2 . Wes Sprague and the band lead 
worship. 3. The team takes time 
out to pray. 4. Wes Sprague, Ty- 
ler Hull and Chris DeMerrell en- 
joy some fun and relaxation in the 
mud. 







m 



'BEFORE TOMORROW 231 




This year the Brass Trio was comprised 
of three brass players: a trumpet player, 
a French horn player and a trombone 
player. Junior Brittany Harris, the leader of 
the Trio, asked the two other members, 
Merrick Robison and Blake Reddick, to 
play in the group with her to perform at 
her recital in March. Throughout the year 
each member was involved in various 
chamber concerts. 

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voe cav» ae-(- -fosefUR av»t> pta-y 
iwoSic vOe Lo^e. if kv> Uim ^ 
^Rovo m ooR iwoSic dfiiUHeS ^m 
f Rievi!>Sivip." -^eRRlCK RO^ISOV) 








1. Blake Reddick reads his 
music with precision. 2. 
Brittany Harris practices 
for her next performance. 
3. Brittany Harris, Merrick 
Robison and Blake Reddick 
show off their instruments in 
their group photo. 4. Merrick 
Robison skillfully plays his 
trumpet . 



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232 BRASS TRIO 






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1. Erin Blucker, Amy Alford and 
Christy Bell warm up their vocal 
cords. 2. Ashley McGuire and Jessy 
Voss join the group in song. 3. Ac- 
companist Kate Hausken sticks to the 
sheet music during practice. 4. Mar- 
tha Dalton uses hand gestures to con- 
duct her choir. 5. Michelle Imig and 
Kristin Mathias prepare for another 
successful year. 



• Chrysalis is an ali-women's choir 
V that has had several performances 
on campus and off. They per- 
formed at concerts such as Messiah, 
and Sounds of the Season, and ■ 
they also went on a Midwest tour 
to many Nazarene churches. This 
close-knit, talented choir is directed| 
by Martha Dalton. 

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CHRYSALIS 233 



Concert Band consists of a group 
of musically gifted students. The 
group is the oldest ONU musical 
organization. They put on the Win- 
ter Showcase each year. The Con- 
cert Band changed leadership this 
year, finding a new director in Ryan 
Schultz, but their overall purpose 
remains the same: to glorify God 
through music. 

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peRf oRtwfvie av»5> vOork«v»6 our 
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1. Tim Phillips plays his tuba with his 
fellow tuba players. 2. Elise Nygard and 
Josh Severs concentrate carefully to hit 
the right note. 3. Amy Loeffler and the 
trumpet players are ready to begin their 
piece. 4. Ian Smith focuses on his music 
during band practice. 



234 CONCERT BAND 







I 




1. Concert Singers have beauti- 
ful voices as well as beautiful 
smiles. 2. Reuben Lillie, Emily 
Jacobson and Allison Thomas give 
it their all in practice. 3. Jen- 
na Dickey warms her vocal chords. 
4. Holly Huff hits the high note 



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The voices that make up Con- 
cert Singers treat audiences to 
nnusic ranging from classical to 
jazz. Although singers enjoy the 
performances, the arduous audi- 
tion process is not quite as fun. 
Students must perform a classica 
and jazz piece during auditions, 
sight read and easily pick up for- 
eign languages to be a part of the 
selective group. 

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CONCERT SINGERS 235 



The Handbell Choir has a long-standing tradi- 
tion at Olivet, including tours to Europe sev- 
eral years ago. In the year 2000 the choir was 
fornned again to perform at Christnnas and has 
been going strong ever since. The 2008-2009 
choir had 1 4 students. Dr. Neal Woodruff served 
as staff sponsor at the beginning of the school 
year, and then Katherine Benson took over. The 
choir has played Departnnent of Music concerts 
and at area churches. This unique nnusical choir 
is a wonderful addition to our Olivet connmu- 
.nity. 

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of aLL twa^oRS voivo ey\isos pLa^ma iwo- 
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f oaiw -fivRovoma?" -KRr$-(-ev» eR»>aivL 




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Aav»»>3eLL c^orii 







1. A group of students practice 
and ring their bells in harmony. 

2. Amy Bell concentrates on her 
bell playing. 3. Jen Wilkerson 
plays her bells in practice. 4. 
The bells are ready to make mu- 
sic. 5. Katherine Benson joins 
in the bell chorus. 




^k>To iAKev\ irv: d^tAfe s>oRKee 



236 HANDBELL CHOIR 



II 




1. The percussionists keep the beat in 
class. 2. Jeremy Gibson plays with a 
"smile" on his face. 3. Dr. Don Reddick 
leads the jazz band during the Candy Cos- 
tume Fest. 4. The saxophones play in sync 
5. The band practices during a rehearsal. 



VlOTO 



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This year 23 members participated _,- 
in Jazz Band. Each student interested ^ 
in joining the band auditioned at the 
beginning of the academic school year, 
according to Dr. Don Reddick, chairman 
of the Department of Music. One event 
in which the Jazz Band played was at the 
Candy Costume Fest held in Chalfant, 
where each member dressed up and 
played their instruments in character. 

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The ONU marching band fired up the 
football team and fans with tunes such 
as "Eye of theTiger"and"The Final Count 
Down" between plays. On occasion, the 
band cheered them on with their popular 
"roller coaster" cheer. At halftime, they 
took to the field with a show consisting of 
tunes from Cirque Du Soleil and popular 
film composer John Williams. 

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Sov\, ee-f -f rw6 Uf-f-cR as v)e 60. i cava 
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Hao His Seasow." -tiwv P^iLLips, 
■(-ive 3aMr>^ ovirf oRtw twavoa^eR 



1 . Color guard members add en- 
ergy to the halftime show. 2. 
Olivet's mascot grooves along 
with the band in the stands. 3. 
The clarinet section plays in 
unison. 4. Nathan Lacher stands 
in line with the band during the 
halftime show. 5. A band member 
adds to the tune from the side- 




line 










238 MARCHING BAND 




1. Orpheus Choir sings powerfully 
during a performance. 2. Laura 
DeMerrell enjoys performing dur- 
ing a concert. 3. Lindsay Close 
concentrates on her part. 4. 
Blake Reddick and Laura Fleschner 
use their acting skills during 
the Orpheus Variety Show. 



so'^wnrei? ^iDio 




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RPivCOS 



Orpheus Choir ministers to Olivet students and the 
surrounding area through beautiful and uplifting 
music The choir was founded in 1 932, and is directed 
by Dr. Jeff Bell. This year, the choir was made up of 
63 students from various majors across campus. The 
choir hosted their annual variety show, which was a 
wonderful night for all who attended, filled with mu- 
sic, skits and much laughter. The choir had many op- 
portunities to sing and travel, including fall, winter and 
spring tours throughout the ONU Educational Region. 
They also performed Bernstein's Chichester Psalms 
with the Kankakee Symphony Orchestra in February 
This summer they will perform at the Church of the 
Nazarene General Assembly in Orlando, Florida. 










ORPHEUS 239 




2. Karin Mick, Kristen Er- 
dahl, Josh Woods and Susan 
Leib are ready to tackle 
another concert. 1. Karin 
Mick plays her violin with 
intensity. 4. Kristen Erdahl 
still practices after many 
years of experience. 3. Josh 
Woods and Susan Leib use 
their time wisely to prepare 
for future events. 



Vk)Towe>rt^-.^«vie!^)RKee 



Karin Mick, Kristen Erdhal and 
Josin Woods are the violinists and 

-Susan Leib stands alone at the 
cello. These are the mennbers of 

:the 2008-2009 String Quartet. 

*ln its third year, they play for the 
President's Dinner, weddings, 
campus events, and a Christmas 
concert. Kristen Erdahl acts as 
the leader of the student group, 
while Dr. Neal Woodruff serves as 
faculty sponsor. 





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240 STRING QUARTET 



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IV 



1. The men put what they 
have learned into prac- 
tice. 2. Derek Corcoran 
plays tunes for the men to 
follow. 3. Seth Athialy, 
Matt Kee, Jerry Schell- 
er and Eric Barkman show 
their readiness to learn. 




The nearly 20 members of Testa- 
ment Men's Choir traveled for 
three different tours and sang 
during Fall Revival and Christmas 
and spring concerts. They also 
were honored by being a part 
of the memorial service for 2008 
graduate Dan Walker. Unlike any 
group on campus, there was a 
special bond between the guys, 
according to Stephen Wolfe, vice 
president of Testament. Their spe- 
cial bond was brotherhood in the 
name of Christ. 




PtoTo T?iKew -M: Titw srepjAwscw 



TESTAMENT 241 




OV\iWeR$iTif 
ORCiveSTRA 



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1 . Danielle Urf er uses hei| 
unique talent of playing 
the harp. 2. Jessica Brown 
s: goes for perfection while , 
playing the violin. 3. 
Joel Chardoneau uses his 
flutist skills to prac- 
tice. 4. Merrick Robison, 
Blake Reddick, Ian Mat- 
thews and Reuben Lillie 
blow their horns. 







University Orchestra is a uniqy^* 
college orchestra because it is 
comprised completely of under- 
graduate students. The group of 
about 50 students performed aS 
the fall, spring and Christmas con- 
certs, in the spring musical, in the 
January clinic concert, and in the 
Commencement concert. 

''l-i- f eeL$ LfKC Recess ^ecaoSe 
■(-iveRe \SW-^ a Lo-f of iwevj- 
■i-^L LeaRvjme. i-t-^ vjo-f a^oof 
S-(-0!>^cv»a a "SooK; J-f S a^oo+ 
^a^ivjQ f ov»." --^Riavj KoSeK 




242 UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA 




PiOTO TAKeW TV: l3hti^i€, l^ORKee 



1. Joel Chardoneau, Kristen Er- 
dahl, Laura Kehoe, Rachel Medley 
and April Becker line up for a 
group shot. 2. Joel Charbonueau 
plays a tune with a close eye on 
his music. 3. Rachel Medley and 
Kristen Erdahl practice to per- 
fection. 4. Laura Kehoe does her 
part . 



The Wind Quintet consists of Joel 
Chardoneau, Kristen Erdahl, Laura 
Kehoe, Rachel Medley and April 
Becker. They play concerts in the 
area as representatives of Olivet's 
Department of Music. 



"voc ^la^(e a Lo-f of i'i^e,is, 
dim ("(- iS a 6005? -fii^e -f-o 6e-(- 
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WIND QUINTET 



243 




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1. The Olivetians sing dur-« 
ing their regularly sched- 
uled practice. 2. Jenna 
Dickey and Luke Olney sing 
loudly during a practice 
for an upcoming perfor- 
mance. 3. Luke Olney, Jenna 
Dickey, Ben Moore, Katrina 
Hurt, Luke Frame, Stephanie 
Fleschner, Blake Reddick, 
Megan Reed and Merrick 
Robison pose for a group 
photo . 



SO'tt^iTTep ptoTo 



244 THE OLIVETIANS 



The Olivetians are a musical singing group tiiat 
Inas been touring and singing since 1950. This year 
they sang in chapel and traveled to churches on 
the Olivet region. The group has had many exciting 
opportunities during the year to minister and sing 
for God's glory.This year's group members are Jenn, 
Dickey, Stephanie Fleschner, Ben Moore, Blake Red 
dick, Katrina Hurt, Luke Frame, Megan Reed, Merrick 
Robison and Luke Olney. 

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Stylus is a new music group made up of Dave Mohr, 
Greg Cobb, Jeremy Keller, and Patrick Cole. The mem- 
bers of the group wanted to portray a new look to wor- 
ship, and they enjoyed taking traditional worship songs 
and rearranging them into their own jazz-fusion style. 
The members believe that God wants to use them and 
their music as a tool to communicate His love to those 
who hear it. 



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Waip -i-U oppoR-t-ovii-f^ -f MioRK vOjH Sotwe of -i-lA 
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^Rcvjs 6LoR^ 4-0 iviS v»aiwe/' -pa-f rjck coU 




1. Greg Cobb shows his amazing 
saxophone skills. 2. Dave Mohr 
gives a guitar solo during a 
show at Olivet. 3. Stylus poses 
for a serious group shot. 4. 
The band performs their unique 
sound for the crowd. 



STYLUS 



245 



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L. 



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1. Nick Darland holds the ball in place 

for Josh Howells. 2. Marshall Fraley 

holds on the ball. 3. Lukas Burr carries 

a flag across the field in memory of Dan 

Walker . 



248 



SPORTS: FOOTBALL 




Before the fall of 2008, senior Mike Murphy had never worn a football ~- - 

uniform. Since he attended a snnall high school without a team, he 
never had the opportunity to play. 

Without the foundation of skills that most college players 
come equipped with, he knew that he couldn't compete at the co 
legiate level. But as a football fan, and avid supporter of theTigers, he 
always wondered what it would be like to be a part of the team. After 
some encouragement from friends on 
the team, he decided to give it a shot. 

He had no illusions about be- 
ing a great player, but saw playing as 
an opportunity to enjoy a memorable 
experience. 

"What could I lose?" Mike says. "I 
didn't really expect much of myself." 

Mike began training in the 
summer of 2008 under the guidance of 
teammate Andy Nielson and assistant 
offensive line coach Josh Lindstrom. 
Using a weight training regiment and a 
routine of football drills, he did every- 
thing he could to prepare. But the two- 
a-day workouts in the fall still proved 
challenging. 

"It was pretty hardcore," he says, 
laughing."! had never done anything 
like it before, so it was tough." 

Even more than the intensity 
of the training, he was impressed by 
the unity of the team — and by their 
acceptance of him. 

"Everyone was very encourag- 
ing, and they always pushed me on, 
even though I wasn't necessarily an 
asset to the team." 

The highlight of Mike's season was in a game against Trinity 
International University, a game the Tigers won 44-10. His parents were 
in attendance, and with the team comfortably in the lead, the crowd 
started to chant his name. In a moment reminiscent of a famous scene 
from the classic sports film Rudy, Mike ran onto the field and took part 
in one play. 

"It was a cool experience," he said. "I was pumped." 



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4. The Tigers come to- 
gether as a team for a 
photo. 5. The defensive 
line gets in position for 
the play. 6. Quarterback 
Ryan Forneris looks for 
an open teammate. 



The Tigers finished the sea- 
son with a 4-7 record, 3-4 
in the MSFA. They ended . 
with a win over the Univer- 
sity of Saint Francis at Ward 
Fieid. The 27-1 victory was 
a strong final note to coach 
Gary Newsome's career as 
the Tigers' head coach. 



Running backMarsliall Fraley was 
nanned tlie NAIA Player of tlie Week 
three times, and safety Rob Foley 
was once named the NAIA National . 
Defensive Player of the Week. Eleven 
Tgers earned Mid-States Football 
Association Midwest League hon- 
ors. The new head coach, Don Lee, 
started working with the team in the 
spring, bringing a new system and 
high hopes for a strong upcoming 
season. 



S'PORTS: FOOTBALL 



249 



Sophomore Jose Villa has been playing 
soccer since he was 6 years old and started 
playing competitively when he was 1 1 . He 
has loved it ever since. 

"It is one of my passions. I have fun play- 
ing, and I just tune everything else out," he 
says. 

Having played for so long, Jose has ac- 
quired a lot of skills that make him stand out 
from other players. 

Being able to visualize the field and his 
surroundings at all times are just a couple of 
his strengths. 

"I would also consider myself a person that 
leads by example," he says. 

Head coach Justin Crew describes Jose as 
hard-working and humble. 

"I respect him as a player and a person," 
the coach says. 

That is why Jose was chosen to be next 
year's team captain. 

Jose's greatest accomplishment as a soc- 
cer player has been to play at the college 
level. 

"I chose to play at ONU because I really 
felt comfortable when I came to try out,"Jose 
says. "The coaches and players were 
really friendly and talented." 

As captain, Jose says his goals 
will be to win the conference and 
to qualify for nationals. With seven 
returning starters from this season 
the team will be strong again. 









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1. Christopher Walker 

prepares to send the ball 

into the goal. 2. Billy 

Jackson steals the ball 

from an opponent. 3. A.J. 

Carraway keeps the ball 

out of reach from the 

other team. 



250 SPORTS: MEN'S SOCCER 




# 






IS socceR 




For the first time in school 
history, the men's soccer team was 
ranked in the top 25 in the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletes 
with a season record, of 1 0-3-5. Each^ 
oftheten wins were shutouts. "It was 
a good, solid year," says Justin Crew, 
head coach. 

There were 23 players on 
the team this year, with one student 
manager. The team was lead by team 
captains John-Philip Troglio, Vincent 
Mkhwanazi and Chris Walker. 




?iDTo T>>Kev\ -W: Tiw STepj^v»sev\ 



4. The men's soccer team 
poses for a group picture. 

5. Rodrigue Fontem passes 
the ball to a fellow team- 
mate. 6. Nigel Dillard 
flies through the air to 
get to the ball first. 



Three players, Rodrigue Fon- 
tem, Mkhwanazi, and Matt Walker, 
were first team ail-conference players, 
and Josh Ayers was a second team 
all-conference player. The starting 
goal keep, Matt Walker, was also Con- 
ference Player of the Week twice and 
was ranked in the top ten in the NAIA 
for goals against average. 




SPORTS: MEN'S SOCCER 251 



^ 



Anna Kolber is a senior forward i^*^ 

r^m \A/3Hc\A/^^rth III Mar rn;:irh Rill R^hr ! 



Anna Kolber is a senior forward 
from Wadsworth, III. Her coach, Bill Bahr, 
describes her as being a "big parf'ofthe 
team, and even calls her the "spiritual 
mentor." Anna not only took on the role 
of being a spiritual mentor, but she had 
made it a part of her lifestyle. 

"God had a plan by putting 
me on the ONU women's soccer team, 
and I pray that I was able to be a leader 
through my lifestyle to show other's 
what a wonderful God we serve," she 
says. 

The 23 players all have many 
different personalities, but according to 
Anna, everyone's differences make up 
such a dynamic team. "When the best 
of every person comes out to play the 
game of soccer, we are united to be the 
best that we can be," Anna says. 

When she's not on the soccer 
field, Anna loves to play any other kind 
of sport, read, knit, bake and decorate 
cookies. Her favorite memory was the 
hard-earned victory in the NCCAA 
championship. 

"In that moment you realize 
that all your jogging, sprinting, early 
mornings, sore muscles, long hours, 
and so much time spent towards 
making the team what it is, is com- 
pletely worth it! I will never forget 
that experience!" 



1. Janel Schmitt prepares 
to take a kick in order to 
keep the ball from her op- 
ponent. 2. Darcy King gets 
the game going by throw- 
ing the ball in. 3. Megan 
Taylor gears up for a big 

kick. 



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252 SPORTS: WOMEN'S SOCCER 





vOot^ev^'S 



socceR 




Down in Kissimnnee, Fla., the 
ONU women's soccer teann made his- 
tory by winning their first national title, 
2-1 , against The Master's College in the 
NCCAA tournament. Overall, they had 
an outstanding record of 1 5-7-1 in the 
Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Confer- 
ence. 

In the NCCAA tournament, 
where they reigned as champions, Dan- 
ielle Johnston was named Tournament 
MVP, Brittany Hengesh earned the title 
Tournament Defensive MVP, and Rachel 
Page, Michelle Davis and Janel Schmitt 
were selected to the all-tournament 
team. 



^ * 



■4. The women's soccer team 

poses for a group picture. 

5. Rachel Page gets into 

the game as she keeps the 

sball from her opponent. 6. 

Michelle Davis and Janel 

Jchmitt are happy about the 

game . 



m^O IhKm ^: i6ReV>T MllDV^i 




Michelle Davis and Janel 
Schmitt were named first-team all- 
conference players for the CCAC, 
while Brittany Hengesh made the sec- 
ond team. Davis was also an NAIA Ail- 
American Honorable Mention. Kensie 
Duvendack, Danielle Johnston and 
Katie Gremar were ail NAIA Scholar 
Athletes. Davis, Page, Schmitt and - 
Hengesh were named NAIA Scholar 
Athletes. 



SPORTS: WOMEN'S SOCCER 253 



SeU PORAY\ 



Seth Doran, a junior from Bloomington Normal, III., says 
that he has been playing golf for as long as he can re- 
member. His love for golf brought him to Olivet to play on 
the golf team. Seth has loved playing golf here at Olivet, 
and he has had the great opportunity to travel to Florida 
with the golf team. He enjoyed the trip with the guys, as 
well as hanging out with them on the bus going to and 
from tournaments. Seth has learned a lot from playing golf 
because, he says, golf "is a very frustrating game that truly 
teaches patience and self control." 




254 



GOLF 




so'^wnrei? p&DTo 




Although the golf 
season officially begins in thl 
spring, the golf teann gained 
some great monnentum in 
the fall, with five golfers com- 
peting in the NCCAA National 
Championship. 



so'^wiTrei? pioTo 




1. The golfers pose for a 
team photo. 2. Tate Dugger 
makes the perfect swing dur- 
ing tee time. 3. Jeremy North 
watches his ball soar after 
the perfect swing. 



"There are ten players in all, and 
my goal is for them to win con- 
ference and place some guys in 
national tournament," assistant 
coach Brian Hyma says. Leading 
the team to a ninth-place finish 
at nationals was Seth Doran, who 
shot a 76-73, 149, to finish in a tie 
for sixth place. Chris Dean, Bob ' 
Workman and Jordan Dillard also 
shot well for the event. 




golf255 



CROSS 

CDOY^TR^ 



tvvewS CROSS coowfR-y 

It's safe to say that the men's 
cross country season was a suc- 
cess. Coach Michael McDowell 
was named Chicagoland Col- 
legiate Athletic Conference 
Coach of the Year, after leading 
his team into an NAIA top ten 
spot for the first time in the Uni- 
versity's history, finishing ninth 
overall. 




PtoTo T^Kev\ -^V: iShf^it ?^)RKee 



At the NAIA National Meet, the 
team finished 1 2th overall. Drew 
Collette finished 14th with a time 
of 24:50, and Kenny MacDonough 
was right behind him, finishing in 
25:41 . Several otherTiger runners 
also finished with competitive 
times. Tiger runners earned more 
than half of the spots on the all- 
conference team, and Collett was 
named the CCAC Runner of the 
Year. 




1. Drew Collette, Andrew 
Claussen and Alex Ger- 
ber fly in formation. 2. 
Kenny MacDonough and Alex 
Gerber give 110 percent. 
3. Drew Collette puts his 
endurance to the test. 



256 



MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 







SO'^IVvfTTep PioTO 







1. The men and women of 
the cross country teams 
come together for a 
photo. 2. Amy Catlett is 
giving it her all. 3. Ka- 
tie Thorne presses on. 



vOOtweViS CROSS COOVJ-t-R^ 

Katie Thorne and Amy Catlett 
kept the women's cross 
country team alive this sea- 
son, even after three of their 
teammates were sidelined by 
injuries. The team remained 
strong despite their circum- 
stances. 



According to coach Michael 
McDowell, it was an "extremely 
unusual year"for the Lady 
Tigers because they were not 
able to create a complete 
team. Both runners ran well, 
andThorne missed qualifying 
for the NAIA National Cham- 
pionships as an individual by 
only two places. 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 257 



t^ev^'S Tev>v\ls 



The men's tennis team enjoyed 

another excellent fall season this 

year, going undefeated at home 

and maintaining an impressive 

road record. The first match, and 

first victory, of the season was a 6-2 

win over Huntington University. 

Their next win was a home match 

against Bethel College with a final 

score of 6-3. 



Next, the Tigers hit the road for 
the ITA regional meet in Spring- 
field, III. ONU doubles teams 
fared well with one duo making 
the quarter finals and another 
making the semifinals. 
In their last match of the season, 
theTigers hammered Marion 
College 9-0, marking the end of a 
stellar fall season. 






258 SPORTS: MEN'S TENNIS 




so^iwiTrei? ptoTo 





Pk)To UKftv^ iry: cjMwic t>oRKee 



1. The men's tennis team tak 
time out of practice to pose 
for a picture. 2. Victor Mes 
quita Jr. and Mirko Perusich 
Jr. give each other a high f 
after winning a match. 3. Ma 
Bell shows the opposing team 
how to make a perfect return 
4. Maurice Hutton rushes to 
ball for a return. 



voowvev\*5 itywsls 






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vv 



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fto^T*Ke« TO a^wI^RKee 



1. The women's tennis team 
works the court during a 
group photoshoot. 2. Ali- 
cia Cullen and Erin Bales 
§tand their ground during 
ifaoubles match. 3. Susan- 
na Zwirkoski uses all of 
|ier effort to get the ball 
to her opponent. 4. Jade 
jtanlick prepares herself 
:o make the perfect serve. 







91010 i>iKev> T/: cSMwie 5>oRKee 



While the women's tennis team pre- 
pared to work their way to the NAIA 
National Tournament with a full spring 
schedule, they once again cruised 
through an impressive- fall season. During 
the fall season theTigers dominated the 
competition 7-1, including victories over 
St. Ambrose University, Calumet College 
of St. Joseph and University of St. Fran- 
cis. The team won their first six games, 
including a 6-3 win at home against 
Huntington University and a 9-0 win at 
St. Ambrose University. 



SPORTS: WOMEN'S TENNIS 259 



CDR^ WilY\Le\A 



Cory Hainlen is a sopho- 
more on this year's varsity basket- 
ball team. Cory has been playing 
basketball for as long as he can 
remember, and has been playing 
competitively since first grade. 

Basketball did influence 
Cory's decision to come to Olivet. 
As he began to meet with the 
coaches and visit the school, Cory 
soon knew that this was a team he 
wanted to play for, and liked the 
fact that he could play at a Chris- 
tian school. 

Cory loves playing on the 
basketball team. He loves the 
friendships and spiritual growth he 
has gained from playing. Cory has 
learned much from coach Ralph 
Hodge as well: time management, 
mental strength, and developing a 
determination to become better at 
the tasks at hand. 

Of his basketball experi- 
ence here Cory says, "I have be- 
come a much stronger person, 
emotionally and mentally, from the 
grind of everyday practice. I have 
also noticed a drastic change in my 
spiritual life. I came here as a Christian 
who attended church regularly but 
was never that close to God. Now I 
have noticed how God is working in 
my life and it is a fantastic change." 



1. The team rallies togeth- 
er to encourage one another 
before a game. 2. Brandon 
Streets takes a shot. 3. 
Antonio Marshall is focused 
on the game. 4. The team is 
ready to go. 5. Coaches Nick 
Birkey and Ralph Hodge watch 
with anticipation. 6. Nick 
Klomstad goes for two points. 



260 SPORTS: MEN'S BASKETBALL 













Although the young Tiger basket^ 
squad hovered around the .500 mark 
for most of the season, they finished the_ 
regular season in third place in the Chi-^ 
cagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference. 
After toppling Illinois Institute of Tech- 
nology in the opening of the conference 
tournament, the Tigers stunned Indiana 
University-South Bend in the semi-finals 
and nearly beat the No. 1 -seeded Robert 
Morris College in the finals. They finished 
the season at 1 6-1 5 (6-4 in the CCAC). 






PJ£>TO TAKeVJ ^: WVARiNiv P0T5 



In the postseason, Antonio Marshall 
was named CCAC Freshman of the. 
Year. Juniors Rashad Mitchell and Tyler 
Wallenfang were named to the CCAC 
All Conference team, and sophomore 
Cory Hainlen and freshman Antonio 
Marshall were named All Conference 
honorable mentions. 




^ii.-ij- 



SPORTS: MEN'S BASKETBALL 2 61 



90W wviUeR 



m 



Poppy Miller is a senior on 
this year's basketball team, and one 
of the team captains. Poppy first 
started playing basketball when she 
was 4 years old and she has loved it 
ever since. 

Basketball played a major 
role in Poppy's decision to come to 
Olivet. She says, "I never would've 
known about Olivet if it weren't for 
basketball." She did know that she 
wanted to be actively involved in a 
basketball program. As she explored 
her options, she found that Olivet 
had a good program in her selected 
major, and she then knew that this 
was where God wanted her to be. 

Poppy has loved playing bas- 
ketball at Olivet. One of her favorite 
parts about being here has been the 
strong Christian friendships she has 
been able to make with the girls on 
the team. 

She says, "I've met so many 
great girls, and the memories we've 
made are unforgettable." She has 
loved being able to share her passion 
of basketball with them, and that has 
made her time at Olivet "a great ex- 
perience." Poppy says that, "Through 
basketball, I've learned a lot about 
myself and about life, lessons that I 
will carry with me long after that last 
buzzer sounds." 

1. Jealyn Foston is giv- 
ing it her all. 2. McCall 
Kitchel looks for an open- 
ing. 3. Courtney Neil de- 
fends with her all. 



262 



SPORTS: WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 




otAtyf\'S '^ASKenALL 




4. The team smiles for 
a picture. 5. Court- 
ney Hehn dribbles the 
ball. 6. Coach Doug 
Porter talks to the 
team . 




It was a season of streaks for the 
women's basketball team. After 
starting withfour wins, the Tigers 
dropped their next three. While 
showing flashes of greatness — 
including a stretch of six consecu- 
tive victories — inconsistent piay 
ultimately hampered the team. 
The season ended with a disap- 
pointing first-round loss to Robert 
Morris in the CCAC tournament. 
They finished the season 16-14 
(4-6 in the CCAQ , _ ' 




Despite the disappointing loss in 
the tournament there were still 
awards for the Tigers in theChica- 
goland Collegiate Athletic Confer- 
ence. Seniors Courtney Hehn and 
Poppy Miller were both honored 
by being named to the All Confer- 
ence team. 



K 



SPORTS: WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 2 63 



Re'^eccN cRovOLe^ 



i 



Rebecca Crowley is a senior 
from Auburn, III., and she has been 
cheerleading for seven years, four of 
those at Olivet. She was the cheer- 
leading captain her senior 
year, and she loved being 
able to work on new routines 
with her co-captain Brittany 
York and her squad. 

Some of Rebecca's favorite 
memories come from the Home- 
coming routines. Rebecca loved be- 
ing able to perform with her squad 
and get the adrenaline rush as the 
crowd went wild. 

Rebecca has loved being a 
part of the squad and has learned 
a lot from cheerleading. She has 
learned a lot about patience, since it 
takes much time to perfect and be 
able to perform a stunt. She has also 
learned a great deal about trust. She 
says that more than any other sport 
she has ever played, she has learned 
to trust those in the squad with her, 
as often her body or someone else's 
body and safety are in the hand of 
the squad members, 

Rebecca says she has, "learned 
much from cheering here at ONU these 
four years. I will miss this year's squad 
members and coaches very much, 
but am very excited to see next year's 
improvements and accomplishments 
have made some amazing friends." 



1. The girls stand in for- 
mation. 2. Rebecca Crowley 
and Kaley Krull are hoping 
for a win. 3. Adam Wil- 
liams, Josh Crowley, Jake 
Crowley and Jordan Maurer 
represent ROTC during a 
basketball game. 



264 SPORTS: 



CHEERLEADING 




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The 2008-2009 cheerleading 
squad was full of spirit and 
life. The squad consisted of 19 
members, seven males and 
1 2 females. The entire squad 
worked hard to rebuild the 
strength of the squad, as many 
of the participants were new to 
collegiate cheerleading. 



PJdto uk6v\ -W: d>>wvfe !>0RKee 



4. The cheerleaders are 
all smiles for their team 
picture. 5. Brittiny York 
leads the crowd. 6. Kaley 
Krull is all smiles. 



But the individuals on the team 
were talented and diverse in skil 
and did well at performing at 
a high level. The team was led 
coach Mindy Kimmel and cap- 
tains Brittiny York and Rebecca 
Crowley. 







\^ 



SPORTS: CHEERLEADING 



265 



I>ORe\A CDtAe>RT 




r 




Freshman Lauren Connfort be- 
came the defensive specialist the team 
needed. Coach Williams has much ap- 
preciation for their young, talented 
/ player. "She gives you everything she has 
^' every time she sets foot on the court; 
she never complains; she works hard ev- 
ery day at practice and just wants to do 
what she can to help the team win," the 
coach says. 

Being called a hard worker is noth- 
ing new to Lauren — she says she works 
so hard because she is a very competi- 
tive person. "Being an athlete is about 
pushing yourself to the limit to get bet- 
ter every day, and that is what I try to do," 
she says. 

When she is not being the best 
defensive player she can be, Lauren likes 
to play games and have fun with her 
friends, but she also enjoys having time 
to herself while watchingTVor 
a movie. Lauren is looking for- 
ward to her next three years at 
ONU and expects to improve 
in the coming years. 



1. Stephanie Smith 
won't let the ball 
go down . 2 . The 
girls celebrate to- 
gether. 3. Terese 
Byrne and Sara Byrne 
act as a team. 




P^TD TAKCV, ^:lS7:^Zv 




266 SPORTS: WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 





i)Dtvvev\'$ 



5^LL 




The volleyball team finished their 
season with a 38-1 1 record. They 
were a perfect 10-0 in Chicagoland 
Collegiate Athletic Conference play, 
taking both the regular season and 
tournannent titles. In the first week 
of December, they wrapped up their 
season at the NAIA National Tourna- 
ment in Sioux City, Iowa. They lost in 
pool play, but not before giving No. 
3 Concordia University a competitive 
five-game match and defeating No. 
22 Walsh University. 



I U>io T>iKev\ -w: ^RfewT Miuyni 



4. The team gets together 
for a group shot. 5. The 
girls are ready to play. 
6. Laura Wilkens waits 
for the serve. 



Senior Michelle McFadden earned 
Second Team All-American honors 
and junior Erin Sikora earned NAiA 
Third Team honors. Coach Brenda 
Williams was named the AVCA 
NAIA Mideast Coach of the Year. . 



SPORTS: WOMEN 



'S VOLLEYBALL 267 



^O'i KRme 




268 FEATURE STORY: BOB^K^INe 



Bob Kring was a man of many talents, abilities and outstanding qualities, butthe one overarching 
feature about him seemed to be his desire to give God all the glory for his life. Bob Kring passed away 
November 21 , 2008, after a battle against cancer. Bob is very missed, but his memory and contributions 
to the Olivet community live on. 

Bob was a youth leader for many years. Professor Mark Holcomb has said that Bob was a youth 
pastor before it was fashionable to be a youth pastor, and because of Bob's example and leadership, 
men like Professor Holcomb and many others were able to step into youth pastor positions after him. 
Associate Dean for Student Development Dwayne Mills refers to Bob as "Mr. Youth Ministry," and re- 
marks that he always wanted to serve the youth and be around them. 

Bob not only served as an example as a youth pastor, but also served on many different councils and in 
leadership positions, always ready to give his all to any who needed him. Bob also had a large impact 
on the youth conference "Celebrate Life." He took the event from a 200-student Bible quizzing event 
to a 2000-student youth conference filled with talents, games, crafts, and so much more. It was at this 
conference in 2007 that Bob was presented with the honor of a scholarship being named after him for 
youth ministry majors at Olivet. 

Bob served the Olivet community for many years. He was the director of campus recreation from 
2000 to 2006. After Bob, Dwayne Mills took over the position, and then Matt Smith after him. Both had 
known Bob previously through different councils and activities and both men speak of Bob with the 
highest regard, saying that he was always a volunteer and, in his heart, he was always a youth pastor. 
He loved to be around youth and speak into their lives, no matter what the occasion. 

Bob was an icon in the youth ministry field, and had a large impact in many different ways. His 
absence is felt by the Olivet community, his friends, and his family. His wife is still very involved at Olivet 
as an RD in Old Oak. His three children are all Olivet alumni and live close to the area. Bob was a great 
man and one whose legacy will not soon be forgotten. As professor Holcomb says, "Nobody replaces 
Bob Kring." 

Even after Bob became sick, he was a great encouragement and always willing to give of himself 
In the hospital, Bob was always willing to give encouragement and give all the glory to God. As Bob 
passed from this life to the next there was a sadness, but there was also a thankfulness for the 
years that Bob had lived and served. 
Remember Bob, Matt Smith says, "The grace in 
which he died should teach us how to live." A 
life such as Bob's deserves to be remembered 
and honored, and as Bob would have wanted, 
to give all of the glory to God. 





FEATURE STORY: BOB KRING 269 




ploTo i>Kew W: a^wwe pijftKee 







^AU t^vrt'y wvew'&eRs, Av>t> all 
M& wew^eRS of Ue 'W>?^, 
•%erw6 t^\rt^, ARe owft -W)?^; so 

ALSOiSaRlST. 

\ CDRfV\UiAV\S t^:l^ CAS»f> 



SO'ttMTTe!? PJ^TO 



'>■•-•, 



evt'5/ivi^ex 



We Celebrate a long and close 

relationship with onu. 
We are proud of our students! 





Todd Hespell I Jason Hopkins I Brittany Hulse I Mil<e Goad 

Courtney Bronson I Caitlin Cinaries I Samantha Krestel 

John Rachan I Matt Boyce I Neil Rago I Laura Benda 

Corrie Everson I Drew Silver 



Chicago First Church of the Nazarenej 

Rev. Kevin M. Ulmet, Senior Pastor 



RrstChurch 

ofthe 

Nazarene 



12725 Bell Road Lemont, IL 60439 



708-349-0454 



www.chicagofirstnaz.orc 



272 ADVERTISEMENTS 



I 



» 




OF'f, 




oJtFie 




aEarene 




Find your way home 



Timothy R. Smith, Senior Pastor 

Sherri Chapman, Worship Pastor 

Wes New, Family Pastor 



WeVe proud of our 

students! 

Joy Dierickx & 

Austin Senior 



^ 




Phone:616-887-1169 

Fax: 616-887-3742 

www.spartanaz.org 

665 13 Mile Rd. 

Sparta, MI 49345 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



273 




May God bless the path you take 
after leaving Olivet Nazarene University. 

Congratulations! 

Nathan Lacher, Jayme Karenko, 
Christian Lacher and Kevin Racier 



500 N Central 



Roxana, IL 62084 



Phone: 618-254-402) 



274 ADVERTISEMENTS 




M I pi 



401 W. Holmes Road 

Lansing, Michigan 48910 

Phone:517-882-5775 

E-mail: southnaz@southnaz.org 

Web Page: www.southnaz.org 



OUR STAFF 

Rev. Dr. Harold Demott, Pastor 

Rev. Kiesha Henry, Children 

Lee Ann Garza, Choir 




OUR STUDENTS 



Cassandra Garza 
Michael Garza 
Alaina Hamlin 

Michael Hileman 
Sarah Hileman 



Jonathan Kundrat 

Tricia Kundrat 

Allison Lash 

Hillary McDaniel 



Joni Miller 

Sarah Oliver 

Brady Oring 

Adam Reader 

Freddy Shoffstall 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



275 




I 

We are so proud of you, 
Courtney EanesI I 



SOUTH BEND FIRST 

Touching Our World as Christ Touches Our Lives 



51690 Ironwood Road 



South Bend. IN 



4663. 



276 ADVERTISEMENTS 



IHortheastern Indiana District 

The Church 

Our Futures "^^^^ 

^NEI District I YOU! 



OUR 2009 ONU 
GRADUATES 

Conrad M. Cooper 
Austin R. Bender 

Stephen J. Hamilton 
Andrew P. OIlis 
Ryan A. Person 

Ciirista N. Sunberg 
ChristopiierA. Ral<oczy 

Rebekaii A. Ral<oczy 
Megan R. Reed 
Adam J. Shalley 
Asiiley N. Farris 

Ciiristen E. Sanders 

Rebecca A. Bailey 
Ashley M. DeArmond 

Kimberly R. Behning 

Megan J. McKinley 






Dr. David Roland 

District 
Superintendent 



QNU Trustees 

Kevin C. Dunlop 

Mark Bennett 

Gene Snowden 

Gary Cable 

Chuck Sunberg - Alumni 

David G. Roland 



Congratulations to our Ht\ Graduates & Thank You to Pr. John Bowling^ 
and all the faculty and administrators of ONU for a Job well done! 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



277 



FORTVILLE CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 



Fortville, Indiana - Indianapolis District - (317) 485-6443 

www.fortvillenazarene.org 

Phil Edwards, Senior Pastor 



Su pport Staff: 

Tony McCrary - Worship & Administration Pastor 
Josh Robertson - Youth Pastor 
Lynne McCrary - Pastor of Childhood Development 
Danette Hall - Pastor of Early Childhood Develeopment 
Sara Whitaker - Visitation Pastor 




We are so proud of all of our 

students and congratulate them and the 

graduating Class of 2009! 




Brad Arthur, Caleb Chastain, Miriam Edwards, Justin Flatter, 
Amber McCrary, Darin Riddle, Sarah Riddle, Sam Summerlin 

and Elizabeth Virt 

CONNECTING CHrviST TO OUR WORLD 



278 ADVERTISEMENTS 




Ilnols District 

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
New Passion... New People... fi New lUinois 



Congratulations to our Illinois Graduates! 

Dr. James Spruce, District Superintendent, District Advisory Board 

and your Illinois District Church Family 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



279 



MICHIGAN DISTRICT 

Church of the Nazaren e ( 



We're proud of you, 

Michigan District 

Olivetians! 





Your 

Michigan 

Districi 

Family 



na^a^lMm 



HI 



Warming the 

world with our 

brightest 



and best 



151 80S. Wright Rd. 



Grand Ledge, Ml 48837 



PH: 51 7.622.8450 



I 



280 ADVERTISEMENTS 



PITTSFIELD 

Church of the Nazarene 



1 




h 



We 



are so 



proud 
of you, 
Carrie 
Booth! 



Experience a fresh encounter with God! 

227 W. Washington St. 

Pittsfield, Illinois 62363 

217-285-4091 

www.pittsvillenaz.org 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



281 



Owosso Church of the Nazarene 



1865 South M-52 

Owosso, NI 48867 

989-723-2229 

E-mail: OCNoffice@michonline.net 

www.OwossoNazarene.com 




y^,=>-53' 




We are so PROUD of our students, 

Kirstin Ketterman and 

Meagan Olds! 

Rodger De Vore, Lead Pastor 

Mariene Webster, Children & Family Formation Pastor 

Murphy Gill, Worship Arts Pastor 

Craig Moore, Student Life Pastor 



282 ADVERTISEMENTS 



Hr^ 1=: D C. tfH 
Li II rl 3 t-f 



rirs 





CtlUfCtl 




ADVERTISEMENTS 



Chapman Memorial 
Church of the Nazarene 

The ivorth of our students... 

II 




7520 E."U" Ave. 

Vicksburg, Michigan 49097 

269-649-2392 






284 ADVERT IS 



EMENTS 



*% 








Church of the Nazarene 




12 N101 Berner Road I Elgin, IL 60120 I 847-888-3795 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



285 



College Church 

of the Nazarene 



University Campus: 

200 University Avenue 
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914 

North Campus: 

897 W 6000 N Road 
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914 

www.collegechurch.org 
815.933.7749 



Kendall Franklin 

Senior Pastor 

Paul Johnson 

University & Young Adult Pastor 



Sunday Morning Worship 

9 a.rr.. University Campus Sanctuary 
10:30 air,. Par lor -University Campus i 
Christian Life Center 

9 a.m. North Campus 

10:30 ajr». North Campus \ 



Wedlnesday Evening 

7 pm. Parlor -University Campus Christian Life Center 
7 pjn. Journey -University Campus Sanctuary 




j:nQ(Ht^Y h &oei. A ^hce ^o Av^f of^t^j Lectr p^if-n ohy ec(YS oif^ 



286 ADVERTISEMENTS 



'To Know Christ and Make Him Known" 




Church of the Nazartne 



Elizabeth Agan, Harrison Agan, Seth 
Atinialy, Cole Berkley, Justin Beuthin, 
David A. Caudle, Kristin Cheney, Ian 
Cole, Patrick Cole, Chad Cook, Jordan 
Cook, Alyssa Cramer, Jordan Cramer, 
Chelsea Deaton, Logan Dugger, Tate 
Dugger, Nicholas Frazier, Benjamin 
(iGerboth, Jordan Gerstenberger, 
Elizabeth Groover, Andrea 
Humrichouser, Nancy Miller, Alex 
Ripberger, Brittany Scruggs, Hannah 
Short, Hilary Short, Anastasia White, 
Elizabeth White, Benjamin White, 
Kristin Wininger, Anson Workman 




Westside Church of the 
Nazarene 
8610 W. 10th St. 
^^. Indianapolis, IN 46234 
^J^l 317-271-7607 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



287 



iw«>ex 





T'! 



Adderley, Jacob 39 
Agan, Elizabeth 231,287 
Agan, Harrison 231,287 
Alford, Amy 233 
Alleman, Erin 204 
Allen, Daniel 8 
Allen, Kyle 11 
Allen, Sannantha 186 
Allen, Sannantha 189,66, 

70,16 
Allison, Whitney 54, 113, 

20 
Anderson, David 221 
Anderson, Sarah 43,20 
Andrews, Christie 178 
Anthony, Brent 194 
Arthur, Bradley 189 
Ascher, Timothy 211 
Athialy,Seth 230,241,213, 

220, 287 
Atkinson, Tiffany 180 
Ayers, Joshua 251 

#.. 





Bacon, Bethany 24, 204 
Bailey, Brittany 19,22 
Bales, Erin 259 
Barkman, Eric 241 
Barse, Jacob 16 
Battershell, Shannon 187, 

190,38 
Baumann, Kenneth 86,113 
Beaty, Paul 200 
Beaumont, William 111, 

222 
Beck, Arissa 194 
Becker, April 234, 243, 94 
Bedell, Rachel 11,31,168, 

1 70, 1 1 3, 208 
Begick, Natalie 32 
Behning, Kimberly 189, 

107 
Bell, Amy 236 
Bell, Christy 233 
Bell, Mark 258,19 
Benda, Laura 272 
Bender, Austin 192,113 
Benson, Michael 29,50 
Bentle, Abigail 188,61,51 



Berkley, Cole 203, 287 
Bernhardt, Elizabeth 22 
Berquist, Derek 24 
Berry, Joby 52 
Berry, Stephen 113 
Beuthin, Justin 287 
Biswas, Dolphy 213 
Bloom, Casey 194,66 
Blucker, Erin 233 
Bluege, Cortney 180 
Bocanegra, Alexa 223 
Boehmer, Rebecca 204 
Bollinger, Jaclyn 56,174, 

225 
Bontrager, Kaylee 113 
Booker, Kathryn 70 
Booth, Carrie 59,281,16 
Borgman, Lindsey 1 74, 1 7 
Boss, Jacob 22 
Bouquet, Jennifer 19 
Bowne, Andrea 39 
Boyd, Terrell 103 
Brashaw, Melissa 26 
Brause, David 169 
Briggs, Lauren 14 
Bright, Lindsey 11,170, if 
Briles, Jesse 189,190,63 
Brillion, Matthew 207 
Bronson, Courtney 272 
Brown, Chelsey 107 
Brown, Elizabeth 107 



ifl 



ita 



288 ^NDE^ 



I 



^ 



srown Jessica 242 
iurch, Benjamin 63 
urk, Blaire 224 
urke, Rachel 178 
urkey, Jonathan 50 
urr, Lukas 248 
utier, Lincoln 24 
lutton, Kayla 204 
lyrd, Valerie 164 
lyrne, Sara 266 
iyrne,Terese 266,211 



c 



16 



J 



able, Kendra 233 
alero,Tony 175,113,201 
arlson, Jennifer 165 
arpenter, Brittany 189 
•arr, Casandra 64 
;arroll, Melanie 110 
■atapano, Ashley 42,43, 

108 
:atlett,Anny 257 
:awvey, Matthew 1 95 
ihannbers, John 21 1 
Iharboneau, Joel 242,243 
:harles,Caitlin 272,20 
ihastain, Caleb 278 
Iheever, Crystal 219 
iheney, Kristin 287 
henoweth, Alyssa 188 
hew, Jason 39 
hristensen, John 6 



Christiansen, Bethany 49, 

69 
Clark, Andrew 32 
Clark, Sarah 49,213 
Clausen, Andrew 256 
Close, Lindsay 239 
Closser, Rebecca 224 
Cobb, Greg 245,16,50 
Cole, Hillary 31,90,112, 

113 
Cole, Ian 31,43,89,113, 

287 
Cole, Patrick 245, 287 
Collette, Drew 256 
Colling, Phillip 26 
Collins, Tiffany 179,216 
Comfort, Lauren 266 
Cook, Chad 287 



Cook, Jordan 287 
Coopwood, Kennedy 22 
Coots, Benjamen 179,218 
Corcoran, Derek 241 
Cox, Melissa 26 
Cox, Stephanie 61 
Cramer, Alyssa 287 
Cramer, Jordan 287 
Crawford, Joshua 200 
Crofford, Hank 102 
Crombar, Brandon 1 74, 1 89 
Crouch, Rebecca 264 ' i 
Crowley, Josh 264 / / 

Crum, Caitlyn 59 / / 

Cryer, Courtney 231 ^ 
Cullen, Alicia 259 ^ 

Curtis, Heidi 56 . 

U 
U 
(t 

i ( 




pjio-f +aKew vi: wvM- aw+JvOv»^ 



n 

It 



INDEX 289 



^ 



Daniels, Melanie 175 
Darland, Nicholas 248 
Davenport, Kayla 218 
Davenport, Kent 49,189 
Davis, Anny 26 
Davis, Michelle 253 
Dawson, Rachel 180 
Dawson, Stephanie 180 
Dean, Katelyn 71 
Deaton, Chelsea 287 
Delaney, Kenneth 34, 35, 

99,113,206,20,21,22 
DeMerell, Christopher 56 
DeMerell, Laura 239,22 
Dennis, Jason 16 
Denny, Michael 49, 189, 

101 
Denton, Hope 176 
Deter, Tricia 173 
Detrich, Jennifer 174 
Dickey, Jenna 177,235, 

244, 37 
Dierickx,Joy 187,189,196, 

273 
Dillard, Jordan 254,255 
Dillard, Nigel 251 
Di Monte, Sarah 70 
DiRienzo, Juliana 60 




Doan, Annber 172 
Dodge, Caitlin 20,52 
Doran, Seth 254,255 
Dossett, Tyler 177 
Doud, Abigail 35,223, 16 
Downs, Chelsey 26 
Downs, Katlyn 1 87, 26, 1 88 
Dugger, Logan 287 
Dugger,Tate 255,287 
Durkee, Jamie 30,31,34, 
35,42,168,228,246, 
101,103,248,249,264, 
14,15,16,17,21,22 
Duvendack, MacKensie 
253 



Eanes, Courtney 276 
Eccles, Kathryn 216 
Edwards, Miriann 278,20 
Eggleston, Jordan 218 
Eis, Stephanie 188 
Ekema, Stephanie 173 
Erdahl, Kristen 236,240, 

243 
Erdahl, Lauren 225 
Erway, Caleb 220 
Escobar, Alejandro 56,52 



290 INDEX 



L 






Esplnoza, Adriana 1 70, 66, 

113 
Everson, Corrie 272 




=arris, Ashley 189 
=earon, Jamie 179,216 
-"ellows, Kyle 56,188 
-erguson, Dana 225 
=ett, Melissa 42, 189 
^iibeck, Janel 35 
-inney, Lauren 16 
"latter, Justin 278 
-leschner, Laura 239, 15 
-leschner, Stephanie 244 
-lowers, Michael 63 
=oley, Robert 249 
-ontem, Rodrigue 28,251 
j-orneris, Ryan 249 
-oster, Elizabeth 199 
-oster, Peter 26, 1 89, 1 9, 50 
"oston, Jealyn 262 
-rakes, Jarryd 100 
-raley, Marshall 28, 248, 

249 
-rame, Lukas 244 
■reed, Chelsea 199 




Galvan, Candice 39 
Garza, Cassandra 275 
Garza, Michael 275 
Gee, Alyssa 39 
Geiselman, Kailey 190 
Gerber, Alex 256 
Gerboth, Benjamin 287 
Gerstenberger, Jordan 287 
Gibson, Andrea 179,204 
Gibson, Jeremy 237 
Gidcumb, Caitlin 26 



Gilkey, Hilary 188,189 
Giove, Sarah 1 67, 1 68, 226 
Glenn, Kyan 181 
Goedhart, Allison 224 
Gongaware, Anthony 114, 

20 
Gonzalez, Liliana 110,219 
Green, Alexander 223 
Greene, Kevin 192 
Greene, Travis 202,19 
Green, Lauren 31,43,90, 

113 
Gremar, Katie 253 
Grochowski, Sebastian 24 
Groover, Elizabeth 287 
Grossman, Erica 56 
Grubbs, Amy 211 





PJOTO lh\<m TV: TiW STep{^V\SftV\ 






I 



INDEX 291 




Hainlen, Cory 260,261 
Hale, Scott 223 
Hall, Tyler 111 
Hamilton, Stephen 200 
Hamlin, Alaina 170,275 
Hamminga, Sarah 63 
Hancock, Shannon 204 
Hanson, Amanda 184 
Harrelson, Amanda 113 
Harris, Brittany 177,232 
Harris, Jessica 209,224 
Harrouff, Martha 224 
Hartley, Tara 63,224 



Harvey, Zachary 39 
Hatalla, Faith 70 
Hausken, Kate 233 
Hay, Emily 26 
Hayes, Ryan 198,201 
Hays, Lance 188 
Hazen, Rebekah 218 
Heaton, Jacob 24 
Hehn, Courtney 28,263 
Helmker, Sarah 215 
Hengesh, Brittany 26, 253 
Henning, Sarah 34,35,103, 

210 
Hernandez, Elizabeth 43, 

66, 67 
Herr, Ryan 220 
Hespell,Todd 272 
Hileman, Michael 275 
Hileman, Sarah 275 
Hill, Austin 26 
Hill,Emilee 175,189 
Hinkley, Jeffery 63 




PiO-fO +aK€-W l-i: ^RftVH- awHovTV 



Hjort, Joshua 223 
Hobbs, Sarah 169 
Hodge, Kellie 39 
Hoekstra, Loren 32 
Hoekstra, Stacey 1 74, 1 05 
Hollenberg, Stephen 230 
Hopkins, Jason 272 
Hoppe, Merideth 69, 113, 

215 
Hoskins, Alison 205 
Houseman, Lindsay 198 
Howell, Jerremy 211 
Howells, Joshua 248 
Hsu, Shang 89 
Huber, Kenneth 26 
Huff, Holly 235 
Hughes, Rebecca 264 
Hull, Tyler 231,223,22 
Hulse, Brittany 272 
Humrichouser, Andrea 287 
Hurt, Katrina 244 
Hutchison, Megan 204 
Hutton, Maurice 258 



I 



Ibanez, Emely 164 
Imig, Michelle 233 
Ipema, Brooke 6 
Ivey, Callie 177 



292 INDEX 




pivO-(-o -(-aKcv) ^^: "SRevj-^ aw-f Jvovi^ 



I 




ackson, Ben 32,43,40 
ackson, Hahnah 226 
Jackson, Jacob 168 
ackson, Lisa 65, 22 
ackson, William 250 
acobson, Emily 177,235, 

37, 99, 22 
ahn, Camilyn 32 



James, Ashley 28 
Jefferies, Timothy 53 
Johnson, Dennis 171 
Johnston, Danielle 253 



K 



Karenko, Jayme 274 
Karg, Evan 187,49,38,61, 

19,52 
Keating, John 187,31 
Kee, Matthew 241,22 



i_ 



Kehoe, Laura 177,243,22 
Keller, Jeremy 245,16 
Kendrick, Anna 71 
Ketterman, Kirstin 282 
King, Darcy 252 
King, Nicole 201 
Kirsch, Katherine 189,90, 

101,107 
KitchelMcCall 262 
Klein, Nicole 26 
Klomstad, Nicholas 260 
Klontz, Kalyn 165 
Knight, Aaron 203 
Knol, Andrew 164 
Kolber,Anna 28,252 



INDEX 293 




Lacher, Christian 274 
Lamb, Nikki 207 
Lambright, Kyle 16 
Lam, Kristin 42,168,175, 

95,113 
Lamping, Jeffrey 171 
Lamping, Meagan 28,113 
Lash, Allison 275 
Ledyard, Megan 24 
Lee, Angela 65 
Leib, Susan 179,240,216 



Leimann, Charles 223 
Leimann, Dan 192, 1 13 
Lennon, Sara 39 
Lewis, Emily 215, 19 
Liechty, Derek 69 
Lillie, Reuben 235,242,37 
Lindsay, Christina 69 
Lindsay, Courtney 32 
Lochner, Jeremy 89 
Loeffler, Amy 234 
Lopez, Tanya 100 
Love, Neil 221 
Lowry,Anne 49, 188 
Lyie, Matthew 31,171,174, 

199,106,70,113,201 
Lynn, Sondra 176,113,211, 
256 



^ 




McGuire, Ashley 233 
Mclnerney, Melissa 215 
Mclntire,Ashlie 177,37 
Mcintosh, Anna 184 
McKinley, Megan 106 
Means, Victoria 188,63 
Medley, Rachel 243 
Mellinger, Lucas 192 
Memenga, Kristen 205 
Mengarelli, Janina 49,113 
Mesquita, Victor 258 




pj>o-(-o -f-aKftw i-i: -SReM-f an+ivow^y 



pfco+o +aKfcvi ti: wt,n+ awHoM-Y 



294 INDEX 



• • ^r^ • 




pttrto «Kevi f-i: W4H+ aw+loM^ 



:«i^ 



\/leyer,Amy 176,211 
\Aeyers, Brandi 225 
\/lick, Karin 240 
Vlikhail, Jonathan 235 
\/liller, Joni 275 
Mer, Nancy 287 
Vliller, Nicole 177 
yiiller, Poppy 262,263 
yiiller,Zarah 20,21 
yiills, Leah 178 
dingus, Faith 16 
i/lingus, Luke 22 
yiitchell, Rashad 28,261 
yikhwanazi, Vincent 251 
VIohr, David 245 
Aoore, Benjamin 1 77, 244 
" Tloore, Bradley 223 
/loreau, Kelsey 71 
Vlorse, Bradley 62, 63 
|i/lounts, Austin 15 
^/Iroz, Michael 202 
/lulder, Dana 89,113 
/lurphy, Michael 248 
/lurray, Kristin 24, 166 
/lyatt, Katherine 168 




pJvO+O -f-aKftVI -^-i: ^R€,W+- aw+IvOVl^ 



v\ 







Neeley, Leeanna 198 
Neil, Courtney 262 
Norman, Elena 109,68 
North, Jeremy 255 
Nygard, Elise 234 



Olds, Meagan 282,52 
Ollervidez, Carter 22 
OIney, Luke 244,9 
Oring, Brady 275 
Ovington, Nichole 230 



-INDEX 295 




Phillips, Mary 26 
Phillips, Timothy 234, 238 
Pierce, Jana 187,188 
Pleasant, Abby 231 
Poling, Emily 31,96,102 
Porter, Jessica 22 
Price, Amy 204 



Padgett, Emilie 72 
Page, Rachel 253 
Palm, Sarah 214 
Park, Allison 204 
Parsons, David 20 
Peacock, Kyle 32, 1 1 3 
Penev, Stephanie 92 
Pennington, Zacari 164, 

191 
Person, Ryan 202 
Peterson, Eilene 188 
Petree, Brittany 186,189 
Peulausk, Elisabeth 37 
Phillips, Derek 219 




Quandt, John 176 
Quanstrom, Daniel 105, 

113,217,20 
Quimby, David 180 





Rachan,John 272 
Rader, Kevin 274 
Radzimanowski, John 20 
Radzimanowski, Morgan 

193 
Rago,Neil 186,272 
Rattin, Brandon 169 
Ray, Adam 8 
Reader, Adam 275 
Reames, Luverta 65 




pi,o+o +aKe\a VI: Wavw- an+tovrt 



pjio+o +aKeM t^: tRfcM+ an+dovn 




# 



296 INDEX 




pivo-f -(-aKew -i^i mtv\-^ aw-c-ikoww 



^eddick, Blake 177,232, 

239, 242, 244 
^eed, Aaron 49,188 
^eed, Allison 59 
^eed, Bradley 190 
^eed, Megan 31,244,50 
?eedy, Angela 237 
beeves, Alyssa 178 
(egenfuss, Rebekah 209, 

224 
Sice, Andrew 32,167,189, 

101,113,222 
jRichardson, Heidi 22 
Riddle, Darin 278 
(Middle, Sarah 278 
lipberger,Alex 287,20 



Ritter, Karen 32 
Ritter, Sandra 61 
Rivas, Angela 188,39 
Rivera, Sal 220 
Roach, Amanda 69,217 
Robins, Meagan 207 
Robison, Merrick 35, 177, 

232, 242, 244 
Rodriguez, Alex 31, 113 
Rodriguez, Daniel 31,113 
Rodriguez, Soledad 66 
Rojek, Kathleen 24,195, 

210 
Roloff,Jarret 195,96,113 
Root, Adrienne 216 Root, 

Polly 179,216 




Rosales, Lindsay 212 
Rothney, Whitney 196 
Rouse-Nelson, Tanicia 39, 

69 
Ruddle, Jessica 188 
Rushing, Amy 204 /, 

Russo, Mary 42, 60 ^ 



y. 



</ 



>> 



^y 



</ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



/ 



y INDEX 297 




Saffell, Kyle 220 
Sanders, Christen 52 
Sandoz, Erin 71,224 
Sarver, Rachel 285 
Scannapieco, Stephanie 

193 
Schaunnburg, Laura 26, 193 
Scheller, Jerry 24,241 
SchelUulie 14 



Schick, Adann 26 
Schield, Megan 179 
Schimp, Michael 221 
Schnnidt, Jacob 63 
Schnnitt,Janel 252,253 
Schnnitz, Andrew 63 
Schroeck, Desiree' 188 
Schultz, Jonathan 97 
Schwind, Megan 66, 1 1 3, 

215 
Scott, Hannah 56 
Scott, Maya 1 87, 1 88 
Scruggs, Brittany 221, 287 
Seed, Sabrina 66 
Senior, Austin 32, 1 89, 1 90, 

273 
Severs, Joshua 234,37 



Shaughnessy, Ann 194,95 
Sheets, Charles 191,64 
Shernnan, Megan 167 
Shilvock, Sarah 25,201 
Shore, Tyler 285 
Short, Hannah 287 
Short, Hilary 287 
Short, John 39 
Shunnaker, Jessica 195, 20lil 
Siems, Amanda 186,30, 

179,193 
Sikora, Erin 267 
Silver, Drew 272 
Sinns, Anthony 20 
Sly, Jannes 26 
Snnidt, Peter 166 
Snnidt, Sannuel 216 




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293 INDEX 




pivO-f H-aKevi ^^: mtv)-{- awfivovo^ 



mith, Abigail 205,225 
mith, Alexandra 39,207 
mith, Colleen 221 
mith, Ian 234 
mith, Jacob 223,22 
mith, Robert 165 
mith, Stephanie 266 
mith, Travis 164 
■mit, James 26 
niegowski, Alexander 63 
[nyder, Kelcey 63 




Tatman, Whitney 19 
Taylor, Brooklyn 178 



Taylor, Reagan 24 
Ter Beest, Amanda 225 
Terhorst, Heather 69 
Tharp, Dallas 192 
Thomas, Allison 235 
Thomas, Brittany 166, 188, 

190,206,52 
Thompson, James 230 
Thompson, Kristin 60 



Taylor, Jasper 168,212,218 Thorne, Kaitlynn 257 
Taylor, Megan 39,252 Thurman,Todd 169 



INDEX 299 



Tijerina, Joshua 189 
Toibert, Christopher 218, 

53 
Trisilla, Nina 26 
Troglio, Jon 251 
Tuinstra, Brianne 28 
Tyma, Elise 196 




Ufkin, Katherine 186,191 
Upchurch, Brandon 199, 

106 
Upshaw, Matthew 69, 21 1 
Urbanick, Clayton 168 
Urfer, Danielle 242 



^ 



Vanderhei, Michael 168 
Vanderhoof, Dustin 223 
Vanderpool, Amanda 204 
Vander Schaaf, Danielle 

#.. 




211 
Vandersteen, Scott 202 
Vander Velde, Kami 26 
Vandewoestyne, Julie 63 
Vaughn, Jenny 180 
Versweyveld, Lauren 59, 

225 
Villa, Jose 250 
Villotti, Nathan 169 
Virt, Elizabeth 278 
Voss, Elizabeth 178 
Voss, Jeremiah 233 




Wahler, Andrew 32 
Wakefield, Kevin 171,199, 



106 
Walker, Christopher 250, 

251 
Walker, Kyle 39 
Walker, Matthew 26,251 
Wallace, Mathew 169 
Wallenfang, Tyler 261 
Waller, Nathaniel 15 
Wangler,Tracey 43, 195 
Wantz, Sara 68 
Warren, Jacqueline 43,101 

40 
Watson, Julie 214 
Watson, Kristen 180,66 
Weeden, Nathan 188 
Welter, Brian 97,69,217, 

227, 22 
Werntz,Audra 189,102, 

113 
Weston, Timothy 24 
White, Anastasia 173,58, 



300 



INDEX 






pivO+0 faKfew -5^: 3Revi+ awHovi'f 



P2>0+0 +aK€.M -5^: ■5RfcM+ aw+jvov»^ 



4r'^ 

287 

Vhite, Elizabeth 69, 287 
Vhiteside, Michael 20 
Vickey, Keitha 196 
Vilkens, Laura 267 
Vilkerson, Jennifer 236 

ard, Amber 166 



Workman, Anson 287,21 Young, Ashley 184 
Workman, Robert 254, 255, 

222 
Wright, John 32 
Wright, Melissa 1 84, 1 85 



iams, Adam 264 

lams, Devin 14 

iams, Jon 238 
i\/ilson, Bethani 221 
Vininger, Kristin 287 
^olfe, Stephen 34, 35, 241 
l»/oodburn, Ashley 61 
*(/oods,Alissa 109,204 
ii/oods, Joshua 240,37 





Yanchick, Sarah 22 
York, Brittiny 264, 265 
Yost, Dana 113 



Zaborowski, Steven 178 
Zavitz, Lindsay 204 
Ziverts, Erica 58 
Zolman, Kylie 180 
Zwirkoski, Susanna 259 



INDEX 



301 



i 




ivj-feRyjovev) 



As the 2008-2009 school year closes at Olivet, there is much to look back on 
with joy and a sense of accomplishment. Each and every student, faculty, 
and staff member could tell endless stories about this past year. Failures, 
successes, joys and pains, and each of these stories make up the wonder- 
ful network and community of Olivet Nazarene University. 

Throughout the year, it is easy to get overwhelmed by all of the respon- 
sibilities and deadlines that seem to mount up no matter how hard one 
tries to get ahead. During these times we tend to feel lonely and isolated; 
yet we must remember that we are never alone. We forever have the help 
of our wonderful Creator, and we always have the support of our wonder- 
ful Olivet family. 

No matter what challenges and difficulties we may face, we must remem- 
ber that our stories are interwoven together. We are woven together as 
a community, as friends and as Christians. As the year comes to a close, 
many will go their separate ways. Many will graduate, some will study 
abroad, and some will return to our campus next fall. No matter where we 
go as this year ends, we must remember that for this one school year, our 
lives have been forever interwoven with each other. 

God promises to never leave us alone, and He has given us each other to 
help us through whatever mountains and valleys we may face. 1 Corin- 
thians 1 2:1 2 says, "The body is a unit, though it is made up of many parts; 
and though all its parts are many^ they form one body. So it is with Christ." 
We are all individuals with talents, hopes, ideas and gifts to give to those 
around us. Yet as we are interwoven together we become the one body of 
Christ that we have been ordained to be. No matter what we face or where 
we go, we must always rest in the knowledge that our lives have been in- 
terwoven with each other, and we are forever interwoven with our God. 



302 



'r: 




CLOSING 303 



•f ^av)K "ifoo 





Over the past year, this unique opportunity has been more of a blessing then I ever 
thought possible. I have been honored to Work wrth some of the most talented and 
passionate people at Olivet. I could have never accomplished this task on my own. Goc 
has placed so many individuals around this position who work hard to see the Aurora 
become something great.Throughouttheyear, our theme verse, I Corinthians 12:12, 
resonated in my mind. While we came from different backgrounds and shared differen 
responsibilities, each of us as individuals came together to form one unit to share the 
Olivet story. 

I would like to take a moment to thank those individuals, even though I could never 
thank you enough! 



b5i 



ithf 



First and foremost, I want to thank God for blessing me with such an amazing opportu 
nity. You have taught me this year to trust You no matter the circumstances. I am learn 
ing to follow You no matter where I think you might lead me. Thank you for opening 
up this door — and so many others — throughout the year. 

To my family, I could never thank you enough for your continued support throughout 
my life. You have always believed in me when others had their doubts. Every single on 
of you has made a huge impact in my life. You have made me strong. Thank you for 
always being willing to listen to me, even if I called you late at night to get your advice 
Your constant prayers for me have been greatly appreciated. I could not imagine my 
life without the family God has blessed me with. I love you! 



list 



ate 



Ka 



jttir 



'001 



Heidi and Bekah, thank you for taking my mind off of things when I came back to 
room. Our no yearbook talk -- 



th' 



policy was very beneficial. 
Our F.R.I. E.N. D.S. marathons 
this year and random 
movie nights will never be 
forgotten. You both have 
been a constant support 
over the last four years. 
Thank you for believing 
that I could take on this 
task. Thank you for being 
willing to step in when I 
needed help and always doing it with a smile. I know we will all go 
in different directions after graduation, but I am confident that our 
friendship will always stay strong. Thank you both for being who 
you are! I am truly blessed to be able to call you both friends. 




liler 

pyai 



3f'S, 



To my fellow ASC members, your prayers and words of encourage- 
ment throughout the year meant a lot. John, Evan, Rachel, Austin, Amanda, Kat, Shannon, Neil and Jessica: It s been 
said before and I am going to say it again ... we are a family! One year ago I had no idea who most of you were. Now, I couldn' 
imagine not knowing all of you. I am so blessed to have made friendships with all of you. You all have taught me so much with 
out even knowing it. The impact each of you has made on me will not be forgotten. I can't wait to see what each and every on 
of you accomplish in your lives. 



ippe 



304 



THANK YOU 



lUi: 



it weren't for this year's amazing Aurora staff, this book would not have been possible. It has been such an honor and a 
jessing to have the opportunity to work with students like you. When someone picks up a copy of this year's Aurora, they 
'ill be impressed with all of the hard work each of you put into this product. 

Dthe Design Team, you guys absolutely rock! All of you are so creative and it shows throughout the book. Thank you for 
ot giving up when the server crashed so many times. Without you, this book would not have been possible. 

Dthe Photo Team, if it weren't for all of you this book would have nothing to look at. The pictures in this volume of the /Al/- 
5ra are better then they have ever been. You all have taken pride in capturing the important moments that have taken place 
verthe past year. Thank you for being willing to step out of your comfort zone to get that perfect unique shot. 

Dthe Writing Team, I have never been more proud! I think each of you have grown this year and it's been so much fun to 
/atch ... and read. Thank for handling each story with pride. I am so glad we were able to showcase your talent throughout 
lis book. 

Dthe Business Team, thank you for working so hard behind the scenes. Thank you for writing letters to countless churches, 
luffing multiple envelopes and working so hard to get advertisements. 

iate Morgan. . . WE DID IT! Remember when we first met each other while traveling five hours in a car to St. Louis? I am so 
lad we bonded over our secret passion for Jesse McCartney. We both had no idea what we were getting into, but somehow 
/e came through it. You went above and beyond your job description as the Aurora adviser. Thank you for being one of my 
iggest supporters throughout this year. You have believed in me this entire year and that means the most. Thank you for 
utting up with all of my frantic phone calls, my super-long e-mails, and running down to the office when I needed help. 
our attention to detail during the editing process was a huge help to the entire staff I can't thank you enough for what you 
■ave done this year. 

/oody Webb, thank you for being a constant support. All your advice and wise words really got me through the year. I truly 
opreciate your willingness to help out with this edition ofthe/\Lirora. It has been an honorto work with such a respectable 
idividual. I will always remember the supporting words and prayer you spoke in our one-on-one meeting. I could only hope 
) become close to the type of leader you have been to me this year. Thank you! 

lalerieTanke, you have been a great representative this year. Thank you for putting up with all my questions. If it weren't for 
Du and the staff at Walsworth this book would have had many flaws. 



jefi 



-ep'C 



leather Day, Donnie Johnson and the Office of Mar- 

eting Communications, thank you for all of your help 
btaining photos of people and events. Your contribution 
) this year's Aurora is greatly appreciated. 

D people not motioned, you are definitely not forgot- 
?n. Thank you for your continued support and 
rayers. Thank you for always supporting this 
Bar's Aurora staff and helping us out. 

eing a part of something that is so important 
) Olivet has been such a blessing. I truly take 
ride in this position and can't wait to see what 
appens in the coming years. The relationships 
lave built over this past year have truly been 
"e-changing. 




-^^^^- 





THANK 



YOU 305 



coLop^ov) 




w 



Editor: 

Annie Shaughnessy 
Adviser: 

Kate Morgan 
Business Team: 

Ashley Woodburn, 
Business Manager 

Heidi Zinnmerman, 
Ads Editor 

Sarah Horvath 



Writing Team: 

Natalee Anderson, 
Executive Writer 
Kayla Koury, 

Executive Writer 
John Adanns 
Jessica Cohea 
Luverta Reams 



Design Team: 

Casey Bloom, 

Executive Designer 
Beth Hagenburg 
Zachary Hosick 
Rebekah Nichols 
Sarah Rutledge 
Rachel Straub 
Chris Tudor 



Photography Team: 

Brent Anthony, 

Executive Photographei 
Arissa Beck 
Jamie Durkee 
Zachary Frye 
Nichole Ovington 
Mariah Potts 
Timothy Stephansen 



The 96th Olivet Nazarene University /Aurora was created by a student staff and printed by Walsworth Publishing Company of 
Marceline, Mo. Valerie Tanke was the sales representative and Michelle Brosemer was the service representative. The press run 
was 2,1 00. Pages were completed on Apple computers using Adobe InDesign CSS. Photos and graphics were edited in Adobe 
Photoshop CSS. Copy was written and edited by the Aurora staff Additional photos were provided by The Image Group and 
the Office of Marketing Communications. 

The cover is printed on white linen material and mounted on 1 60-point Davey Board. The cover is a four-color printed cover, 
with a clear varnish coating. The cover was designed by Annie Shaughnessy, Casey Bloom, and Zachary Hosick. End- 
sheets are white standard matte paper with spot color #4635 milk chocolate. Paper stock throughout the entire book is 
1 00-pound gloss. Headlines are in the font Sharpie. The body copy is in Myriad Pro and Sharpie, and the caption copy is in 
Courier New. 

Portraits were taken by Jim McAdams of MJM Photography, 1101 North 800 East, Greentown, IN 469S6. 

Inquiries regarding the book should be directed to the Aurora, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Box 6025, 
Bourbonnais, IL60914, or815-9S9-5SS7. 

30 6 COLOPHON 






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